Perishable Schedules


Bill Welch
 

I have been fortunate to scan several "Perishable Schedules" published by the ACL, SAL, and L&N and anticipate accessing several more including a group published by the Southern soon. I also have one from the Charleston & Western Carolina. Many of these were loaned to me to scan by collector and dealer Kent Hannah plus my friends John King and Jim Singer.

All of these help draw a picture of the way Fruit Growers Express traffic moved from the southeast to the major markets of the northeast and upper midwest, which involved many other railroads in addition to the B&O and PRR (this is not said to diminish the volume of either of these RR's).

A nice example is the relatively simple schedule published by the C&WC for train #97 which originated in Augusta, GA (with reefers originating from the ACL, SAL and FEC) and was handed off to the Clinchfield at Spartanburg, SC to travel behind their Challengers (and later grey & yellow EMD F-5's) to the C&O at Elkhorn City, KY. From here the C&O moved FGE's traffic to:

Buffalo, NY via the NKP
Charleston, VW
Chicago, IL
Cincinnati, OH
Cleveland, OH via the NKP
Detroit, MI via NYC in some cases
Flint, MI
Ft Wayne, IN via the NKP
Fostoria, OH
Grand Rapids, MI
Huntington, WV
Lansing, MI
Saginaw, MI
Toledo, OH
Toronto, ON via CP
Toronto, ON via D&TSL-GT-CN

Another example was part of the schedule from Birmingham, AL for cars delivered by the Seaboard Airline

Lv. B'ham 7 PM Wed. via the I.C. to Ar. Chicago 11 PM Thurs.
Lv. B'ham 7:30 PM Wed. via the SL-SF to Kansas City, Ar. Thurs. 4 AM
Lv. B'ham 4 AM Thurs. via the GM&O to Memphis Ar. 8:30 PM Thurs.

Bill Welch


water.kresse@...
 

Bill,



Notice that the Chinchfield and C&O synchronized their Fast Freight numbers . . . even though one went east-west and the other north-south but both actually going northwest-southeast . . . to get fresh veggies up to Chicago.



Al

----- Original Message -----
From: "Bill Welch " < fgexbill @ tampabay . rr .com>
To: STMFC @ yahoogroups .com
Sent: Monday, April 5, 2010 1:55:02 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: [ STMFC ] Perishable Schedules

I have been fortunate to scan several "Perishable Schedules"  
published by the ACL , SAL, and L&N and anticipate accessing several  
more including a group published by the Southern soon. I also have  
one from the Charleston & Western Carolina. Many of these were loaned  
to me to scan by collector and dealer Kent Hannah plus my friends  
John King and Jim Singer.

All of these help draw a picture of the way Fruit Growers Express  
traffic moved from the southeast to the major markets of the  
northeast and upper midwest , which involved many other railroads in  
addition to the B&O and PRR (this is not said to diminish the volume  
of either of these RR's ).

A nice example is the relatively simple schedule published by the  
C&WC for train #97 which originated in Augusta, GA (with reefers  
originating from the ACL , SAL and FEC ) and was handed off to the  
Clinchfield at Spartanburg , SC to travel behind their Challengers  
(and later grey & yellow EMD F-5's) to the C&O at Elkhorn City, KY.  
 From here the C&O moved FGE's traffic to:

Buffalo, NY via the NKP
Charleston, VW
Chicago, IL
Cincinnati, OH
Cleveland, OH via the NKP
Detroit, MI via NYC in some cases
Flint, MI
Ft Wayne, IN via the NKP
Fostoria , OH
Grand Rapids, MI
Huntington, WV
Lansing, MI
Saginaw, MI
Toledo, OH
Toronto, ON via CP
Toronto, ON via D&TSL-GT-CN

Another example was part of the schedule from Birmingham, AL for cars  
delivered by the Seaboard Airline

Lv . B'ham 7 PM Wed. via the I.C. to Ar. Chicago 11 PM Thurs.
Lv . B'ham 7:30 PM Wed. via the SL-SF to Kansas City, Ar. Thurs. 4 AM
Lv . B'ham 4 AM Thurs. via the GM&O to Memphis Ar. 8:30 PM  Thurs.

Bill Welch


al_brown03
 

Neat stuff! And needless to say, I look forward with fascination to Bill's FGE/WFEX/BREX masterwork.

That said, I used the word "northeast" narrowly, to mean the Boston-Washington corridor and New England. I'd have described the destinations Bill cites as "midwestern", including Buffalo since one got there via NKP. My New Jersey upbringing is many years in the past, but I guess it shows when I least expect it to!

The thread was originally about routings chosen by western shippers of perishables, and it's said they preferred Erie or Nickel Plate to PRR or NYC or B&O. It was countered that PRR handled a lot of perishables. I'm wondering whether PRR's perishable volume means that the preference just mentioned wasn't really all that strong, or does it mean that a lot of perishables came through gateways where there wasn't much choice? To tell, ideally one would want a gateway-by-gateway breakdown of the roads receiving perishable traffic.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@..., Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

I have been fortunate to scan several "Perishable Schedules"
published by the ACL, SAL, and L&N and anticipate accessing several
more including a group published by the Southern soon. I also have
one from the Charleston & Western Carolina. Many of these were loaned
to me to scan by collector and dealer Kent Hannah plus my friends
John King and Jim Singer.

All of these help draw a picture of the way Fruit Growers Express
traffic moved from the southeast to the major markets of the
northeast and upper midwest, which involved many other railroads in
addition to the B&O and PRR (this is not said to diminish the volume
of either of these RR's).

A nice example is the relatively simple schedule published by the
C&WC for train #97 which originated in Augusta, GA (with reefers
originating from the ACL, SAL and FEC) and was handed off to the
Clinchfield at Spartanburg, SC to travel behind their Challengers
(and later grey & yellow EMD F-5's) to the C&O at Elkhorn City, KY.
From here the C&O moved FGE's traffic to:

Buffalo, NY via the NKP
Charleston, VW
Chicago, IL
Cincinnati, OH
Cleveland, OH via the NKP
Detroit, MI via NYC in some cases
Flint, MI
Ft Wayne, IN via the NKP
Fostoria, OH
Grand Rapids, MI
Huntington, WV
Lansing, MI
Saginaw, MI
Toledo, OH
Toronto, ON via CP
Toronto, ON via D&TSL-GT-CN

Another example was part of the schedule from Birmingham, AL for cars
delivered by the Seaboard Airline

Lv. B'ham 7 PM Wed. via the I.C. to Ar. Chicago 11 PM Thurs.
Lv. B'ham 7:30 PM Wed. via the SL-SF to Kansas City, Ar. Thurs. 4 AM
Lv. B'ham 4 AM Thurs. via the GM&O to Memphis Ar. 8:30 PM Thurs.

Bill Welch


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Al Brown wrote:
The thread was originally about routings chosen by western shippers of perishables, and it's said they preferred Erie or Nickel Plate to PRR or NYC or B&O. It was countered that PRR handled a lot of perishables. I'm wondering whether PRR's perishable volume means that the preference just mentioned wasn't really all that strong, or does it mean that a lot of perishables came through gateways where there wasn't much choice?
I understand your confusion, Al, but I think you are mixing up two different things. The fact was that PRR and NYC and B&O served an awful lot of the U.S. population in, say, the 1950s. Note that Bruce Smith mentioned carloads, and of course many, many carloads HAD to travel the "undesirable" roads at the end of the trip. That doesn't mean they traveled those roads any farther than absolutely necessary. It would be interesting to compare carload-miles to total carloads. And of course shippers didn't have to listen to their local PFE agent unless they wanted to; if they didn't mind damage claims (after all, the railroad paid), they could ship as much on the PRR as they liked.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Greg Martin
 

Al Brown writes:

It was countered that PRR handled a lot of perishables. I'm wondering whether PRR's perishable volume means that the preference just mentioned wasn't really all that strong, or does it mean that a lot of perishables came through gateways where there wasn't much choice? To tell, ideally one would want a gateway-by-gateway breakdown of the roads receiving perishable traffic.






The charts that appeared in TKM corresponding to perishable fruit and vegetables clear showed that the PRR handled more carloads of perishables than any other eastern carrier... the keyword is ~carloads handled ~ That accounted for loads generated online, at interchange, as a bridge and as a delivering carrier and as consolidated and then for furtherance and was the case for all the railroads in the study. Randy Williamson did some traffic studies along these lines in terms of revenue generated (based on rates per hundred weight) and share the study with Bruce, Elden and myself and was encouraged to publish his findings as it did break the totals down as I have described them in ICC terms. To date I have not seen the study published. Randy also has a vast collection of PRR perishable routings as well.

Checking the archives for this might be helpful as the late Tim Gilbert had added much to the original discussion regarding tonage totals as well, there in my lie the PRR interhange information for the north~south traffic as we had several emails privately regarding the PRR perishable business.

Greg Martin


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Greg Martin wrote:
The charts that appeared in TKM corresponding to perishable fruit and vegetables clear showed that the PRR handled more carloads of perishables than any other eastern carrier... the keyword is ~carloads handled ~ That accounted for loads generated online, at interchange, as a bridge and as a delivering carrier and as consolidated and then for furtherance and was the case for all the railroads in the study.
Given the size of PRR and the size of its car fleet, I'd guess that PRR handled more carloads of practically everything than anyone else, maybe excepting coal.
I'd still like a mention of which TKM this appeared in.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


SUVCWORR@...
 

Tony,

Issue 27 October 2005 is the TKM.

Rich Orr

-----Original Message-----
From: Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tue, Apr 6, 2010 2:09 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Perishable Schedules


Greg Martin wrote:
The charts that appeared in TKM corresponding to perishable fruit
and vegetables clear showed that the PRR handled more carloads of
perishables than any other eastern carrier... the keyword is
~carloads handled ~ That accounted for loads generated online, at
interchange, as a bridge and as a delivering carrier and as
consolidated and then for furtherance and was the case for all the
railroads in the study.
Given the size of PRR and the size of its car fleet, I'd guess
that PRR handled more carloads of practically everything than anyone
else, maybe excepting coal.
I'd still like a mention of which TKM this appeared in.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history



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