(perishables) interchange


Bruce Smith
 

Thomas Baker <bakert@...> 04/04/10 10:27 AM >>>
People have pointed out the the Pennsy was the least preferred forwarder
as far as PFE/SFRD were concerned with the NYC, and B&O not far from the
bottom of the list. Does someone out there know who got most of the
meat and perishablies--if there were any--from the CGW. The list
mentions the ERIE as the road that reliably delivered.

Tom,

I'm not sure about the CGW specifically, but your email hints at a
problem that occurs every time this discussion comes up. Do NOT mistake
the comments about shipper preference and handling issues with
perishables for data on the AMOUNT of perishables traffic. This
couldn't be farther from the truth! Based on the 1950 ICC freight
commodity reports on loads handled, the PRR was the #3 handler of
perishables IN THE COUNTRY, behind SP and UP.

The numbers go like this:
UP 248072 loads
SP 190755
PRR 145712
ATSF 107402 - I know that hurts Richard ;^) but I also know he takes
pride that although ATSF only handled a little over 2/3 of the
perishables that PRR did, they did it better <G>

Next, in quick succession come IC, NYC and CB&Q (77340, 74240, 71759
respectively)

In the next grouping are ACL, Seaboard, finally the vaunted Erie and NKP
(50805, 48795, 45105, 43154 respectively)

So, while the PFE and SFRD management and employees may well have
preferred Erie to PRR and NYC, by far the biggest hauler of perishables
was the PRR. Dems da facts...

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


al_brown03
 

Do the ICC reports (or any other data) split out perishables moving west-to-east from those moving south-to-north? For perishables off the SAL or ACL moving to the northeast, there weren't too many practical routings, the most direct of which were PRR and B&O. From the west, there were more alternatives.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@..., "Bruce Smith" <smithbf@...> wrote:

Thomas Baker <bakert@...> 04/04/10 10:27 AM >>>
People have pointed out the the Pennsy was the least preferred forwarder
as far as PFE/SFRD were concerned with the NYC, and B&O not far from the
bottom of the list. Does someone out there know who got most of the
meat and perishablies--if there were any--from the CGW. The list
mentions the ERIE as the road that reliably delivered.

Tom,

I'm not sure about the CGW specifically, but your email hints at a
problem that occurs every time this discussion comes up. Do NOT mistake
the comments about shipper preference and handling issues with
perishables for data on the AMOUNT of perishables traffic. This
couldn't be farther from the truth! Based on the 1950 ICC freight
commodity reports on loads handled, the PRR was the #3 handler of
perishables IN THE COUNTRY, behind SP and UP.

The numbers go like this:
UP 248072 loads
SP 190755
PRR 145712
ATSF 107402 - I know that hurts Richard ;^) but I also know he takes
pride that although ATSF only handled a little over 2/3 of the
perishables that PRR did, they did it better <G>

Next, in quick succession come IC, NYC and CB&Q (77340, 74240, 71759
respectively)

In the next grouping are ACL, Seaboard, finally the vaunted Erie and NKP
(50805, 48795, 45105, 43154 respectively)

So, while the PFE and SFRD management and employees may well have
preferred Erie to PRR and NYC, by far the biggest hauler of perishables
was the PRR. Dems da facts...

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Bruce Smith
 

Al,

No, just totals are shown.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

"al_brown03" <abrown@...> 04/04/10 3:35 PM >>>
Do the ICC reports (or any other data) split out perishables moving
west-to-east from those moving south-to-north? For perishables off the
SAL or ACL moving to the northeast, there weren't too many practical
routings, the most direct of which were PRR and B&O. From the west,
there were more alternatives.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


--- In STMFC@..., "Bruce Smith" <smithbf@...> wrote:

Thomas Baker <bakert@...> 04/04/10 10:27 AM >>>
People have pointed out the the Pennsy was the least preferred
forwarder
as far as PFE/SFRD were concerned with the NYC, and B&O not far from
the
bottom of the list. Does someone out there know who got most of the
meat and perishablies--if there were any--from the CGW. The list
mentions the ERIE as the road that reliably delivered.

Tom,

I'm not sure about the CGW specifically, but your email hints at a
problem that occurs every time this discussion comes up. Do NOT
mistake
the comments about shipper preference and handling issues with
perishables for data on the AMOUNT of perishables traffic. This
couldn't be farther from the truth! Based on the 1950 ICC freight
commodity reports on loads handled, the PRR was the #3 handler of
perishables IN THE COUNTRY, behind SP and UP.

The numbers go like this:
UP 248072 loads
SP 190755
PRR 145712
ATSF 107402 - I know that hurts Richard ;^) but I also know he takes
pride that although ATSF only handled a little over 2/3 of the
perishables that PRR did, they did it better <G>

Next, in quick succession come IC, NYC and CB&Q (77340, 74240, 71759
respectively)

In the next grouping are ACL, Seaboard, finally the vaunted Erie and
NKP
(50805, 48795, 45105, 43154 respectively)

So, while the PFE and SFRD management and employees may well have
preferred Erie to PRR and NYC, by far the biggest hauler of
perishables
was the PRR. Dems da facts...

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Bruce Smith wrote:
Do NOT mistake the comments about shipper preference and handling issues with perishables for data on the AMOUNT of perishables traffic. This couldn't be farther from the truth! Based on the 1950 ICC freight commodity reports on loads handled, the PRR was the #3 handler of perishables IN THE COUNTRY, behind SP and UP.
Well, PRR handled more of most everything . . . Bruce, do you know how the PRR percentage of total perishable loads would stack up in comparison to their percentage of other load types?

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Greg Martin
 

Tony,

We did perhishabes fruits and vegetables, meat and livestock in TKM. I have yet to publish the lumber data, but I have those numbers as well.

Greg Martin

-----Original Message-----
From: Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sun, Apr 4, 2010 3:30 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] (perishables) interchange




Bruce Smith wrote:
Do NOT mistake the comments about shipper preference and handling
issues with perishables for data on the AMOUNT of perishables
traffic. This couldn't be farther from the truth! Based on the
1950 ICC freight commodity reports on loads handled, the PRR was
the #3 handler of perishables IN THE COUNTRY, behind SP and UP.
Well, PRR handled more of most everything . . . Bruce, do you
know how the PRR percentage of total perishable loads would stack up
in comparison to their percentage of other load types?

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Greg Martin wrote:
We did perhishabes fruits and vegetables, meat and livestock in TKM. I have yet to publish the lumber data, but I have those numbers as well.
Which issue? I don't always read the entire issue, so may have missed it.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Aley, Jeff A
 

Al,

From what I recall, the ICC data shows data either by railroad (i.e. carloads originated by a particular road, or carloads terminated, or bridge carloads [I forget the correct term]. They also have state-to-state data (i.e. carloads originated by a particular state, etc.)

As far as I know, there is no combined data that would show, for example, carloads originating in Georgia on the SAL.

Stanford University has a very nice collection of the ICC Reports. I am under the impression that each state has a U.S. Govt depository library, and they may also have a collection of the reports.

Regards,

-Jeff


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of al_brown03
Sent: Sunday, April 04, 2010 1:33 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: (perishables) interchange



Do the ICC reports (or any other data) split out perishables moving west-to-east from those moving south-to-north? For perishables off the SAL or ACL moving to the northeast, there weren't too many practical routings, the most direct of which were PRR and B&O. From the west, there were more alternatives.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@...<mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>, "Bruce Smith" <smithbf@...> wrote:

Thomas Baker <bakert@...> 04/04/10 10:27 AM >>>
People have pointed out the the Pennsy was the least preferred forwarder
as far as PFE/SFRD were concerned with the NYC, and B&O not far from the
bottom of the list. Does someone out there know who got most of the
meat and perishablies--if there were any--from the CGW. The list
mentions the ERIE as the road that reliably delivered.

Tom,

I'm not sure about the CGW specifically, but your email hints at a
problem that occurs every time this discussion comes up. Do NOT mistake
the comments about shipper preference and handling issues with
perishables for data on the AMOUNT of perishables traffic. This
couldn't be farther from the truth! Based on the 1950 ICC freight
commodity reports on loads handled, the PRR was the #3 handler of
perishables IN THE COUNTRY, behind SP and UP.

The numbers go like this:
UP 248072 loads
SP 190755
PRR 145712
ATSF 107402 - I know that hurts Richard ;^) but I also know he takes
pride that although ATSF only handled a little over 2/3 of the
perishables that PRR did, they did it better <G>

Next, in quick succession come IC, NYC and CB&Q (77340, 74240, 71759
respectively)

In the next grouping are ACL, Seaboard, finally the vaunted Erie and NKP
(50805, 48795, 45105, 43154 respectively)

So, while the PFE and SFRD management and employees may well have
preferred Erie to PRR and NYC, by far the biggest hauler of perishables
was the PRR. Dems da facts...

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Aley, Jeff A wrote:
From what I recall, the ICC data shows data either by railroad (i.e. carloads originated by a particular road, or carloads terminated, or bridge carloads [I forget the correct term]. They also have state-to-state data (i.e. carloads originated by a particular state, etc.)
Jeff, do the data contain ton-miles by freight category? That would be interesting as a way of seeing long-distance vs. for example terminal handling only.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Aley, Jeff A
 

Tony,

I don't THINK ton-miles are included; tonnage and carloads are.

You may try the following searches prior to your visit to Stanford's Green Library:

AUTHOR: Interstate Commerce Commission
TITLE: 1950

I think you might also search for
AUTHOR: Interstate Commerce Commission
TITLE: State to State distribution of carload

And

AUTHOR: Interstate Commerce Commission
TITLE: Carload waybill statistics

The online catalog is located at http://socrates.stanford.edu (use the "Combined Search").

Kudos to Dave Nelson for informing me of this excellent resource.

Regards,

-Jeff


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Anthony Thompson
Sent: Tuesday, April 06, 2010 3:56 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: (perishables) interchange



Aley, Jeff A wrote:
From what I recall, the ICC data shows data either by
railroad (i.e. carloads originated by a particular road, or carloads
terminated, or bridge carloads [I forget the correct term]. They
also have state-to-state data (i.e. carloads originated by a
particular state, etc.)
Jeff, do the data contain ton-miles by freight category? That
would be interesting as a way of seeing long-distance vs. for example
terminal handling only.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...<mailto:thompson%40signaturepress.com>
Publishers of books on railroad history