"Tar Paper " and "Mule Hyde" Roofs


reporterllc
 

Assuming that some wood freight cars and cabooses had roofs not unlike that on passenger cars, what techniques and materials are you all using to model that?

Victor Baird
Fort Wayne, Indiana


jerryglow2
 

On some brass cabooses, I stippled on artists acrylics to get a textured surface. Works well for tarred roofs on buildings too, in fact, that's how I started using the technique.

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "wabash2813" <reporterllc@...> wrote:

Assuming that some wood freight cars and cabooses had roofs not unlike that on passenger cars, what techniques and materials are you all using to model that?

Victor Baird
Fort Wayne, Indiana


cinderandeight@...
 

Victor,
Some freight cars did indeed have canvas roofs that were painted
several coats of paint. The June 2, 1928 issue of Railway Age (Page 70) had an
ad for "Mule Hide" roofing which read as follows:
"Why lay up your cars while you wait for several coats of paint to dry
on canvas?
MULE-HIDE canvas car roofing is made of the same raw duck that you are
accustomed to use on the roofs of passenger cars, saturated and coated
both sides with pure Mexican Asphalt, permanently waterproofed.
Your men can lay it as quickly as the canvas alone, and as soon as it
is applied the car is ready for service.
Widths and weight to meet your specifications. Standard on many
railways."
The product was offered by the Lehon Company of Chicago.
Incidentally, the car illustrated in the ad was a CV "Green Mountain Route" milk car,
#567.

Rich Burg


WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Victor;

I came across an "O" scale list that recommended Johnson and Johnson
paper tape (for bandages). I bought some but have not as yet tried it.
Also tissue set into fresh paint or oversprayed with paint.

Bill Pardie
On Apr 15, 2010, at 1:19 AM, jerryglow@comcast.net wrote:

On some brass cabooses, I stippled on artists acrylics to get a
textured surface. Works well for tarred roofs on buildings too, in
fact, that's how I started using the technique.

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "wabash2813" <reporterllc@...> wrote:

Assuming that some wood freight cars and cabooses had roofs not
unlike that on passenger cars, what techniques and materials are you
all using to model that?

Victor Baird
Fort Wayne, Indiana



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