Painting Resin Freight Car Kits


Paul Hillman
 

I'm building my first resin STMFC freight car kit, a Funaro & Camerlengo. (I've built & painted resin building kits in the past)

F&C says the car is made from, "Polycarbonate Resin".

F&C says to, "wash with a cleaning agent for urethanes, or household cleaner, IE) 'Shout' "

My question is, for a really fine paint-job with RR water-based paints, what are the groups basic recommendations.

Is a primer recommended.

Thanks, Paul Hillman


Bruce Smith
 

"behillman" <chris_hillman@...> 02/25/10 7:55 PM >>>
I'm building my first resin STMFC freight car kit, a Funaro &
Camerlengo. (I've built & painted resin building kits in the past)

F&C says the car is made from, "Polycarbonate Resin".

F&C says to, "wash with a cleaning agent for urethanes, or household
cleaner, IE) 'Shout' "

My question is, for a really fine paint-job with RR water-based paints,
what are the groups basic recommendations.

Is a primer recommended.

Thanks, Paul Hillman

Paul,

It is always a good idea to wash cars prior to painting to remove finger
prints and dirt. Some companies also use mold release, but many do not.
I usually grit blast my cars, then wash in warm water and DAWN dish
detergent. I try to remove as much water as possible, then air dry,
under cover, to keep dust off and only handle the car subsequently with
nitrile (a substitute for latex) gloves.

As for primer, there technically aren't any available in the model paint
lines (Floquil "Primer" is not really a "primer"). It may be useful to
paint an initial base coat of grey, for example, if you are painting a
light color, like yellow, but otherwise I don't bother.

Also, technically, what you call "water based paints" are not really
that. They are still solvent based, however the solvent, usually
alcohol, is water soluble, allowing thinning and clean up using water.
I use a number of brands of these paints (acrylics) with excellent
results on resin cars. If you have not painted with them before, they
do not behave the same ways as enamels so be forewarned...

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


pierreoliver2003 <pierre.oliver@...>
 

I prewash all my resin kits with Shout. I've always been reluctant to go near a finished model with any cleaning items and it works for me. Mind you I do not use acrylics unless I absolutely have to.(For a particular colour) I find that acrylics can be troublesome with adhering to resin.
If you've had success with resin structures then you should have no problems with freight cars.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@..., "behillman" <chris_hillman@...> wrote:

I'm building my first resin STMFC freight car kit, a Funaro & Camerlengo. (I've built & painted resin building kits in the past)

F&C says the car is made from, "Polycarbonate Resin".

F&C says to, "wash with a cleaning agent for urethanes, or household cleaner, IE) 'Shout' "

My question is, for a really fine paint-job with RR water-based paints, what are the groups basic recommendations.

Is a primer recommended.

Thanks, Paul Hillman


Rob & Bev Manley
 

PAul,
I always wash my sheets of castings with Dawn detergent and a little BArkeepers Friend cleanser before separating and sanding the parts. I use a nail board with different grits equal to 100, 200, 300, 400, 600, 800 that I buy at Walgreens for about $100.00 each. I sand the mating edges to break the glossy back surface and sand (even the tiny ones) parts to remove the flash the X-acto won't get. Walgreens or Home Depot ACC works for me and when fresh is as good as the hobby shop brands.
When assembled I gve the car a bath again with dawn and a toothbrush or a 3/4" wide artist oil painter brush. I don't submerge the car so no water enters the body. let dry or coax some of the water away with a hair dryer being careful to not warp the body. I spray all my models with Poly Scale waterbase with no primer. Most of the boxcar colors don't need a primer to neutralize the plastic and resin parts and cover quite well. Glosscoat with Pledge/Future floor acrylic polish and decal per MIcroscale instructions. Flat finish with Poly Scale Flat or MIcroscale flat.
DONE.

Rob

----- Original Message -----
From: behillman
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, February 25, 2010 7:46 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Painting Resin Freight Car Kits



I'm building my first resin STMFC freight car kit, a Funaro & Camerlengo. (I've built & painted resin building kits in the past)

F&C says the car is made from, "Polycarbonate Resin".

F&C says to, "wash with a cleaning agent for urethanes, or household cleaner, IE) 'Shout' "

My question is, for a really fine paint-job with RR water-based paints, what are the groups basic recommendations.

Is a primer recommended.

Thanks, Paul Hillman


Stokes John
 

Pretty pricey nail file boards, must give a really good finish. :).

John S.

To: STMFC@...
From: robev1630@...
Date: Thu, 25 Feb 2010 23:23:43 -0600
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Painting Resin Freight Car Kits




























PAul,

I always wash my sheets of castings with Dawn detergent and a little BArkeepers Friend cleanser before separating and sanding the parts. I use a nail board with different grits equal to 100, 200, 300, 400, 600, 800 that I buy at Walgreens for about $100.00 each. I sand the mating edges to break the glossy back surface and sand (even the tiny ones) parts to remove the flash the X-acto won't get. Walgreens or Home Depot ACC works for me and when fresh is as good as the hobby shop brands.

When assembled I gve the car a bath again with dawn and a toothbrush or a 3/4" wide artist oil painter brush. I don't submerge the car so no water enters the body. let dry or coax some of the water away with a hair dryer being careful to not warp the body. I spray all my models with Poly Scale waterbase with no primer. Most of the boxcar colors don't need a primer to neutralize the plastic and resin parts and cover quite well. Glosscoat with Pledge/Future floor acrylic polish and decal per MIcroscale instructions. Flat finish with Poly Scale Flat or MIcroscale flat.

DONE.



Rob


Bill Welch
 

I do not use a primer with resin or styrene kits, and use almost exclusively Modelflex or Polyscale paints. My routine for the last 3-4 years is Media Blasting the finished model with Baking Soda before washing w/Dawn or Ivory. Sometimes even after this I brush the model with rubbing alcohol and dry it with the airbrush immediately before spraying it with paint.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., "Rob & Bev Manley" <robev1630@...> wrote:

PAul,
I always wash my sheets of castings with Dawn detergent and a little BArkeepers Friend cleanser before separating and sanding the parts. I use a nail board with different grits equal to 100, 200, 300, 400, 600, 800 that I buy at Walgreens for about $100.00 each. I sand the mating edges to break the glossy back surface and sand (even the tiny ones) parts to remove the flash the X-acto won't get. Walgreens or Home Depot ACC works for me and when fresh is as good as the hobby shop brands.
When assembled I gve the car a bath again with dawn and a toothbrush or a 3/4" wide artist oil painter brush. I don't submerge the car so no water enters the body. let dry or coax some of the water away with a hair dryer being careful to not warp the body. I spray all my models with Poly Scale waterbase with no primer. Most of the boxcar colors don't need a primer to neutralize the plastic and resin parts and cover quite well. Glosscoat with Pledge/Future floor acrylic polish and decal per MIcroscale instructions. Flat finish with Poly Scale Flat or MIcroscale flat.
DONE.

Rob


----- Original Message -----
From: behillman
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, February 25, 2010 7:46 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Painting Resin Freight Car Kits



I'm building my first resin STMFC freight car kit, a Funaro & Camerlengo. (I've built & painted resin building kits in the past)

F&C says the car is made from, "Polycarbonate Resin".

F&C says to, "wash with a cleaning agent for urethanes, or household cleaner, IE) 'Shout' "

My question is, for a really fine paint-job with RR water-based paints, what are the groups basic recommendations.

Is a primer recommended.

Thanks, Paul Hillman





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Andy Sperandeo <asperandeo@...>
 

Hello Paul,

I wash finished resin models in tap water with Ivory liquid dish soap (no lotions or other sources of residue), let them air dry, and airbrush them with Floquil Polly Scale acrylic paint. In general I don't use a primer except for the lighter colors. For orange or yellow reefers, for example, I first apply a coat of Polly Scale Undercoat Light Gray. It's easier to get an even coat of the lighter finish colors over an even gray undercoat.

For examples of my results, see the photos of painted Westerfield Santa Fe boxcars in my February "Model Railroader" article, or the Sunshine Swift reefer in the "Andy S freight cars" album in the photo section of the Yahoo STMFC Web pages.

So long,

Andy

Andy Sperandeo
Executive Editor
Model Railroader magazine
asperandeo@...
262-796-8776, ext. 461
FAX 262-796-1142


Jim King
 

Paul,



First off, F&Cs statement "polycarbonate resin" is an impossibility. PC is
either cast in sheets (a trade name is "Lexan") by melting pellets and
pouring into large, flat molds or injection molded. It's usual form is
pellets, which cannot be melted and injected into rubber molds used for
resin kits. PC is an extremely difficult material to melt and injection
mold and is very abrasive on metal molds. F&C's material is a general
purpose urethane resin with no pigmenting added, hence the nearly pure white
color.



I recommend Pine Sol or Soft Scrub to cut the resin on my castings. Priming
afterward with a fast-drying automotive primer, like Duo Cote (found at Auto
Advantage) gives a nice base for follow on paints but urethane will not
react to a straight shot of lacquer-based paints either (as witnessed by
using the Duo Cote). Straight Scalecoat or Floquil will do fine. Any
acrylic will also work but cleanliness is a MUST to prevent this stuff from
fish-eyeing.



Jim King

Smoky Mountain Model Works, Inc.

<www.smokymountainmodelworks.com>


Paul Hillman
 

Thanks for everyone's advice about painting resin cars for a "perfect" finish.

Pierre Oliver mentioned having a problem with Acrylics adhering to these resins. This was one concern I had about Acrylics (water-soluble) paints and resin materials.

Bruce Smith & Bill Welch mention grit / medium blasting the material. This is to, no doubt, provide "tooth" for the paint to adhere to, which might eliminate the problem Pierre referred to of adherence?

Years ago, I used to prefer Floquil's lacquer ? based paint, but they changed it to an enamel ? base and it had a too long of drying time. Started using Acrylics with decent results, but I understand that Acrylics have been greatly improved/refined these days. (I haven't painted anything for a couple of years or so.) I have Paasche spray guns & grit blasters.

Rob Manley mentioned using finger-nail, sanding-boards. I've used those too, as well as gluing sand-paper to a stick of wood. But, I better start getting them at Walgreens from now on. The store I was getting them from wanted $150.00 each. (MUST have been a typo!)

Paul Hillman

----- Original Message -----
From: lnbill<mailto:fgexbill@...>
To: STMFC@...<mailto:STMFC@...>
Sent: Friday, February 26, 2010 6:10 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Painting Resin Freight Car Kits



I do not use a primer with resin or styrene kits, and use almost exclusively Modelflex or Polyscale paints. My routine for the last 3-4 years is Media Blasting the finished model with Baking Soda before washing w/Dawn or Ivory. Sometimes even after this I brush the model with rubbing alcohol and dry it with the airbrush immediately before spraying it with paint.

Bill Welch


railwayman <stevelucas3@...>
 

Paul--

Following a tip in a Mainline Modeler (Stuart Thayer article?) I clean my STMFC's with Comet and water before painting them. Comet is a mildly abrasive scouring powder that does not have lanolin--which many dish soaps do.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., "Paul Hillman" <chris_hillman@...> wrote:

Thanks for everyone's advice about painting resin cars for a "perfect" finish.

Pierre Oliver mentioned having a problem with Acrylics adhering to these resins. This was one concern I had about Acrylics (water-soluble) paints and resin materials.

Bruce Smith & Bill Welch mention grit / medium blasting the material. This is to, no doubt, provide "tooth" for the paint to adhere to, which might eliminate the problem Pierre referred to of adherence?

Years ago, I used to prefer Floquil's lacquer ? based paint, but they changed it to an enamel ? base and it had a too long of drying time. Started using Acrylics with decent results, but I understand that Acrylics have been greatly improved/refined these days. (I haven't painted anything for a couple of years or so.) I have Paasche spray guns & grit blasters.

Rob Manley mentioned using finger-nail, sanding-boards. I've used those too, as well as gluing sand-paper to a stick of wood. But, I better start getting them at Walgreens from now on. The store I was getting them from wanted $150.00 each. (MUST have been a typo!)

Paul Hillman


Dave Nelson
 

behillman wrote:

F&C says to, "wash with a cleaning agent for urethanes, or household
cleaner, IE) 'Shout' "

My question is, for a really fine paint-job with RR water-based
paints, what are the groups basic recommendations.
------------------------------------
On rare occasion I've had resin kits that were really slimy w/ mold release.
I gave them a quick soak in paint thinner and then washed them in soapy
water.

Dave Nelson


Tim O'Connor
 

Personal preference: I wash the major parts prior to assembly. I don't
want to risk damage to an assembled model. I use dish soap but the Comet
sounds like a good idea to me. If I see a fingerprint (rarely) prior to
painting, I just remove it with an alcohol soaked Q-tip.

Tim O'Connor

At 2/26/2010 11:49 AM Friday, you wrote:
Paul--

Following a tip in a Mainline Modeler (Stuart Thayer article?) I clean my STMFC's with Comet and water before painting them. Comet is a mildly abrasive scouring powder that does not have lanolin--which many dish soaps do.

Steve Lucas.


Garth G. Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Tim and friends,

I wonder of Bon Ami would be even better than Comet. No chemicals (IIRC), just diatomatious earth.

Kind regards,


Garth Groff

Tim O'Connor wrote:

Personal preference: I wash the major parts prior to assembly. I don't
want to risk damage to an assembled model. I use dish soap but the Comet
sounds like a good idea to me. If I see a fingerprint (rarely) prior to
painting, I just remove it with an alcohol soaked Q-tip.

Tim O'Connor


Schuyler Larrabee
 

Over time I've come to read all of a thread before I step in (it). Usually,
anyway. And this time Garth has stolen my thunder. Bon Ami's motto,
"Hasn't scratched yet," illustrated with a small chick, is right on the
mark. But it does remove oil and greasy stuff from many things. It's even
safe to use on glass, which Comet can scratch.



Besides, Bon Ami used to be a shipper on the Lackawanna . . .

SGL

Tim and friends,

I wonder of Bon Ami would be even better than Comet. No chemicals
(IIRC), just diatomatious earth.

Kind regards,

Garth Groff

Tim O'Connor wrote:
Personal preference: I wash the major parts prior to assembly. I don't
want to risk damage to an assembled model. I use dish soap but the Comet
sounds like a good idea to me. If I see a fingerprint (rarely) prior to
painting, I just remove it with an alcohol soaked Q-tip.

Tim O'Connor






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Tim O'Connor
 

Garth

That is good if you only want a mild abrasive, but a surfactant
like a detergent helps to remove the oils without abrasion, while
a pure abrasive w/ water might leave some oil behind. The trick
is to find a 'pure' cleanser without aromatic oils or hand lotion.
Mild abrasion is ok but not essential.

On the other hand, it sounds like Bon Ami might be a good item for
modeling spilled cement on covered hoppers! :-)

Tim O'Connor

At 2/26/2010 03:01 PM Friday, you wrote:
Tim and friends,

I wonder of Bon Ami would be even better than Comet. No chemicals
(IIRC), just diatomatious earth.

Kind regards,


Garth Groff

Tim O'Connor wrote:
Personal preference: I wash the major parts prior to assembly. I don't
want to risk damage to an assembled model. I use dish soap but the Comet
sounds like a good idea to me. If I see a fingerprint (rarely) prior to
painting, I just remove it with an alcohol soaked Q-tip.

Tim O'Connor


Rob & Bev Manley
 

You should see what I charge for a used car.
Rob Manley

----- Original Message -----
From: John Stokes
To: stmfc@...
Sent: Friday, February 26, 2010 12:38 AM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Painting Resin Freight Car Kits




Pretty pricey nail file boards, must give a really good finish. :).

John S.

To: STMFC@...
From: robev1630@...
Date: Thu, 25 Feb 2010 23:23:43 -0600
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Painting Resin Freight Car Kits

PAul,

I always wash my sheets of castings with Dawn detergent and a little BArkeepers Friend cleanser before separating and sanding the parts. I use a nail board with different grits equal to 100, 200, 300, 400, 600, 800 that I buy at Walgreens for about $100.00 each. I sand the mating edges to break the glossy back surface and sand (even the tiny ones) parts to remove the flash the X-acto won't get. Walgreens or Home Depot ACC works for me and when fresh is as good as the hobby shop brands.

When assembled I gve the car a bath again with dawn and a toothbrush or a 3/4" wide artist oil painter brush. I don't submerge the car so no water enters the body. let dry or coax some of the water away with a hair dryer being careful to not warp the body. I spray all my models with Poly Scale waterbase with no primer. Most of the boxcar colors don't need a primer to neutralize the plastic and resin parts and cover quite well. Glosscoat with Pledge/Future floor acrylic polish and decal per MIcroscale instructions. Flat finish with Poly Scale Flat or MIcroscale flat.

DONE.

Rob