Railway Prototype Cyclopedia Vol. 19


Ed Hawkins
 

STMFC Group,
The RP CYC Publishing Company is pleased to announce the imminent
release of RAILWAY PROTOTYPE CYCLOPEDIA, Volume 19, scheduled for
distribution beginning in the last week of October 2009. Volume 19
contains much useful prototype and scale modeling information: 149
black & white and color photographs, 31 diagrams, and 4 tables for a
total of 113 pages comprising three in-depth articles on the following
subjects:

1. Emergency Composite Box Cars by Patrick C. Wider (50 pages). The
article is the fourth in a series that cover American box car designs
that were built in large quantities during the first half of the 20th
Century. The author covers the single-sheathed and plywood-sheathed 40'
and 50' emergency box cars constructed during World War II following
restrictions imposed by the War Production Board.

2. Erie 40-Ton Express Milk Cars by Patrick C. Wider (10 pages). The
author describes and illustrates the unique Erie express milk cars
built during the 1930s by the Greenville Steel Car Company. Also
discussed and illustrated are some of the cars converted for express
baggage service.

3. The Family of All-Welded 70-Ton 52’-6” Drop-End Gondola Cars Based
on PRR's Class G31 by Ed Hawkins (53 pages). The article covers an
interesting group of subject cars first built by the Pennsylvania
Railroad (Class G31) in 1948-1950, followed in the 1950s with
derivatives built by American Car & Foundry and Pullman-Standard for
Pennsy, Atlantic Coast Line, Birmingham Southern, Delaware & Hudson,
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, Southern Pacific, Wabash, Sacramento
Northern, and Western Pacific.

We appreciate your support and extend to you a pre-publication offer
for Volume 19. The normal retail price for Volume 19 is $29.95.
However, your cost is only $24.00 (postpaid to addresses in the U.S.) -
a 20-percent discount. But here’s the catch! Your payment must be
postmarked by October 24, 2009 for this offer to be valid. Mail orders
with postmarks after this date will not be honored.

To take advantage of this one-time, pre-publication offer for RP CYC
Volume 19, please send a check or money order in the amount of $24.00
by October 24, 2009 to:

RP CYC Publishing Co.
P.O. Box 451
Chesterfield, MO 63006-0451

Missouri residents must add $1.85 state & local sales tax ($25.85 total
amount).

For single book orders to Canada, please add $5.79, and for single book
orders to all other countries please add $12.28 (Air Mail).

Internet users: Please visit our new web site address:
http://www.rpcycpub.com. A flyer with summary information in PDF format
can be downloaded at: http://www.rpcycpub.com/v19_flyer.pdf

For those attending the Naperville Prototype Modelers Seminar, if you
wish to have your book delivered at the meet, please indicate. We
encourage this option.

Please contact me off-list if you have any difficulties downloading the
PDF or require additional information. We thank you!
Regards,
Ed Hawkins & Pat Wider


feddersenmark
 

Speaking of war emergency boxcars, does anybody know why Intermountain chose to paint the roof of their C&NW version gray? As far as I know they were the same box car red as the rest of the car and the Viking roofs were not galvanized. Can anybody shed some light on this or is this another Intermountain goof? Thanks. Mark Feddersen

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Ed Hawkins <hawk0621@...> wrote:

STMFC Group,
The RP CYC Publishing Company is pleased to announce the imminent
release of RAILWAY PROTOTYPE CYCLOPEDIA, Volume 19, scheduled for
distribution beginning in the last week of October 2009. Volume 19
contains much useful prototype and scale modeling information: 149
black & white and color photographs, 31 diagrams, and 4 tables for a
total of 113 pages comprising three in-depth articles on the following
subjects:

1. Emergency Composite Box Cars by Patrick C. Wider (50 pages). The
article is the fourth in a series that cover American box car designs
that were built in large quantities during the first half of the 20th
Century. The author covers the single-sheathed and plywood-sheathed 40'
and 50' emergency box cars constructed during World War II following
restrictions imposed by the War Production Board.

2. Erie 40-Ton Express Milk Cars by Patrick C. Wider (10 pages). The
author describes and illustrates the unique Erie express milk cars
built during the 1930s by the Greenville Steel Car Company. Also
discussed and illustrated are some of the cars converted for express
baggage service.

3. The Family of All-Welded 70-Ton 52'-6" Drop-End Gondola Cars Based
on PRR's Class G31 by Ed Hawkins (53 pages). The article covers an
interesting group of subject cars first built by the Pennsylvania
Railroad (Class G31) in 1948-1950, followed in the 1950s with
derivatives built by American Car & Foundry and Pullman-Standard for
Pennsy, Atlantic Coast Line, Birmingham Southern, Delaware & Hudson,
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, Southern Pacific, Wabash, Sacramento
Northern, and Western Pacific.

We appreciate your support and extend to you a pre-publication offer
for Volume 19. The normal retail price for Volume 19 is $29.95.
However, your cost is only $24.00 (postpaid to addresses in the U.S.) -
a 20-percent discount. But here's the catch! Your payment must be
postmarked by October 24, 2009 for this offer to be valid. Mail orders
with postmarks after this date will not be honored.

To take advantage of this one-time, pre-publication offer for RP CYC
Volume 19, please send a check or money order in the amount of $24.00
by October 24, 2009 to:

RP CYC Publishing Co.
P.O. Box 451
Chesterfield, MO 63006-0451

Missouri residents must add $1.85 state & local sales tax ($25.85 total
amount).

For single book orders to Canada, please add $5.79, and for single book
orders to all other countries please add $12.28 (Air Mail).

Internet users: Please visit our new web site address:
http://www.rpcycpub.com. A flyer with summary information in PDF format
can be downloaded at: http://www.rpcycpub.com/v19_flyer.pdf

For those attending the Naperville Prototype Modelers Seminar, if you
wish to have your book delivered at the meet, please indicate. We
encourage this option.

Please contact me off-list if you have any difficulties downloading the
PDF or require additional information. We thank you!
Regards,
Ed Hawkins & Pat Wider



Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Mark Feddersen wrote:
Speaking of war emergency boxcars, does anybody know why Intermountain chose to paint the roof of their C&NW version gray? As far as I know they were the same box car red as the rest of the car and the Viking roofs were not galvanized. Can anybody shed some light on this or is this another Intermountain goof?
I have no idea what color those C&NW roofs may have been, but I'd sure be surprised if the Viking roofing was not galvanized. That had been essentially standard since the 1920s and was extensively used even before WW I.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Ed Hawkins
 

On Oct 7, 2009, at 11:14 PM, Anthony Thompson wrote:

Mark Feddersen wrote:
> Speaking of war emergency boxcars, does anybody know why
> Intermountain chose to paint the roof of their C&NW version gray? As
> far as I know they were the same box car red as the rest of the car
> and the Viking roofs were not galvanized. Can anybody shed some
> light on this or is this another Intermountain goof?

I have no idea what color those C&NW roofs may have been, but
I'd sure be surprised if the Viking roofing was not galvanized. That
had been essentially standard since the 1920s and was extensively used
even before WW I.

Mark and Tony,
The Viking roofs on the CNW emergency box cars were indeed galvanized.
Also, I believe InterMountain made a good decision on the roof color
based on available data (see below). InterMountain could have gone the
easier route and painted the roof the same as the rest of the body.
That would have eliminated a masking step and saved cost. Instead, IM
masked the car so that the roof could be painted what is thought to be
a legitimate color based on interpretation of source data by multiple
people, including noted CNW freight car historian Jeff Koeller.

I have the original bill of materials for the CNW cars built by
Pullman-Standard having the Viking roofs. I scanned and sent a copy of
the paint specs to both InterMountain and Jeff so they had actual
documentation from which to base a decision. In the paint
specifications it designates the outside of the roof and running boards
as being painted with two coats of Sherwin-Williams #21572 or equal
Galvanized Roof Paint.

Naturally, the discussion then led to "OK, now what color is
"galvanized roof paint?" Ultimately it was decided that the color
should be a shade of gray somewhat matching that of the galvanized roof
itself. Everyone is free to debate the conclusion, but the decision was
made with a great deal of thought. The sides, ends, and trucks of the
cars received CNW #1 paint "redish-brown in color." Underframes were
coated with black car cement. White stencils.

I have been known to criticize some of InterMountain's models when
think the criticism is valid and deserved, In this case, IF a mistake
in the roof color was made, I wouldn't characterize it "another
InterMountain goof" since a great deal of discussion and thought went
into the decision.

The Viking Roof specification in Pullman-Standard lot no. 5752 called
for roof sheets #16 U.S. Ga. C.B. Galvanized. Standard Railway
Equipment Manufacturing Co. drawing 7R-2650-C. The P-S drawing list
gives the general arrangement drawing no. 58215-C. It's quite possible
this drawing is in the Pullman collection at the Illinois Railway
Museum.

At the same time AC&F built emergency box cars for CNW (and one car for
CMO), and the bill of materials for the galvanized Murphy roofs on
these cars specified them as unpainted. Hope this helps.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


barrybennetttoo <Barrybennetttoo@...>
 

Having used so-called 'galvanising paint' in the past I can state that the
stuff I used was a light metallic grey colour. I distinctly remember
thinking to myself at the first time I used it 'this looks nothing like
galvanised metal'.



The colour, when it dried, was a shade or two darker than the typical colour
we use for covered hoppers. In my minds eye I see a 3/4 photo of a covered
hopper in young Mr Hawkins articles in Railmodel Journal which was
described as being of a similar shade to that which I remeber.



Barry Bennett

Coventry, England.

-------Original Message-------



From: Ed Hawkins

Date: 08/10/2009 05:18:58

To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com

Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Railway Prototype Cyclopedia Vol. 19





On Oct 7, 2009, at 11:14 PM, Anthony Thompson wrote:



Mark Feddersen wrote:
Speaking of war emergency boxcars, does anybody know why
Intermountain chose to paint the roof of their C&NW version gray? As
far as I know they were the same box car red as the rest of the car
and the Viking roofs were not galvanized. Can anybody shed some
light on this or is this another Intermountain goof?
I have no idea what color those C&NW roofs may have been, but
I'd sure be surprised if the Viking roofing was not galvanized. That
had been essentially standard since the 1920s and was extensively used
even before WW I.


Mark and Tony,

The Viking roofs on the CNW emergency box cars were indeed galvanized.

Also, I believe InterMountain made a good decision on the roof color

based on available data (see below). InterMountain could have gone the

easier route and painted the roof the same as the rest of the body.

That would have eliminated a masking step and saved cost. Instead, IM

masked the car so that the roof could be painted what is thought to be

a legitimate color based on interpretation of source data by multiple

people, including noted CNW freight car historian Jeff Koeller.



I have the original bill of materials for the CNW cars built by

Pullman-Standard having the Viking roofs. I scanned and sent a copy of

the paint specs to both InterMountain and Jeff so they had actual

documentation from which to base a decision. In the paint

specifications it designates the outside of the roof and running boards

as being painted with two coats of Sherwin-Williams #21572 or equal

Galvanized Roof Paint.



Naturally, the discussion then led to "OK, now what color is

"galvanized roof paint?" Ultimately it was decided that the color

should be a shade of gray somewhat matching that of the galvanized roof

itself. Everyone is free to debate the conclusion, but the decision was

made with a great deal of thought. The sides, ends, and trucks of the

cars received CNW #1 paint "redish-brown in color." Underframes were

coated with black car cement. White stencils.



I have been known to criticize some of InterMountain's models when

think the criticism is valid and deserved, In this case, IF a mistake

in the roof color was made, I wouldn't characterize it "another

InterMountain goof" since a great deal of discussion and thought went

into the decision.



The Viking Roof specification in Pullman-Standard lot no. 5752 called

for roof sheets #16 U.S. Ga. C.B. Galvanized. Standard Railway

Equipment Manufacturing Co. drawing 7R-2650-C. The P-S drawing list

gives the general arrangement drawing no. 58215-C. It's quite possible

this drawing is in the Pullman collection at the Illinois Railway

Museum.



At the same time AC&F built emergency box cars for CNW (and one car for

CMO), and the bill of materials for the galvanized Murphy roofs on

these cars specified them as unpainted. Hope this helps.

Regards,

Ed Hawkins


Tim O'Connor
 

I have a color photo of a C&NW Viking roofed box car and it
appears that the roof was unpainted galvanized metal but has
gradually oxidized (rusted). There appears to be no paint on
the APEX running board either (CNW #77866). The "seam caps"
have the same appearance as the rest of the roof, partially
oxidized, so this makes me think they were initially also
not painted. By contrast, many other roofs show painted
seam caps that contrast with the unpainted roof panels.

For some reason, finding overhead shots of Viking roof cars
in color has been difficult!

Tim O'Connor

Mark and Tony,

The Viking roofs on the CNW emergency box cars were indeed galvanized.
Also, I believe InterMountain made a good decision on the roof color
based on available data (see below). InterMountain could have gone the
easier route and painted the roof the same as the rest of the body.
That would have eliminated a masking step and saved cost. Instead, IM
masked the car so that the roof could be painted what is thought to be
a legitimate color based on interpretation of source data by multiple
people, including noted CNW freight car historian Jeff Koeller.

I have the original bill of materials for the CNW cars built by
Pullman-Standard having the Viking roofs. I scanned and sent a copy of
the paint specs to both InterMountain and Jeff so they had actual
documentation from which to base a decision. In the paint
specifications it designates the outside of the roof and running boards
as being painted with two coats of Sherwin-Williams #21572 or equal
Galvanized Roof Paint.

Naturally, the discussion then led to "OK, now what color is
"galvanized roof paint?" Ultimately it was decided that the color
should be a shade of gray somewhat matching that of the galvanized roof
itself. Everyone is free to debate the conclusion, but the decision was
made with a great deal of thought. The sides, ends, and trucks of the
cars received CNW #1 paint "redish-brown in color." Underframes were
coated with black car cement. White stencils.

I have been known to criticize some of InterMountain's models when
think the criticism is valid and deserved, In this case, IF a mistake
in the roof color was made, I wouldn't characterize it "another
InterMountain goof" since a great deal of discussion and thought went
into the decision.

The Viking Roof specification in Pullman-Standard lot no. 5752 called
for roof sheets #16 U.S. Ga. C.B. Galvanized. Standard Railway
Equipment Manufacturing Co. drawing 7R-2650-C. The P-S drawing list
gives the general arrangement drawing no. 58215-C. It's quite possible
this drawing is in the Pullman collection at the Illinois Railway
Museum.

At the same time AC&F built emergency box cars for CNW (and one car for
CMO), and the bill of materials for the galvanized Murphy roofs on
these cars specified them as unpainted. Hope this helps.

Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Tim O'Connor
 

Galvanized metal is very shiny when new, but quickly oxidizes to a
light gray, then darker gray as it ages.

I have not seen the Intermountain model but it sounds like they tried
to replicate the paint you describe.

My question now is, how common was the use of "galvanizing paint" vs
unpainted galvanized metal? And does the use of the paint imply that
the roof was not actually galvanized, but was only painted that way?

Tim O'Connor

Having used so-called 'galvanising paint' in the past I can state that the
stuff I used was a light metallic grey colour. I distinctly remember
thinking to myself at the first time I used it 'this looks nothing like
galvanised metal'.

The colour, when it dried, was a shade or two darker than the typical colour
we use for covered hoppers. In my minds eye I see a 3/4 photo of a covered
hopper in young Mr Hawkins articles in Railmodel Journal which was
described as being of a similar shade to that which I remeber.

Barry Bennett
Coventry, England.


Steve SANDIFER
 

My model placed in Kansas had lots of galvanized metal buildings - barns, grain elevators, etc. I paint the models with Floquil primer as a base and then use alcohol/India ink washes to get the aged look. It works well. That may be the trick for these cars. I don't know of any paint that out of the bottle looks right.

----------------------------------------------------------------
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@sbcglobal.net
Home: 12027 Mulholland Dr., Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX
77025, 713-667-9417
Personal: http://www.geocities.com/stevesandifer2000/index
Church: http://www.swcentral.org

----- Original Message -----
From: barrybennetttoo
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, October 08, 2009 5:48 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Railway Prototype Cyclopedia Vol. 19


Having used so-called 'galvanising paint' in the past I can state that the
stuff I used was a light metallic grey colour. I distinctly remember
thinking to myself at the first time I used it 'this looks nothing like
galvanised metal'.

The colour, when it dried, was a shade or two darker than the typical colour
we use for covered hoppers. In my minds eye I see a 3/4 photo of a covered
hopper in young Mr Hawkins articles in Railmodel Journal which was
described as being of a similar shade to that which I remeber.

Barry Bennett

Coventry, England.

-------Original Message-------

From: Ed Hawkins

Date: 08/10/2009 05:18:58

To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com

Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Railway Prototype Cyclopedia Vol. 19

On Oct 7, 2009, at 11:14 PM, Anthony Thompson wrote:

> Mark Feddersen wrote:

> > Speaking of war emergency boxcars, does anybody know why

> > Intermountain chose to paint the roof of their C&NW version gray? As

> > far as I know they were the same box car red as the rest of the car

> > and the Viking roofs were not galvanized. Can anybody shed some

> > light on this or is this another Intermountain goof?

>

> I have no idea what color those C&NW roofs may have been, but

> I'd sure be surprised if the Viking roofing was not galvanized. That

> had been essentially standard since the 1920s and was extensively used

> even before WW I.

Mark and Tony,

The Viking roofs on the CNW emergency box cars were indeed galvanized.

Also, I believe InterMountain made a good decision on the roof color

based on available data (see below). InterMountain could have gone the

easier route and painted the roof the same as the rest of the body.

That would have eliminated a masking step and saved cost. Instead, IM

masked the car so that the roof could be painted what is thought to be

a legitimate color based on interpretation of source data by multiple

people, including noted CNW freight car historian Jeff Koeller.

I have the original bill of materials for the CNW cars built by

Pullman-Standard having the Viking roofs. I scanned and sent a copy of

the paint specs to both InterMountain and Jeff so they had actual

documentation from which to base a decision. In the paint

specifications it designates the outside of the roof and running boards

as being painted with two coats of Sherwin-Williams #21572 or equal

Galvanized Roof Paint.

Naturally, the discussion then led to "OK, now what color is

"galvanized roof paint?" Ultimately it was decided that the color

should be a shade of gray somewhat matching that of the galvanized roof

itself. Everyone is free to debate the conclusion, but the decision was

made with a great deal of thought. The sides, ends, and trucks of the

cars received CNW #1 paint "redish-brown in color." Underframes were

coated with black car cement. White stencils.

I have been known to criticize some of InterMountain's models when

think the criticism is valid and deserved, In this case, IF a mistake

in the roof color was made, I wouldn't characterize it "another

InterMountain goof" since a great deal of discussion and thought went

into the decision.

The Viking Roof specification in Pullman-Standard lot no. 5752 called

for roof sheets #16 U.S. Ga. C.B. Galvanized. Standard Railway

Equipment Manufacturing Co. drawing 7R-2650-C. The P-S drawing list

gives the general arrangement drawing no. 58215-C. It's quite possible

this drawing is in the Pullman collection at the Illinois Railway

Museum.

At the same time AC&F built emergency box cars for CNW (and one car for

CMO), and the bill of materials for the galvanized Murphy roofs on

these cars specified them as unpainted. Hope this helps.

Regards,

Ed Hawkins


William Sharpe <wsharpe1@...>
 

Hi Ed;
Thank you for the heads up on RPC Volume 19. I will be sending my
remittance to you in the mail today and would like to receive my copy from
you at Naperville. I look forward to seeing you then.
Bill

William H. Sharpe
Hamilton, Ontario

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ed
Hawkins
Sent: Wednesday, October 07, 2009 7:48 PM
To: STMFC Discussion Group
Subject: [STMFC] Railway Prototype Cyclopedia Vol. 19

STMFC Group,
The RP CYC Publishing Company is pleased to announce the imminent
release of RAILWAY PROTOTYPE CYCLOPEDIA, Volume 19, scheduled for
distribution beginning in the last week of October 2009. Volume 19
contains much useful prototype and scale modeling information: 149
black & white and color photographs, 31 diagrams, and 4 tables for a
total of 113 pages comprising three in-depth articles on the following
subjects:

1. Emergency Composite Box Cars by Patrick C. Wider (50 pages). The
article is the fourth in a series that cover American box car designs
that were built in large quantities during the first half of the 20th
Century. The author covers the single-sheathed and plywood-sheathed 40'
and 50' emergency box cars constructed during World War II following
restrictions imposed by the War Production Board.

2. Erie 40-Ton Express Milk Cars by Patrick C. Wider (10 pages). The
author describes and illustrates the unique Erie express milk cars
built during the 1930s by the Greenville Steel Car Company. Also
discussed and illustrated are some of the cars converted for express
baggage service.

3. The Family of All-Welded 70-Ton 52'-6" Drop-End Gondola Cars Based
on PRR's Class G31 by Ed Hawkins (53 pages). The article covers an
interesting group of subject cars first built by the Pennsylvania
Railroad (Class G31) in 1948-1950, followed in the 1950s with
derivatives built by American Car & Foundry and Pullman-Standard for
Pennsy, Atlantic Coast Line, Birmingham Southern, Delaware & Hudson,
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, Southern Pacific, Wabash, Sacramento
Northern, and Western Pacific.

We appreciate your support and extend to you a pre-publication offer
for Volume 19. The normal retail price for Volume 19 is $29.95.
However, your cost is only $24.00 (postpaid to addresses in the U.S.) -
a 20-percent discount. But here's the catch! Your payment must be
postmarked by October 24, 2009 for this offer to be valid. Mail orders
with postmarks after this date will not be honored.

To take advantage of this one-time, pre-publication offer for RP CYC
Volume 19, please send a check or money order in the amount of $24.00
by October 24, 2009 to:

RP CYC Publishing Co.
P.O. Box 451
Chesterfield, MO 63006-0451

Missouri residents must add $1.85 state & local sales tax ($25.85 total
amount).

For single book orders to Canada, please add $5.79, and for single book
orders to all other countries please add $12.28 (Air Mail).

Internet users: Please visit our new web site address:
http://www.rpcycpub.com. A flyer with summary information in PDF format
can be downloaded at: http://www.rpcycpub.com/v19_flyer.pdf

For those attending the Naperville Prototype Modelers Seminar, if you
wish to have your book delivered at the meet, please indicate. We
encourage this option.

Please contact me off-list if you have any difficulties downloading the
PDF or require additional information. We thank you!
Regards,
Ed Hawkins & Pat Wider





------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Schuyler Larrabee
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor

Galvanized metal is very shiny when new, but quickly oxidizes to a
light gray, then darker gray as it ages.

Many of you must have some house or business in the neighborhood whose gutters and downspouts are
not painted. Those are galvanized, and turn dark, even, flat gray.

SGL





E-mail message checked by Spyware Doctor (6.1.0.447)
Database version: 6.13440
http://www.pctools.com/en/spyware-doctor-antivirus/


Mansell Peter Hambly
 

Mr. Hawkins:

I've just returned from purchasing a postal money order in the amount of $41.37 in US$'s for Volume 19. The additional $11.58 are for two previous orders that did not include enough for postage to Canada. Thank you.

Mansell

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ed Hawkins" <hawk0621@sbcglobal.net>
To: "STMFC Discussion Group" <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, October 07, 2009 4:48 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Railway Prototype Cyclopedia Vol. 19


STMFC Group,
The RP CYC Publishing Company is pleased to announce the imminent
release of RAILWAY PROTOTYPE CYCLOPEDIA, Volume 19, scheduled for
distribution beginning in the last week of October 2009. Volume 19
contains much useful prototype and scale modeling information: 149
black & white and color photographs, 31 diagrams, and 4 tables for a
total of 113 pages comprising three in-depth articles on the following
subjects:

1. Emergency Composite Box Cars by Patrick C. Wider (50 pages). The
article is the fourth in a series that cover American box car designs
that were built in large quantities during the first half of the 20th
Century. The author covers the single-sheathed and plywood-sheathed 40'
and 50' emergency box cars constructed during World War II following
restrictions imposed by the War Production Board.

2. Erie 40-Ton Express Milk Cars by Patrick C. Wider (10 pages). The
author describes and illustrates the unique Erie express milk cars
built during the 1930s by the Greenville Steel Car Company. Also
discussed and illustrated are some of the cars converted for express
baggage service.

3. The Family of All-Welded 70-Ton 52'-6" Drop-End Gondola Cars Based
on PRR's Class G31 by Ed Hawkins (53 pages). The article covers an
interesting group of subject cars first built by the Pennsylvania
Railroad (Class G31) in 1948-1950, followed in the 1950s with
derivatives built by American Car & Foundry and Pullman-Standard for
Pennsy, Atlantic Coast Line, Birmingham Southern, Delaware & Hudson,
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, Southern Pacific, Wabash, Sacramento
Northern, and Western Pacific.

We appreciate your support and extend to you a pre-publication offer
for Volume 19. The normal retail price for Volume 19 is $29.95.
However, your cost is only $24.00 (postpaid to addresses in the U.S.) -
a 20-percent discount. But here's the catch! Your payment must be
postmarked by October 24, 2009 for this offer to be valid. Mail orders
with postmarks after this date will not be honored.

To take advantage of this one-time, pre-publication offer for RP CYC
Volume 19, please send a check or money order in the amount of $24.00
by October 24, 2009 to:

RP CYC Publishing Co.
P.O. Box 451
Chesterfield, MO 63006-0451

Missouri residents must add $1.85 state & local sales tax ($25.85 total
amount).

For single book orders to Canada, please add $5.79, and for single book
orders to all other countries please add $12.28 (Air Mail).

Internet users: Please visit our new web site address:
http://www.rpcycpub.com. A flyer with summary information in PDF format
can be downloaded at: http://www.rpcycpub.com/v19_flyer.pdf

For those attending the Naperville Prototype Modelers Seminar, if you
wish to have your book delivered at the meet, please indicate. We
encourage this option.

Please contact me off-list if you have any difficulties downloading the
PDF or require additional information. We thank you!
Regards,
Ed Hawkins & Pat Wider





------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links