UP 34' ~1895 Boxcar 66070


David Allen
 

UP 66070
Posted by: "richtownsend@..." richtownsend@... richtownsend2002
Date: Fri Apr 2, 2010 4:54 pm ((PDT))

What class of car would UP 66070 have been in 1904? Is there a photo of this class of cars on line somewhere? If you are interested it was carrying a 30,000 pound load of bagged plaster from Wild's Plaster Mill in Loveland, Colorado to Eaton, Colorado on September 30, 1904.


Rich: UP 66070 was one of the "improved" 34' box cars. If I may:

Pre-1900 Post-1900 Builder
65000 - 68499 65000 - 68499 Various 1893-98
30800 - 30812 68500 - 68907 in 1897 ORER
37000 - 37406 68930 - 68999 in 1897 ORER Mich-Pen 1893


Dimensions: Interior Exterior
IL IW IH EL EW EH
65000 - 68499 33'5" 8'3" 6'9" 34'0" 9'8" 11'5"
68500 - 68907 33'5" 8'3" 7'0" 34'0" 9'7" 11'0"
68930 - 68999 33'5" 8'3" 7'0" 34'0" 9'7" 11'0"
EH rail to eaves

The series 65000 - 68499 used Winslow roofs (a sheet iron roof, for
water tightness, covered by a wood roof to protect the iron roof from
scuffing. Thus the car is somewhat taller than its interior height or
comparison with its peers would suggest.

These cars differed from earlier 34' cars which did not have Winslow
roofs and the heavier framinf materials and were, thus, a tad shorter
to the eaves. These would be the 45000-46095 and the 55000-57211.

By the way, these are post-1900 numbers; a major renumbering of
boxcars went on in the late 1890s.

The prime reference to these durable wood-framed cars is:
Workman, Ed, "Common Standard Freight Cars - Pt. 1," The
Streamliner, v11n4, 1997.

And it is neat, at least to me, to know what one of these cars were
doing in 1904.

Dave A


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

David Allen wrote:
The series 65000 - 68499 used Winslow roofs (a sheet iron roof, for water tightness, covered by a wood roof to protect the iron roof from scuffing. Thus the car is somewhat taller than its interior height or comparison with its peers would suggest.
The inside metal roof, of which the Winslow was an example, was widespread before the outside metal roof superseded it. Both were structurally wood roofs, and as David says, the inside metal roof had an additional layer of wood atop the metal sheathing. But this was only about an inch thick, so the "somewhat taller" statement strikes me as an exaggeration.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


soolinehistory <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

The inside metal roof, of which the Winslow was an example,
was widespread before the outside metal roof superseded it. Both were
structurally wood roofs, and as David says, the inside metal roof had
an additional layer of wood atop the metal sheathing. But this was
only about an inch thick, so the "somewhat taller" statement strikes
me as an exaggeration.

Yeah, but... There was also an air space, about an inch or so, between the outer sheathing and the metal roof sheet..

The real spotting feature of these roofs is they looked bulkier... Where the double board roof was simply two layers of 1" stock, actually typically 13/16" for a total thickness of 1-5/8", and the outside metal roofs ended on a small fascia just slightly overhanging the car side (or not, the original construction of the USRA double sheathed cars put this fascia flush with the car siding) inside metal roofs had a second fascia spaced out from the first to allow drainage of any water would weep through the board roof. This fascia was the width of the thickness of the inner roof, plus the air space and so was a rather prominent feature along the top of the car side. In those days of wood framing, before the advent of using a Z bar for the top plate, the roof was always the widest part of the car, and an inside metal roof made it wider.

Dennis


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Dennis Storzek wrote:
Yeah, but... There was also an air space, about an inch or so, between the outer sheathing and the metal roof sheet..
The real spotting feature of these roofs is they looked bulkier... Where the double board roof was simply two layers of 1" stock, actually typically 13/16" for a total thickness of 1-5/8", and the outside metal roofs ended on a small fascia just slightly overhanging the car side (or not, the original construction of the USRA double sheathed cars put this fascia flush with the car siding) inside metal roofs had a second fascia spaced out from the first to allow drainage of any water would weep through the board roof.
Dennis is right, though the much later USRA cars may not have had too much in common with the 1890s car we started on. The 1906 "Cyc" (actually the Dictionary) has a nice section showing cross- sections of the various inside metal roofs. Spacers between the two layers appear to add about an inch to total car height. Adding that inch to the 13/16-inch thickness of the outer roof, I will still say that the cars were not MUCH taller than their wooden-roof siblings.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history