was LCL - Stop Off traffic


Ross McLeod <cdnrailmarine@...>
 

"The railroad term would "stop off to partially unload". Freight rate would
be for the entire weight of the commodity from origin to final destination,
with a stop off charge for each stop off point."

 
Plus out of line haul charges, if applicable.
 
Out of line would be the extra distance the car would have to travel to the stop off point versus being shipped direct to the destination. 
 
Some railroads would waive OLH charges if the out of route mileage did not exceed 1/3 of their haul.
 
I understood it was the high cost of cedar lumber that fueled the demand for partial loads.   
 
Ross McLeod Calgary.  
  

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Steve SANDIFER
 

Stop off cars also handled thing like appliances, farm machinery, etc.
______________
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@sbcglobal.net
Home: 12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX 77025, 713-667-9417

----- Original Message -----
From: Ross McLeod
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, April 14, 2010 8:02 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] was LCL - Stop Off traffic




"The railroad term would "stop off to partially unload". Freight rate would
be for the entire weight of the commodity from origin to final destination,
with a stop off charge for each stop off point."


Plus out of line haul charges, if applicable.

Out of line would be the extra distance the car would have to travel to the stop off point versus being shipped direct to the destination.

Some railroads would waive OLH charges if the out of route mileage did not exceed 1/3 of their haul.

I understood it was the high cost of cedar lumber that fueled the demand for partial loads.

Ross McLeod Calgary.


__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com


Ross McLeod <cdnrailmarine@...>
 

"Stop off cars also handled thing like appliances, farm machinery, etc".
 
Correct, I believe with ag imps you could have up to three stop offs, baler twine as many as you wished. 
 
There was also stop offs to complete loading as well there were many transit arrangements such as treating in transit (poles etc), milling in transit (grain), storage in transit or one of my favourites furfural residue (corn cob hulls ex Memphis made into glue @ Oroville for wood built-up (plywood)).  
 
Ross McLeod Calgary 
 
 
 

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Tim O'Connor
 

Ross

I've heard of storage in transit for grain, but milling in transit??
Wouldn't the transformation of bulk grain into bags of flour involve
an entirely new tariff?

Tim O'Connor

There was also stop offs to complete loading as well there were many transit arrangements such as treating in transit (poles etc), milling in transit (grain), storage in transit or one of my favourites furfural residue (corn cob hulls ex Memphis made into glue @ Oroville for wood built-up (plywood)).

Ross McLeod Calgary


Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Ross

I've heard of storage in transit for grain, but milling in transit??
Wouldn't the transformation of bulk grain into bags of flour involve
an entirely new tariff?

Tim O'Connor
No, it was a single tariff designed to keep the flour traffic on the line that had originated the grain move. It goes back a long way; here's a link to a nespaper article from 1890:

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9802EED8153BE533A25752C1A9629C94619ED7CF

Keep in mind that grain is fungible, like money is. When you go to the bank to make a withdrawal, you don't get the same money you deposited back; you get different but equal money. Grain is the same, you don't get your grain back out of the elevator, you get different but equal grain. Same with milling in transit. You don't get the flour that was milled from the grain you hauled in; you get equal flour milled from different grain. So, the car just emptied of grain can be immediately refilled with flour and sent on its way.

Dennis


Ross McLeod <cdnrailmarine@...>
 

"I've heard of storage in transit for grain, but milling in transit??
Wouldn't the transformation of bulk grain into bags of flour involve
an entirely new tariff?"
 
It would always be that way, once the shipment leaves the transit point, the inbound bill(s) would be surrendered and the freight paid credited to the thru rate for the "new commodity" from the original origin.
 
It could get complicated as you may be dealing with an outbound shipment that comprised product or tonnages from multiple origins into the transit station. I believe I saw some bills from five origins credited on one outbound bill. There were also time limits involved.
 
Ross McLeod Calgary

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com


Tim O'Connor
 

Ah, but Dennis, suppose I shipped a box car of $100 bills to the bank,
and withdrew it again as pennies?

:-) Tim "infungible" O'Connor

I've heard of storage in transit for grain, but milling in transit??
Wouldn't the transformation of bulk grain into bags of flour involve
an entirely new tariff?

Tim O'Connor
No, it was a single tariff designed to keep the flour traffic on the line that had originated the grain move. It goes back a long way; here's a link to a nespaper article from 1890:

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9802EED8153BE533A25752C1A9629C94619ED7CF

Keep in mind that grain is fungible, like money is. When you go to the bank to make a withdrawal, you don't get the same money you deposited back; you get different but equal money. Grain is the same, you don't get your grain back out of the elevator, you get different but equal grain. Same with milling in transit. You don't get the flour that was milled from the grain you hauled in; you get equal flour milled from different grain. So, the car just emptied of grain can be immediately refilled with flour and sent on its way.

Dennis


Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


Ah, but Dennis, suppose I shipped a box car of $100 bills to the bank,
and withdrew it again as pennies?

:-) Tim "infungible" O'Connor
Tim,

Your point?

Dennis


Ross McLeod <cdnrailmarine@...>
 

"Ah, but Dennis, suppose I shipped a box car of $100 bills to the bank,
and withdrew it again as pennies?"
 
Less the charge for transit - transit would be considered a priviledge.
 
Ross McLeod Calgary
 

 

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Paul <buygone@...>
 

Tim:



No problem, if before hand you had negotiated a rate with the railroad
tariff bureau for the shipment of $100.00 dollar bills with a stop privilege
for the conversation to pennies. Your rate with stop privileges would be
published in a tariff and you could have shipped it. Everything that the
railroads hauled was covered by a published tariff rate.



Paul



_____

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tim
O'Connor
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2010 9:11 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: was LCL - Stop Off traffic






Ah, but Dennis, suppose I shipped a box car of $100 bills to the bank,
and withdrew it again as pennies?

:-) Tim "infungible" O'Connor

I've heard of storage in transit for grain, but milling in transit??
Wouldn't the transformation of bulk grain into bags of flour involve
an entirely new tariff?

Tim O'Connor
No, it was a single tariff designed to keep the flour traffic on the line
that had originated the grain move. It goes back a long way; here's a link
to a nespaper article from 1890:

http://query.
<http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9802EED8153BE533A25752C1A962
9C94619ED7CF>
nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9802EED8153BE533A25752C1A9629C94619ED7CF

Keep in mind that grain is fungible, like money is. When you go to the bank
to make a withdrawal, you don't get the same money you deposited back; you
get different but equal money. Grain is the same, you don't get your grain
back out of the elevator, you get different but equal grain. Same with
milling in transit. You don't get the flour that was milled from the grain
you hauled in; you get equal flour milled from different grain. So, the car
just emptied of grain can be immediately refilled with flour and sent on its
way.

Dennis




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

No problem, if before hand you had negotiated a rate with the railroad
tariff bureau for the shipment of $100.00 dollar bills with a stop privilege
for the conversation to pennies. Your rate with stop privileges would be
published in a tariff and you could have shipped it. Everything that the
railroads hauled was covered by a published tariff rate.
Not knowing anything about tariffs I'm going to assume that the cost would have been for paper and copper? :-)
--
Jon Miller