Holiday Greetings


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Along with conventional holiday greetings, I'd like to wish everyone a happy December 21. An enduring memory of my childhood is my dad's invariable comment on the 21st, "Now the days start getting longer!"

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Joseph
 

First day of spring!!
joe binish

----- Original Message -----
From: "Anthony Thompson" <thompson@signaturepress.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>; "Espee List" <Espee@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Monday, December 21, 2009 3:45 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Holiday Greetings


Along with conventional holiday greetings, I'd like to wish everyone a happy December 21. An enduring memory of my childhood is my dad's invariable comment on the 21st, "Now the days start getting longer!"
Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history
------------------------------------
Yahoo! Groups Links


Bruce Smith
 

Joe, the first day of spring is the vernal equinox, when the day and
night are each 12 hours. December 21st is the winter solstice, the
shortest day of the year. This is of course all relevant to steam era
freight cars because it was the railroads that invented "standard time"
<G>. Otherwise time, and therefore length of day, was determined at
each location...

So a joyous solstice to all of you out there and especially you
druids...

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

"joe binish" <binish6@q.com> 12/21/09 3:56 PM >>>
First day of spring!!
joe binish
----- Original Message -----
From: "Anthony Thompson" <thompson@signaturepress.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>; "Espee List" <Espee@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Monday, December 21, 2009 3:45 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Holiday Greetings


Along with conventional holiday greetings, I'd like to wish
everyone a happy December 21. An enduring memory of my childhood is my
dad's invariable comment on the 21st, "Now the days start getting
longer!"

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail,
thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Charlie Vlk
 

Bruce-
While railroads did indeed invent "standard time" I don't think the length of a day was determined
at each location........ the speed at which the earth rotates was not subject to local regulation..... just
the indexing of clock time in relation to it.
..... and AFAIK this did not make any local time zone better than another for taking freight car photos.
<G>
Charlie Vlk



Joe, the first day of spring is the vernal equinox, when the day and
night are each 12 hours. December 21st is the winter solstice, the
shortest day of the year. This is of course all relevant to steam era
freight cars because it was the railroads that invented "standard time"
<G>. Otherwise time, and therefore length of day, was determined at
each location...

So a joyous solstice to all of you out there and especially you
druids...

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Tim O'Connor
 

Harruumph!

I protest against this hemispherical chauvinism! For some freight
cars in this world, Dec 21st is the LONGEST day of the year.

Tim O'Connor

At 12/21/2009 05:30 PM Monday, you wrote:
Joe, the first day of spring is the vernal equinox, when the day and
night are each 12 hours. December 21st is the winter solstice, the
shortest day of the year. This is of course all relevant to steam era
freight cars because it was the railroads that invented "standard time"
<G>. Otherwise time, and therefore length of day, was determined at
each location...

So a joyous solstice to all of you out there and especially you
druids...

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Viv Brice
 

Right on, Tim.
Happy holidays from Down Under
Viv Brice

_____

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tim
O'Connor
Sent: Tuesday, 22 December 2009 4:36 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Holiday Greetings




Harruumph!

I protest against this hemispherical chauvinism! For some freight
cars in this world, Dec 21st is the LONGEST day of the year.

Tim O'Connor

At 12/21/2009 05:30 PM Monday, you wrote:
Joe, the first day of spring is the vernal equinox, when the day and
night are each 12 hours. December 21st is the winter solstice, the
shortest day of the year. This is of course all relevant to steam era
freight cars because it was the railroads that invented "standard time"
<G>. Otherwise time, and therefore length of day, was determined at
each location...

So a joyous solstice to all of you out there and especially you
druids...

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


John Riddell <jriddell@...>
 

Charlie,

Wasn't Sandford Fleming the inventor of standard time, rather than the
railroads ?
The railroads simply adopted his invention (- to facilitate better freight
car usage - STMFC content.)

http://inventors.about.com/od/fstartinventors/a/SandfordFleming.htm

John Riddell


railwayman <stevelucas3@...>
 

Oh, and by the way, for years I'd thought that Sir Sandford Fleming had invented "standard time". ;)

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Viv Brice" <viv.brice@...> wrote:

Right on, Tim.
Happy holidays from Down Under
Viv Brice

_____

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tim
O'Connor
Sent: Tuesday, 22 December 2009 4:36 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Holiday Greetings




Harruumph!

I protest against this hemispherical chauvinism! For some freight
cars in this world, Dec 21st is the LONGEST day of the year.

Tim O'Connor

At 12/21/2009 05:30 PM Monday, you wrote:
Joe, the first day of spring is the vernal equinox, when the day and
night are each 12 hours. December 21st is the winter solstice, the
shortest day of the year. This is of course all relevant to steam era
freight cars because it was the railroads that invented "standard time"
<G>. Otherwise time, and therefore length of day, was determined at
each location...

So a joyous solstice to all of you out there and especially you
druids...

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL





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