Covered hopper layout fleet was: Re: C&EI IRC covered hopper


Clark Propst
 

I'd like to know what the variety of roadnames on covered hoppers would be on a layout dated to the mid 50s.

I've always been under the impression that these cars were 'generally' in captive service (cement), but there were cars that would go off line carrying fertilizer products, or feed/food products.

So, what percentage of a layout fleet should be covered hoppers and what precentage of the covered hoppers should be home road?

I think it's kind of like meat reefers, the farther away from the packinghouse they got the most likely they were to be with cars with other company logos.

Any thoughts documentation would be welcome.
Clark Propst


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Clark Propst wrote:
I'd like to know what the variety of roadnames on covered hoppers would be on a layout dated to the mid 50s.
I've always been under the impression that these cars were 'generally' in captive service (cement), but there were cars that would go off line carrying fertilizer products, or feed/food products.
So, what percentage of a layout fleet should be covered hoppers and what precentage of the covered hoppers should be home road?
I think your generalization is fine for the earliest part of the 1950s, but the use of covered hoppers both for chemicals and for grain and feed rose sharply during the decade, so I believe 1950 would be VERY different from 1960 for such cars. You said "mid 50s" and although I don't know enough about grain and feed shipping to know whether wheat was moving in CHs by then, certainly rice was doing so, and certainly chemical and fertilizer shipping was rising considerably. But cement would still have dominated the traffic, and as you say, that's relatively local. Cement is produced all over the country, and long-distance shipping of it rarely pays.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Rob & Bev Manley
 

CLark,
The CB&Q moved silica sand from areas like Streator, IL, Ottawa, IL, Wedron, IL and Wyoming IL to name a few. Thier ACF covered hoppers had routing info that would direct thier return tothose cities. Decals for the routing info can be bought from Jerry Hamsmith. He uses Rail Graphics for printing and they work great.
HM Decals
1010 Johnston Dr.
Aurora, IL 60506
SCALE: HO
RAILROAD: CB&Q boxcars, hoppers, MoW,and L&M hopper
INFO: LSASE


I'll see what else I can dig up.

Rob Manley

----- Original Message -----
From: rockroll50401
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2010 9:06 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Covered hopper layout fleet was: Re: C&EI IRC covered hopper




I'd like to know what the variety of roadnames on covered hoppers would be on a layout dated to the mid 50s.

I've always been under the impression that these cars were 'generally' in captive service (cement), but there were cars that would go off line carrying fertilizer products, or feed/food products.

So, what percentage of a layout fleet should be covered hoppers and what precentage of the covered hoppers should be home road?

I think it's kind of like meat reefers, the farther away from the packinghouse they got the most likely they were to be with cars with other company logos.

Any thoughts documentation would be welcome.
Clark Propst


Clark Propst
 

"but the use of covered hoppers both for chemicals and for grain
and feed rose sharply during the decade, so I believe 1950 would be
VERY different from 1960 for such cars." Tony Thompson

Yes, there was a transition through every decade.
Clark Propst


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Clark Propst wrote:
Yes, there was a transition through every decade.
Of course, Clark. But I think it was very extensive for covered hoppers during the 1950s, as I stated.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history