Topics

ACC Applicators


RichardS <rstern1@...>
 

I would like to hear what others are using for applicator tips for ACC glue bottles.

How do you keep them from clogging?

How do you clean them out when clogged?

In particular, I have been using some applicators that fit onto the bottle top. They have a metal tube that is quite small -- I only use them for the thin liquid ACC. They are great for this purpose, giving very good control of the thin glue that tends to run otherwise.

Nevertheless, they clog after a few uses and I haven't figured out any way to clean them out -- I don't have any wire or drills small enough to fit into the tiny tubes and ACC debonder doesn't seem to work.

Thanks
Rick Stern


Jack Burgess
 

I would like to hear what others are using for applicator tips
for ACC glue bottles.

How do you keep them from clogging?

How do you clean them out when clogged?

In particular, I have been using some applicators that fit onto
the bottle top. They have a metal tube that is quite small -- I
only use them for the thin liquid ACC. They are great for this
purpose, giving very good control of the thin glue that tends to
run otherwise.

Nevertheless, they clog after a few uses and I haven't figured
out any way to clean them out -- I don't have any wire or drills
small enough to fit into the tiny tubes and ACC debonder doesn't
seem to work.
The only CA that I use is thin ZAP by Pacer Industries (dark pink bottle). I
buy only the smallest bottles. They come with a Teflon tube which is
inserted in the tip of the bottle after cutting off the "lid" which I throw
away. (The joint between the Teflon and the bottle can leak. The solution is
to get some CA on the joint and then spray it with accelerator which
normally solves the problem.)

We have no humidity here in the Bay Area so I very rarely have the Teflon
tube clog up, even after months of use. If you are continually working, this
setup should be fine. If you are going to stop using the CA for awhile, you
might set the bottle down and tap it a couple of times on the workbench to
get the CA out of the tube and back in the bottle. If you do get a clog, you
can cut off the tip of the Teflon tube to solve the problem.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


pierreoliver2003 <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Rick,
I don't bother trying to use those tubes/tips that come with the glue. With the rather humid conditions in Southern Ontario I find that they clog up rather quiclly.
I simply dispense a small amount onto a piece of plastic and use a pin to transfer from the puddle to the joint.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "RichardS" <rstern1@...> wrote:

I would like to hear what others are using for applicator tips for ACC glue bottles.

How do you keep them from clogging?

How do you clean them out when clogged?

In particular, I have been using some applicators that fit onto the bottle top. They have a metal tube that is quite small -- I only use them for the thin liquid ACC. They are great for this purpose, giving very good control of the thin glue that tends to run otherwise.

Nevertheless, they clog after a few uses and I haven't figured out any way to clean them out -- I don't have any wire or drills small enough to fit into the tiny tubes and ACC debonder doesn't seem to work.

Thanks
Rick Stern


Dennis Williams
 

Pierre.
  I sometimes do the same. I found that sometimes you can scratch the hardened ACC off with the back of an X-acto blade and it just snaps off. 
 
Dennis Williams
Munhall, Pa.
www.resinbuilders4u.com

--- On Wed, 10/7/09, pierreoliver2003 <pierre.oliver@sympatico.ca> wrote:


From: pierreoliver2003 <pierre.oliver@sympatico.ca>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: ACC Applicators
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, October 7, 2009, 9:02 AM


 




Rick,
I don't bother trying to use those tubes/tips that come with the glue. With the rather humid conditions in Southern Ontario I find that they clog up rather quiclly.
I simply dispense a small amount onto a piece of plastic and use a pin to transfer from the puddle to the joint.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups. com, "RichardS" <rstern1@... > wrote:

I would like to hear what others are using for applicator tips for ACC glue bottles.

How do you keep them from clogging?

How do you clean them out when clogged?

In particular, I have been using some applicators that fit onto the bottle top. They have a metal tube that is quite small -- I only use them for the thin liquid ACC. They are great for this purpose, giving very good control of the thin glue that tends to run otherwise.

Nevertheless, they clog after a few uses and I haven't figured out any way to clean them out -- I don't have any wire or drills small enough to fit into the tiny tubes and ACC debonder doesn't seem to work.

Thanks
Rick Stern


















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

I'm with those who don't like the applicator tubes and prefer using a pin as an applicator. I've been impressed with the Bob Smith Industries CA packaging, with a tip which doesn't ever seem to clog, though it's too large to use as an applicator by itself.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


al_brown03
 

I dispense onto a round toothpick, apply to the model with that.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

I'm with those who don't like the applicator tubes and prefer
using a pin as an applicator. I've been impressed with the Bob Smith
Industries CA packaging, with a tip which doesn't ever seem to clog,
though it's too large to use as an applicator by itself.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Jim & Lisa Hayes <jimandlisa97225@...>
 

I use the lid from a Pringles can as my palette. I use a corsage pin (ball
end removed) clamped in an Xacto handle as an applicator. For adhesive I use
CA from Tech- Bond http://tech-bond.net/. It's guaranteed fresh and comes in
a bottle with a pin in the cap to seal the nozzle and there are fins on the
inside of the cap to prevent the whole cap from being glued to the bottle. I
think Mike Rose sells a similar product that looks like it uses the same
bottle.

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon
www.sunshinekits.com


Bill Darnaby
 

I have used nothing but the cheap Duro super glue, $0.99 per tube, that I get at the local hardware store for all of my resin kits. I also assemble them outdoors during humid Indiana summers. Yes, the nozzle tends to clog up. However, I have found a wonderful tool for declogging them. If you have ever had a root canal take a look at the little reamers the dentist uses to clear out the tooth root. They look like tapered twist drills about 1/2 inch long with a plastic handle on the end. They are extremely sharp and come in diameters from .010" to about .060". Both times I was in to see this dentist I asked for some and he gave me a couple of envelops with all diameters.

I just twist one down into the nozzle and pull it out. It neatly takes the CA plug with it. Of course, these things are extremely useful for reaming out all kinds of holes in plastic and brass, yes they are that sharp, in models.

Bill Darnaby


chapbob@...
 

Al Brown writes: "I dispense onto a round toothpick, apply to the model
with that."


Same here, plus I sharpen the toothpick with a few licks from a flat file.
Bob Chapman


thomasmclae
 

I put a drop in a piece of wood (Floor leftover) and use a toothpick for the transfer. The ACC jar stays fresh, and the glue gets where it goes.
For grabs, I dip the part in the glue, then apply the part to the model.

I use the same piece of wood when clearing by Faller glue bottle. I run a drop on the wood to make sure the glue is flowing, then apply glue to the modes/part. Makes for less surprises, such as when a big blob of glue squirts out. :)

Thomas

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "pierreoliver2003" <pierre.oliver@...> wrote:


Rick,
I don't bother trying to use those tubes/tips that come with the glue. With the rather humid conditions in Southern Ontario I find that they clog up rather quiclly.
I simply dispense a small amount onto a piece of plastic and use a pin to transfer from the puddle to the joint.
Pierre Oliver


Allen Cain <allencain@...>
 

Like so many others have noted, I use a straight pin with the head cut off
in an X-Acto type knife made by a third party (came in a free knife set from
Model Expo) which has a plastic/rubber insert designed to hold a round tool.
The ACC is dropped sparingly onto a piece of wax paper that my wife
grudgingly donates to the cause.



I do sharpen the pin point on a stone to get a nice precise point.



I also use the very inexpensive add on tips on the bottle. They look like
plastic tubing that has been heated and pulled to neck down most of the
tube. The large end is forced onto the bottom and the tip is very long. If
the tip plugs, just cut it off as there is plenty of length. When finished,
I pull it off the bottle and throw it away and seal the bottle. These are
very cheap.



I also buy in small bottles as others because this stuff goes a long ways.
I do tend to buy the generic brands carried in the hobby shops as I just
have not seen the difference in performance in HO trains. Now, if I was
building a R/C Plane which sees much more stress, I would be more selective
in the adhesive I use. I have also used the stuff found in Wal-Mart and
Home Depot and see not difference.



The real key is in the skills of the person applying the ACC unless of
course you are attaching "engineered plastics" which is another subject all
together.



Allen Cain


rgmodels@...
 

I use a 4" square of 1/4" glass for a drop of ACC. When your glass is
about covered you can scrape off the dried ACC with a razor blade.

For an applicator I use applicators I make. A needle inserted in a piece
of 1/4" dowel with the end ground off forming a "U" at the end. Several
small size needles will cover most applications. To get rid of dried up ACC
I keep a cheap cigarette lighter handy to burn off the ACC.
I'll will have a supply of these applicators available at next years Nat NG
Convention in St. Louis.

eric/Rio Grande Models


Lee Thwaits <leethwaits@...>
 

Acetone is the solvent for ACC. Keep a small bottle of acetone handy and dropped your applicators, tubes, etc. in it when finished using and take them out next time you need them.

Lee


Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

This is a copy of my reply to the same inquiry made recently on the Passenger Car List:

Three lessons from life about the useful application of ACC from tubes:

1) When puncturing the tube opening, avoid any inadvertent squeezing of the tube so that the contents are not under pressure to pour out.

2) *Never (ever!) allow these tubes to rest in any other position but UPRIGHT (I keep square styrofoam scraps with V-shaped cuts in the middle designed to hold these tubes)*.

These simple two directives above will result of having a tube of ACC that- a) can last usable for months on end; and b) has a tip free of any clogging.

3) Do not apply glue directly from tube, but only into a tiny intermediate puddle (Westerfield technique) from which actual application is made by needle or similar. Even then, let the glue flow from the tip without squeezing the tube except perhaps with imperceptible pressure at the very bottom.

Instead of glass for puddling, I use small squares of aluminum foil reinforced by folding the edges. I puddle the very tiniest drop, and I use steel sewing needle applicators in holders (superior!), rather than pins. I keep an old razor blade handy to constantly "peel" off any dried ACC on the applicator tip.

I purchase Asian-produced ACC tubes in bulk at flea markets for about @ $0.15, and have been doing so for some years. Occasionally, I get a dry tube, or a tube of ACC that sets so fast one does not have time to work it, but on balance this stuff does exactly what I want and expect it to do at very little cost. My current tube was opened for use this past May, and the tube, the applicator, and the glue remain quite usable.

Denny


Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento


Stokes John
 

Denny,

Thanks for taking the time to be detailed and explicit on your techniques. This kind of information and experience is invaluable and I for one appreciate the tips and will put your method to good use.

John Stokes
Bellevue, WA

To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
From: danspach@macnexus.org
Date: Thu, 8 Oct 2009 09:55:32 -0700
Subject: [STMFC] Re: ACC Applicators





















This is a copy of my reply to the same inquiry made recently on the

Passenger Car List:



Three lessons from life about the useful application of ACC from tubes:



1) When puncturing the tube opening, avoid any inadvertent squeezing

of the tube so that the contents are not under pressure to pour out.



2) *Never (ever!) allow these tubes to rest in any other position but

UPRIGHT (I keep square styrofoam scraps with V-shaped cuts in the

middle designed to hold these tubes)*.



These simple two directives above will result of having a tube of ACC

that- a) can last usable for months on end; and b) has a tip free

of any clogging.



3) Do not apply glue directly from tube, but only into a tiny

intermediate puddle (Westerfield technique) from which actual

application is made by needle or similar. Even then, let the glue flow

from the tip without squeezing the tube except perhaps with

imperceptible pressure at the very bottom.



Instead of glass for puddling, I use small squares of aluminum foil

reinforced by folding the edges. I puddle the very tiniest drop, and

I use steel sewing needle applicators in holders (superior!), rather

than pins. I keep an old razor blade handy to constantly "peel" off

any dried ACC on the applicator tip.



I purchase Asian-produced ACC tubes in bulk at flea markets for about

@ $0.15, and have been doing so for some years. Occasionally, I get a

dry tube, or a tube of ACC that sets so fast one does not have time to

work it, but on balance this stuff does exactly what I want and expect

it to do at very little cost. My current tube was opened for use this

past May, and the tube, the applicator, and the glue remain quite

usable.



Denny



Denny S. Anspach MD

Sacramento


Douglas Harding <dharding@...>
 

I agree with Bill. I use the cheap stuff found at the local hardware store. I don't use ACC in large quantities and found the
Hobby Shop bottles often dried up after long periods of dis-use, not just the tube, the entire bottle. It was a waste of money,
and as I don't live near a Hobby Shop, a real frustration. Now when a cheap tube dries up I just toss it, go to the fridge and get
a fresh one. And Yes I keep my ACC in the fridge, which seems to make it last longer.

I have a sheet of plate glass on the workbench, I squeeze out a little amount of ACC on the glass and use a straight pin stuck in
the end of a bamboo skewer as an applicator. Once the puddle dries I scrape it off the glass with a used single edge razor blade,
and squeeze out another drop. I have much better control with this applicator, less waste, and I don't glue my fingers together
anymore.

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org


frograbbit602
 

I put three to four drops of ACC in a bottle cap (from bottled water) that sits in a piece of foam to hold it at an angle so the ACC collects at the bottom of the angled side. The tip of the ACC bottle is then wiped clean and cap put back on. Tip always stays clean. ACC is applied from bottle cap with a the eye of a needle that was cut in half to form a wye and inserted in a wood dowel. A tool like this is available from MicroMark if you choose not to make your own. When the eye of the needle clogs I use a disposable lighter to burn any accumulation off. Since the needle is stainless steel no harm is done ( does blacken ) to the needle tip. The burn method with lighter faster (takes seconds ) rather than using Acetone to clean it which is what I used prior to hearing about using the lighter.

Lester Breuer

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "RichardS" <rstern1@...> wrote:

I would like to hear what others are using for applicator tips for ACC glue bottles.

How do you keep them from clogging?

How do you clean them out when clogged?

In particular, I have been using some applicators that fit onto the bottle top. They have a metal tube that is quite small -- I only use them for the thin liquid ACC. They are great for this purpose, giving very good control of the thin glue that tends to run otherwise.

Nevertheless, they clog after a few uses and I haven't figured out any way to clean them out -- I don't have any wire or drills small enough to fit into the tiny tubes and ACC debonder doesn't seem to work.

Thanks
Rick Stern


Jared Harper
 

I purchased some CA from a vendor at the Cincinnati NMRA trade show. He advised to rub vaseline on the tip of the applicator and to always keep the bottle upright.
Jared Harper
Athens, GA

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

I'm with those who don't like the applicator tubes and prefer
using a pin as an applicator. I've been impressed with the Bob Smith
Industries CA packaging, with a tip which doesn't ever seem to clog,
though it's too large to use as an applicator by itself.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Jared Harper
 

I am not at home now so cannot check the brand, but the CA I purchased at the Cincinnati NMRA convention is still going strong. I purchased two regular and one thick in a tube. The first of the regular containers is about half full and still going strong. The other container of regular is in the frig. waiting for the first tube to run out.
Jared Harper
Athens, GA

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Denny Anspach <danspach@...> wrote:

This is a copy of my reply to the same inquiry made recently on the
Passenger Car List:

Three lessons from life about the useful application of ACC from tubes:

1) When puncturing the tube opening, avoid any inadvertent squeezing
of the tube so that the contents are not under pressure to pour out.

2) *Never (ever!) allow these tubes to rest in any other position but
UPRIGHT (I keep square styrofoam scraps with V-shaped cuts in the
middle designed to hold these tubes)*.

These simple two directives above will result of having a tube of ACC
that- a) can last usable for months on end; and b) has a tip free
of any clogging.

3) Do not apply glue directly from tube, but only into a tiny
intermediate puddle (Westerfield technique) from which actual
application is made by needle or similar. Even then, let the glue flow
from the tip without squeezing the tube except perhaps with
imperceptible pressure at the very bottom.

Instead of glass for puddling, I use small squares of aluminum foil
reinforced by folding the edges. I puddle the very tiniest drop, and
I use steel sewing needle applicators in holders (superior!), rather
than pins. I keep an old razor blade handy to constantly "peel" off
any dried ACC on the applicator tip.

I purchase Asian-produced ACC tubes in bulk at flea markets for about
@ $0.15, and have been doing so for some years. Occasionally, I get a
dry tube, or a tube of ACC that sets so fast one does not have time to
work it, but on balance this stuff does exactly what I want and expect
it to do at very little cost. My current tube was opened for use this
past May, and the tube, the applicator, and the glue remain quite
usable.

Denny


Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento


Paul <paullaciura@...>
 

I have stord several brands and viscosities of ACC in a refrigerator for many years with success. They are stored vertically as a group with a rubber band around them (for stability) in one of the "egg trays". For those that still use contact lenses, I utilize the spent plastic containers the lenses come in. I dispense a small puddle of ACC as needed. The "pot life" of the ACC is several minutes, some of the bottles are over 5 years old. Like everyone else I use a variety of pins, broken drill bits, needles, etc. to place the ACC with great control. At the end of the work session I throw the container out.

Paul LaCiura
Glendale, CA

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

I'm with those who don't like the applicator tubes and prefer
using a pin as an applicator. I've been impressed with the Bob Smith
Industries CA packaging, with a tip which doesn't ever seem to clog,
though it's too large to use as an applicator by itself.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history