Topics

Coke questions


asychis@...
 

If one wanted to model coke, say to fill the Walthers coke containers, what
material would one use, and what color would it be? Thanks!

Jerry Michels


Eric Hiser <ehiser@...>
 

If one wanted to model coke, say to fill the Walthers coke containers, what
material would one use, and what color would it be? Thanks!

Jerry Michels

Jerry:
Coke is usually a light grey, silvery color, at least from the old
beehive or the more modern non-recovery systems (you didn't specify era). I
am less sure about coke from a byproduct plant.

Eric Hiser
Phoenix, AZ


Tim O'Connor
 

Petroleum coke is a dark, inky black and is "fine" material. I'll
go with Eric on coal coke until someone comes up with a color photo :-)

If you want to see coke go to Google news and look at yesterday's
derailment in Houston -- hopper cars of coke all over the highway!

Tim O'Connor

At 11/24/2009 01:54 PM Tuesday, you wrote:
If one wanted to model coke, say to fill the Walthers coke containers, what
material would one use, and what color would it be? Thanks!

Jerry Michels

Jerry:
Coke is usually a light grey, silvery color, at least from the old
beehive or the more modern non-recovery systems (you didn't specify era). I
am less sure about coke from a byproduct plant.

Eric Hiser
Phoenix, AZ


Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Hiser" <ehiser@...> wrote:

If one wanted to model coke, say to fill the Walthers coke containers, what
material would one use, and what color would it be? Thanks!

Jerry Michels

Jerry:
Coke is usually a light grey, silvery color, at least from the old
beehive or the more modern non-recovery systems (you didn't specify era). I
am less sure about coke from a byproduct plant.

Eric Hiser
Phoenix, AZ
I wouldn't say silvery... it's not shiney at all, and nowhere near that light in color. I remember handling it for my neighbor's forge when I was a kid. If I had to match it for color, I'd say somewhere between Floquil Grimy Black and a photographer's 18% gray card (anyone still use those things?)

If I had to build a load, I'd use scale coal or ballast and spray paint it with a dead flat dark gray., maybe a dark gray automotive primer from a spray bomb.


Tim O'Connor
 

So... you think a dark gray ballast (basalt rock) from AZ-Rock would do?
Is HO scale ballast about the right size for coke?

(I'm asking because I just finished my B&O O-27 gondola w/ coke containers
and I was wondering if I should just leave them empty...)

Tim O'Connor

Jerry:
Coke is usually a light grey, silvery color, at least from the old
beehive or the more modern non-recovery systems (you didn't specify era). I
am less sure about coke from a byproduct plant.

Eric Hiser
Phoenix, AZ
I wouldn't say silvery... it's not shiney at all, and nowhere near that light in color. I remember handling it for my neighbor's forge when I was a kid. If I had to match it for color, I'd say somewhere between Floquil Grimy Black and a photographer's 18% gray card (anyone still use those things?)

If I had to build a load, I'd use scale coal or ballast and spray paint it with a dead flat dark gray., maybe a dark gray automotive primer from a spray bomb.


Jack Burgess
 

There is a photo of coke fuel on Wikipedia at

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coke_%28fuel%29


Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Jason Greene
 

I used to work at one of the by-products plants here in Birmingham. The size is not the same as ballast. The lumps are generally between a softball and football in size. As for the color, it depends on coal it is coked from. Alabama coal leaves you with a darker coke than PA or KY coal. Generally though I would say to start with grimy black and lighten it just a bit. I do not have a color photo unfortunately.

I can tell you that black coke hoppers or gons should weather with a grayish black dust, ask anyone who has seen one of my trucks...My wife hated that place when I would come home with a nasty truck.

As for Bee-hive ovens, if you are modeling steel mills, iron furnaces, or coke ovens you will not be dealing with these unless you were modeling pre-1920 or so. This is the time period when the bee-hives were completely replaced by bee-hives. The "modern" ovens came about during that time.

If more information were available about the Mary Lee, Alabama Consolidated Co. and Sloss-Sheffield railroad equipment pre-diesel era, I would be tempted to model the Mary Lee instead of the Southern Rwy. Very interesting railroad.

Jason Greene
Birmingham, AL

If you can't fix it with a hammer, you've got an electrical problem


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Jason Greene wrote:
As for Bee-hive ovens, if you are modeling steel mills, iron furnaces, or coke ovens you will not be dealing with these unless you were modeling pre-1920 or so. This is the time period when the bee-hives were completely replaced . . .
Certainly not true everywhere, Jason. Beehives were still in use in West Virginia as late as WW II, maybe later.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


mcindoefalls
 

I have a hunk o' coke I picked up along the tracks years ago, and it's quite porous and a medium gray color, like charcoal, I'd say. The piece is about four inches by six inches by three inches or so. So maybe O scale ballast would work?

Walt Lankenau

So... you think a dark gray ballast (basalt rock) from AZ-Rock would do?
Is HO scale ballast about the right size for coke?

(I'm asking because I just finished my B&O O-27 gondola w/ coke containers
and I was wondering if I should just leave them empty...)

Tim O'Connor



Jerry:
Coke is usually a light grey, silvery color, at least from the old
beehive or the more modern non-recovery systems (you didn't specify era). I
am less sure about coke from a byproduct plant.

Eric Hiser
Phoenix, AZ
I wouldn't say silvery... it's not shiney at all, and nowhere near that light in color. I remember handling it for my neighbor's forge when I was a kid. If I had to match it for color, I'd say somewhere between Floquil Grimy Black and a photographer's 18% gray card (anyone still use those things?)

If I had to build a load, I'd use scale coal or ballast and spray paint it with a dead flat dark gray., maybe a dark gray automotive primer from a spray bomb.


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Dennis S. wrote:
I wouldn't say silvery... it's not shiney at all, and nowhere near that light in color. I remember handling it for my neighbor's forge when I was a kid. If I had to match it for color, I'd say somewhere between Floquil Grimy Black and a photographer's 18% gray card (anyone still use those things?)
I'd agree about the gray scale, and certainly it isn't metallic at all, but to call the typical coke sheen "silvery" seems about right to me. It is most certainly not a flat gray. Not sure how to model it believably.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Jason Greene <jason.p.greene@...> wrote:

I used to work at one of the by-products plants here in Birmingham. The size is not the same as ballast. The lumps are generally between a softball and football in size. As for the color, it depends on coal it is coked from. Alabama coal leaves you with a darker coke than PA or KY coal. Generally though I would say to start with grimy black and lighten it just a bit. I do not have a color photo unfortunately.
Yeah, I should have expanded on that. Pet coke is almost pure carbon, and is very black, but coaking coal takes out all the volitals, but leaves the ash (other non-carbon mineral content). So, whatever the ash content of the coal, it all ends up in the coke, which makes it a lighter gray.

As for size, no one specified what the coke was to be used for. If for retail sale (coke was sold for home heating and stove coal in areas where Anthracite shipping would be costly) it would be graded like coal was. If for steel making, I assume it was random sizes as it came from the ovens.

Dennis


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Dennis S. wrote:
As for size, no one specified what the coke was to be used for. If for retail sale (coke was sold for home heating and stove coal in areas where Anthracite shipping would be costly) it would be graded like coal was. If for steel making, I assume it was random sizes as it came from the ovens.
Good point. My observation when I lived in Pittsburgh was that the coke coming out of US Steel's Clairton coke works (one of the largest in the country) looked a lot like typical coal chunks as to size, but was immediately recognizable as coke due to the gray color and "silvery" appearance in certain lighting. I'd assume this was steelmaking coke.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Tim O'Connor
 

Start with ground up schist?

Tim O'

I'd agree about the gray scale, and certainly it isn't metallic at
all, but to call the typical coke sheen "silvery" seems about right to
me. It is most certainly not a flat gray. Not sure how to model it
believably.

Tony Thompson


Jason Greene
 

The picture of the coke ovens in South Wales on the Wiki page is identical to those at the Jim Walter site at North Birmingham, AL.

Jason Greene
Birmingham, AL

If you can't fix it with a hammer, you've got an electrical problem


boyds1949 <E27ca@...>
 

Beehive ovens were still in operation at Shoaf, Pa in February 1970. Shoaf is located south of Uniontown on a B&O branch which connected to B&O's Connellsville to Fairmont line at Smithfield. I came across the place on a cloudy damp winter day and the smoke (there was plenty of it) was hanging close to the ground.

John King

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Jason Greene <jason.p.greene@...> wrote:

I used to work at one of the by-products plants here in Birmingham. The size is not the same as ballast. The lumps are generally between a softball and football in size. As for the color, it depends on coal it is coked from. Alabama coal leaves you with a darker coke than PA or KY coal. Generally though I would say to start with grimy black and lighten it just a bit. I do not have a color photo unfortunately.

I can tell you that black coke hoppers or gons should weather with a grayish black dust, ask anyone who has seen one of my trucks...My wife hated that place when I would come home with a nasty truck.

As for Bee-hive ovens, if you are modeling steel mills, iron furnaces, or coke ovens you will not be dealing with these unless you were modeling pre-1920 or so. This is the time period when the bee-hives were completely replaced by bee-hives. The "modern" ovens came about during that time.

If more information were available about the Mary Lee, Alabama Consolidated Co. and Sloss-Sheffield railroad equipment pre-diesel era, I would be tempted to model the Mary Lee instead of the Southern Rwy. Very interesting railroad.

Jason Greene
Birmingham, AL

If you can't fix it with a hammer, you've got an electrical problem


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


major_denis_bloodnok <smokeandsteam@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:
... was immediately recognizable as coke due to the gray color
and "silvery" appearance in certain lighting. I'd assume this was
steelmaking coke.
I'd a gree that there is a certain metallic sheen to many types of coke, but this tends to disappear when it is seen in bulk.

If you want to model coke loads I have had success by dying Woodland Scenics Talus with thinned black Indian ink. This gives a slightly grey finish and simulates the appearance of a load of coke pretty well, though it does not bear up so well when scrutinised at the level of the individual lump

HTH

Aidrian Bridgeman-Sutton
Ramona CA