Update - IM Santa Fe Ft-V flat car


Bruce Smith
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Mike Brock" <brockm@...> wrote:
So...let's move on to more useful
subjects...like problems with the model. Richard says the the laser cut wood
floor is too thick. How much too thick? Can it be lowered by sanding?
Mike, Folks,

Having received my IM 70 ton AAR flat (ATSF class Ft-V), I set about to answer this, and in the process, discovered where IM may have strayed... at least partially.

The laser-cut wood deck on the model is held on with super-sticky double sided tape. I was able to remove the deck pieces by gentle, but persistent work with a "chisel" blade. The deck came off with the tape and often the paint on it (no worries - the paint is under the deck!). The same blade was useful in scraping the tape off of the back of the deck. Following that, I cleaned the back of the deck and the car with Goo Gone to remove the sticky crud that was left. At that point, test fitting the deck resulted in a much closer fit. I think IM forgot to include the thickness of the tape and paint in their calculations for the model! <G>

I also seized upon the opportunity to remove the little tags that were left by the laser cutter to attach the decks to the supporting frets. I also cleaned out the slots in the main deck where the bolster bumps out towards the middle of the car - these were definitely too tight on the RTR model.

Because I wanted the deck to be perfectly level with the bolster tops, I did decide to sand the back. I used some 90 grit, VERY CAREFULLY, followed by 200 grit paper to slightly thin the pieces. 20-40 light strokes was all it took. The deck is now drying on my workbench after staining with a mix of black and brown leather dye diluted in alcohol (to give the car a look of relatively fresh creosote. I plan to attach the deck with gel type ACC when it is dry.

All this handling has resulted in two more repairs. Both the air hoses and the stirrup steps did not survive my ham handed work, so they will have to be replaced. In addition, I have replaced the wheels with 0.088 tread wheels from Branchline and the #5 clones with Kadee #58 couplers.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Brian Carlson <brian@...>
 

I agree with you Bruce, My B&O car is complete, much in the same way you did
it, except I managed to not break any stirrups or the air hoses. I did sand
two fingernails though. Maybe the next runs will compensate for the tape
thickness. I used Barge cement to reattach my deck. I have had too many
issues with ACC popping due to different shrinkage and expansion rates.

Brian J. Carlson, P.E.
Cheektowaga NY

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
smithbf36832
Sent: Saturday, September 05, 2009 11:13 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Update - IM Santa Fe Ft-V flat car

--- In STMFC@..., "Mike Brock" <brockm@...> wrote:
So...let's move on to more useful
subjects...like problems with the model. Richard says the the laser cut
wood
floor is too thick. How much too thick? Can it be lowered by sanding?


Tim O'Connor
 

All this handling has resulted in two more repairs. Both the air hoses
and the stirrup steps did not survive my ham handed work, so they will
have to be replaced. In addition, I have replaced the wheels with 0.088
tread wheels from Branchline and the #5 clones with Kadee #58 couplers.
Regards
Bruce Smith

Bruce, I need a tool item as follows: a device that screws into
the truck bolster (remove trucks first) and that projects outwards
creating a protective "box" around the sill steps. With one of these
devices screwed into each bolster, I could work on virtually any
freight car -- painting, details, repairs, decaling -- without any
danger to the delicate sill steps, brake hoses, cut levers etc.

I have such an item for painting -- a metal jig with two metal
"handles" that screw into the car and into the jig, so the car can
be painted easily without having to touch the car body. But when
working on the car one wants to handle the car, lay it down, etc
and this always involves risk to the small details.

I can't tell you how many brake hoses and sill steps I've broken and
had to replace by now. I'm sure it numbers in the dozens. Usually I have
replacement parts, but not always. I'd much rather not break them in the
first place.

Tim O'Connor


mcindoefalls
 

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Bruce, I need a tool item as follows: a device that screws into
the truck bolster (remove trucks first) and that projects outwards
creating a protective "box" around the sill steps.
Tim, I can't exactly picture what this "tool" would look like, but I understand your goal. Couldn't something be cobbled up from relatively thick (.060, maybe?) styrene?

Walt Lankenau


Robert kirkham
 

I think Tichy includes a pair of small T shaped plastic parts in the USRA SS kit that would work to protect some of the underbody. They press fit into the bolsters until the trucks are ready to be applied. I do not see a reason you couldn't insert them (without glue of course) and then glue their bases to some .06" styrene sheet cut a little wider than the outline of the car (looking from the track up). It wouldn't stop every ding, but most of them.

Rob Kirkham

--------------------------------------------------
From: "Tim O'Connor" <timboconnor@...>
Sent: Sunday, September 06, 2009 10:54 AM
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Update - IM Santa Fe Ft-V flat car

All this handling has resulted in two more repairs. Both the air hoses
and the stirrup steps did not survive my ham handed work, so they will
have to be replaced. In addition, I have replaced the wheels with 0.088
tread wheels from Branchline and the #5 clones with Kadee #58 couplers.
Regards
Bruce Smith

Bruce, I need a tool item as follows: a device that screws into
the truck bolster (remove trucks first) and that projects outwards
creating a protective "box" around the sill steps. With one of these
devices screwed into each bolster, I could work on virtually any
freight car -- painting, details, repairs, decaling -- without any
danger to the delicate sill steps, brake hoses, cut levers etc.

I have such an item for painting -- a metal jig with two metal
"handles" that screw into the car and into the jig, so the car can
be painted easily without having to touch the car body. But when
working on the car one wants to handle the car, lay it down, etc
and this always involves risk to the small details.

I can't tell you how many brake hoses and sill steps I've broken and
had to replace by now. I'm sure it numbers in the dozens. Usually I have
replacement parts, but not always. I'd much rather not break them in the
first place.

Tim O'Connor






------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




rwitt_2000
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Brian Carlson" <brian@...> wrote:

I agree with you Bruce, My B&O car is complete, much in the same way
you did
it, except I managed to not break any stirrups or the air hoses. I did
sand
two fingernails though. Maybe the next runs will compensate for the
tape
thickness. I used Barge cement to reattach my deck. I have had too
many
issues with ACC popping due to different shrinkage and expansion
rates.

Brian J. Carlson, P.E.
Cheektowaga NY

Bruce and Brian,

Thanks for the advice about removing the wood deck.

Have other also noticed that the InterMountain AAR flat car model lacks
the "floor stringers". The resin model from ProtoWest Models does model
them as they appear on the drawing of the flat car designed for the ERIE
RR.

Bob Witt
Indianapolis, Indiana


Brian Carlson <brian@...>
 

Yes, noticed that, but to be honest, if the model is on the track no one
notices. I'll have my Protowest car and the IM car with me at Naperville, as
a side by side comparison.

Brian J. Carlson, P.E.
Cheektowaga NY

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
rwitt_2000
Sent: Sunday, September 06, 2009 9:03 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Update - IM Santa Fe Ft-V flat car


Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

Tim O'C. expresses a need for protective devices, i.e. protective of ham-handedness, that will screw into bolster holes during kit construction. An easy device that will at least partly serve this purpose is the routine install of a pair of empty plastic truck frames. I keep a cup full of these discards around for just such purposes.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Okoboji, IA