Cinders


Clark Propst
 

We were talking the other day about power plants at medium sized industries. Asking ourselves, but not knowing the answers to the questions; How many car loads of coal would the average boiler power generating system use? And what's the percentage ratio of coal to clinker or cinders?

In other words how many 50, 55 ton car loads of coal to gondolas of cinders?

Thanks for any advice
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Tim O'Connor
 

Clark, you can Google for "ash content of coal" -- I found a page
that says typical bituminous ash content is 3.3% to 11.7% by weight.

Tim O'Connor

At 5/16/2010 09:55 AM Sunday, you wrote:
We were talking the other day about power plants at medium sized industries. Asking ourselves, but not knowing the answers to the questions; How many car loads of coal would the average boiler power generating system use? And what's the percentage ratio of coal to clinker or cinders?

In other words how many 50, 55 ton car loads of coal to gondolas of cinders?

Thanks for any advice
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

Well, the next obvious question is "Do cinder cars weigh-out or cube-out?" The desnity I've found for cinders is 112 lbs/ cu ft. (A quick search result, and questionable.) A USRA type 55 ton hopper had a capacity of 1880 cu ft, which would be 105 tons of cinders, so weight governs. It seems reasonable then that 100 hoppers of coal would produce three to twelve hoppers of cinders.

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Tim O'Connor

Clark, you can Google for "ash content of coal" -- I found a page
that says typical bituminous ash content is 3.3% to 11.7% by weight.


water.kresse@...
 

Guys,



That is a lot of cinders: one out of every roughly 10 to 30 cars of coal.  Who was takeing all that cinder "waste"?  They used mine and blast furnace slag "waste" crushed for roadbeds.



Al Kresse

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tim O'Connor" <timboconnor@comcast.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, May 16, 2010 10:40:36 AM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Cinders


Clark, you can Google for "ash content of coal" -- I found a page
that says typical bituminous ash content is 3.3% to 11.7% by weight.

Tim O'Connor


At 5/16/2010 09:55 AM Sunday, you wrote:
We were talking the other day about power plants at medium sized industries. Asking ourselves, but not knowing the answers to the questions; How many car loads of coal would the average boiler power generating system use? And what's the percentage ratio of coal to clinker or cinders?

In other words how many 50, 55 ton car loads of coal to gondolas of cinders?

Thanks for any advice
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


tbarney2004
 

water.kresse@comcast.net wrote:
Guys,


That is a lot of cinders: one out of every roughly 10 to 30 cars of coal. Who was takeing all that cinder "waste"? They used mine and blast furnace slag "waste" crushed for roadbeds.


Al Kresse

In the North/Northeast, I'm sure a good portion of it was used for traction control on roads in the wintertime. I know my grandfather kept a bucketful of ash (wood) from his pot-belly stove in the garage for spreading on the driveway in winter. Don't know percentages though.

Tim Barney


Mike Fortney
 

And then, a quick anecdote as told by the last surviving electric-era motorman on the Illinois Terminal. As a newly hired brakeman during WWII, he was charged with keeping the coal bin in his caboose (conductors rode up front on IT freights) stocked with product from a local mine. He claims that "burning one scoop of Capital Mine coal in the stove produced three or four scoops of ash", so he'd search the yard for a hopper of "that good, clean-burning Kentucky coal" to borrow from instead.

Being an interurban electric freight hauler, the IT had about a dozen local and regional power plants on their system. In its formative years, the IT maintained a fleet of dedicated center- and side-dump gons (some all-steel for "hot" loads) for extensive use of the cinders as fill and ballast for yards, sidings, and branch lines.

Mike Fortney