Haskell & Barker 1913 Gondola


Paul Hillman
 

The Chicago & Western Indiana RR had several Haskell & Barker, 40 ft, Wood Side-Dump gondolas. Some were still in use in 1960.

#1185, built in 1913, was at the Illinois Railway Museum the last I saw. (Poor condition)

Does any company make, at least a close HO model of these cars. Can't find any yet in my searching.

Thanks, Paul Hillman


Ray Breyer
 

The Chicago & Western Indiana RR
had several Haskell & Barker, 40 ft, Wood Side-Dump
gondolas. Some were still in use in 1960.
#1185, built in 1913, was at the Illinois Railway Museum
the last I saw. (Poor condition)
Does any company make, at least a close HO model of these
cars. Can't find any yet in my searching.
Thanks, Paul Hillman

Hi Paul,

Try F&C kit 6800:

http://www.fandckits.com/HOFreight/6800.html

Regards,
Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


Jack Burgess
 

<The Chicago & Western Indiana RR had several Haskell & Barker, 40 ft,
<Wood Side-Dump gondolas. Some were still in use in 1960.
<
<#1185, built in 1913, was at the Illinois Railway Museum the last I saw.
<(Poor condition)
<
<Does any company make, at least a close HO model of these cars. Can't
<find any yet in my searching.
<
<Thanks, Paul Hillman

Paul...

Protowestmodels has been working on a resin kit for a convertible ballast
car for the past year or so based on CAD drawings I supplied to them. I've
now got a set of resin castings for the body and it looks very good (I
haven't seen F&C's car). It is a one-piece casting for the sides and bottom
with separate pieces to model the floor as either flat or up against the
sides for dropping material between the rails. They told me that they will
also be providing castings for the 5'-3" wheelbase arch bar trucks (I hope
so). The last word I got from them is that the kit should be available in
April...


Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


tedander2000
 

If interested in original drawings for the 1913 gondola, contact us at the IRM Pullman Library. We can check the Haskell & Barker drawing collection in the archive, filed by date, and see if drawings are there. Contact me off group, or send a request to:
Pullman Library, Illinois Railway Museum, P. O. Box 427,
Union, IL 60180.
There are a number of unusual car drawings including the WP caboose with cupola mounted tail light now at the Western Railway Museum. Anyone for doing a poultry car complete with caretaker's "suite", its door in car center between the cages? We can supply detail down to the hand operated side and roof vents from the suite. Also there is a later poultry car from the Standard Steel Car drawings.
Sincerely, Ted Anderson, curator

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "behillman" <chris_hillman@...> wrote:

The Chicago & Western Indiana RR had several Haskell & Barker, 40 ft, Wood Side-Dump gondolas. Some were still in use in 1960.

#1185, built in 1913, was at the Illinois Railway Museum the last I saw. (Poor condition)

Does any company make, at least a close HO model of these cars. Can't find any yet in my searching.

Thanks, Paul Hillman


Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "behillman" <chris_hillman@...> wrote:

The Chicago & Western Indiana RR had several Haskell & Barker, 40 ft, Wood Side-Dump gondolas. Some were still in use in 1960.

#1185, built in 1913, was at the Illinois Railway Museum the last I saw. (Poor condition)

Does any company make, at least a close HO model of these cars. Can't find any yet in my searching.

Thanks, Paul Hillman
Those C&WI side door gons are Hart convertible ballast cars, built under license of the Rogers Ballast Car Co. It seems most Rodgers cars were built by AC&F, but not these.

IRM has a second one;C&WI 1904, the boom tender flat on the C&WI wrecking crane 1900 is the frame from one of these cars. When the cars arrived at the museum neither car had its center hopper; both cars were decked with solid planks, but both have a needle beam arrangement that is designed to dodge the hopper. These cars had removable ends, and were designed for use with a ballast plow. In this service the plow was placed on the last car in the string, and acable run across all the cars to the front of the string. The ballast (or fill material for widening embankments) was piled over the cable. At the dumping site, the cars were uncoupled from the locomotive and the side doors unlocked. The cable was then attached to the locomotive, which pulled the plow along the tops of the string of cars, pushing the ballast out through the side doors. Later designs made this sort of unloading system obsolete.

Illustrations of Hart gondolas show up in nearly every edition of the Car Builder's Dictionary / Cyclopedia, but trying to pin down the design is like tying to hit a moving target, as while the design evolved rapidly during the first decades of the twentieth century, the company ran the same illustrations in the Cyc. for years on end. I'm sure Jack's drawings are correct for the YVRR cars, but may not be for other roads.

Dennis


Jack Burgess
 

Dennis wrote in part:
< I'm sure Jack's
<drawings are correct for the YVRR cars, but may not be for other roads.

Hard to say. My plans are for a 36 Ft, 40 ton ballast car. My source (in
addition to a few photos) was a copy of some original plans that I got from
the North and North Western Historical Society....the title of the plan
sheet is "Rodger Ballast Convertible Ballast - Class CS"...


Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


David Turner
 

I took detailed photos, especially of the side-door latching hardware,
of the car at IRM in 2007. It matches the F&C 6800 " Rutland ballast
car" kit which I have.

The Spokane, Portland and Seattle received 150 identical H&B cars built
in 1909 as their first equipment. They used the "Lidgerwood rapid
ballast unloader" to unload the cars. The cars were known among the
employees as "lidgerwood" cars. The Lidgerwood machines were the type
used in the Panama Canal dirt moving operations that Ralph Budd helped
set up. (He was Chief Engineer of SP&S in 1910-11 before going to the
GN.)

In later decades, the cars were used as fodder for construction of stock
cars, flat cars, MOW equipment, and the X26 snow plow that MDC "sort-of
followed" in their snowplow kit of 30 years ago. The last four side
door cars were still on the MOW roster into the early 1950's. The only
differences that I could see between the SP&S cars and the C&WI car at
IRM was that (1) the C&WI car had a drop brake lever at the corner
whereas the SP&S cars had a brake wheel, (2) more modern trucks, and (3)
the C&WI car was fitted with a fixed end whereas the SP&S cars had
removable ends.

Later, the Lidgerwood machines were used for pulling steam locomotives
for driver tire truing without taking the axles out of the frame. In
this task some lasted until the end of steam.

I have drawings and photos (or photocopies) of the H&B ballast cars and
the Lidgerwood machines, if anyone is interested.

Cheers,
David Turner
Keeping the S. P. & S. Rwy. Alive in Santa Rosa, California