Weathered reweigh dates, was: Re: Re: IC 40' box car decal


Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Brian Carlson says:


How so the reweigh sets contain the shop date and the separate date allow
one to pick whatever date they want? The are not as bright as I'd like but
weathering helps that.
I have noticed a rather strange phenomenon apparently associated with cars traveling over Sherman Hill and possibly other areas in southern Wyoming. The reweigh dates seem to get covered with dirt...sand...whatever. No idea why this would be so common in that area...

Mike Brock


Brian Carlson
 

Mike: You need to get one of those History channel or Discovery Channel
shows that investigate UFO's and other strange phenomena. Maybe you have
some strange energy vortex down there, it might also explain those N&W
hoppers.



Brian J. Carlson, P.E.

Cheektowaga NY

prrk41361@...



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Mike
Brock
Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2010 11:11 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Weathered reweigh dates, was: Re: [STMFC] Re: IC 40' box car decal






Brian Carlson says:

How so the reweigh sets contain the shop date and the separate date allow
one to pick whatever date they want? The are not as bright as I'd like but
weathering helps that.
I have noticed a rather strange phenomenon apparently associated with cars
traveling over Sherman Hill and possibly other areas in southern Wyoming.
The reweigh dates seem to get covered with dirt...sand...whatever. No idea
why this would be so common in that area...


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Mike Brock wrote:
I have noticed a rather strange phenomenon apparently associated with cars traveling over Sherman Hill and possibly other areas in southern Wyoming. The reweigh dates seem to get covered with dirt...sand...whatever. No idea why this would be so common in that area...
A perfect opportunity for an easy summer project, Mike. Overpaint those pesky dirty reweigh areas and fix 'em with Champ or Sunshine decals. Easy to do, looks great, AND it's actually correct! <running for cover>

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Brian Carlson notes:


Mike: You need to get one of those History channel or Discovery Channel
shows that investigate UFO's and other strange phenomena. Maybe you have
some strange energy vortex down there, it might also explain those N&W
hoppers.
The funny part of this is that it was true...although the dirt/sand covered the entire bottom of the side...for awhile. I noticed in some steam era videos that the ballast was very dark...almost black. Long time steam era photographer and author, Ross Grenard, told me that UP poured oil on the ballast to keep the dirt/sand from blowing. Now, at first glance, one has to wonder...wouldn't that be a fire hazard? I mean, UP steam engines were continually setting fires in the prairie grass beside the tracks. Of course, that area did experience a great deal of wind blown sand erosion. I experienced it on more than one occasion...extremely fine sand particles blown by 40 mph winds entered and shut down my video camera on one trip.

Mike Brock


jerryglow2
 

That all being said, you'd think the repack data was the freshest painted item on the car....

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@..., "Mike Brock" <brockm@...> wrote:

Brian Carlson notes:


Mike: You need to get one of those History channel or Discovery Channel
shows that investigate UFO's and other strange phenomena. Maybe you have
some strange energy vortex down there, it might also explain those N&W
hoppers.
The funny part of this is that it was true...although the dirt/sand covered
the entire bottom of the side...for awhile. I noticed in some steam era
videos that the ballast was very dark...almost black. Long time steam era
photographer and author, Ross Grenard, told me that UP poured oil on the
ballast to keep the dirt/sand from blowing. Now, at first glance, one has to
wonder...wouldn't that be a fire hazard? I mean, UP steam engines were
continually setting fires in the prairie grass beside the tracks. Of course,
that area did experience a great deal of wind blown sand erosion. I
experienced it on more than one occasion...extremely fine sand particles
blown by 40 mph winds entered and shut down my video camera on one trip.

Mike Brock


robert.allan32 <baallan@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Mike Brock" <brockm@...> wrote:

Brian Carlson notes:


Mike: You need to get one of those History channel or Discovery Channel
shows that investigate UFO's and other strange phenomena. Maybe you have
some strange energy vortex down there, it might also explain those N&W
hoppers.
The funny part of this is that it was true...although the dirt/sand covered
the entire bottom of the side...for awhile. I noticed in some steam era
videos that the ballast was very dark...almost black. Long time steam era
photographer and author, Ross Grenard, told me that UP poured oil on the
ballast to keep the dirt/sand from blowing. Now, at first glance, one has to
wonder...wouldn't that be a fire hazard? I mean, UP steam engines were
continually setting fires in the prairie grass beside the tracks. Of course,
that area did experience a great deal of wind blown sand erosion. I
experienced it on more than one occasion...extremely fine sand particles
blown by 40 mph winds entered and shut down my video camera on one trip.

Mike Brock
Friction bearings required lots of oil. I can remember early in my career barrels of journal oil being distributed across the yard, with car inspectors dispatched to insure each journal was filled before dispatch. I am sure this contributed to the appearance of track (and trucks) in that era.

In addition, track angle bars and bolts were lubricated regularly to insure the track structure could expand/contract with the temperature. Lubrication and a hammer were the 1st solution to most problems many car- and track-men encountered! Today, environmental standards prohibit many of these solutions.


soolinehistory <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Mike Brock" <brockm@...> wrote:
...Ross Grenard, told me that UP poured oil on the
ballast to keep the dirt/sand from blowing. Now, at first glance, one has to
wonder...wouldn't that be a fire hazard? ...
Oil was routinely sprayed on track during the steam era to kill vegetation, which in itself was a greater fire hazard than the small amount of oil.

Dennis


Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Dennis Storzek writes:

"Oil was routinely sprayed on track during the steam era to kill vegetation, which in itself was a greater fire hazard than the small amount of oil."

Perhaps so. And, I have personally observed 3985 setting fires near SLC and photos exist of similar fires in Wyoming during steam days. However, such fires were more of an annoyance than anything...given the lack of significant vegatation. Moreover, the only location on the UP in the '50's that I have found black colored ballast is on Sherman Hill. See the video Steam Over Sherman. The ballast used by UP came from ballast mines near Granite and Buford and it was a reddish brown color...not unlike the general appearance of the landcape. Vegetation did, obviously, grow in the region but not to the extent that one might find in other areas. I might add that UP was very sensitive to passenger satisfaction during the period. For a very short period of time UP placed helpers on the rear of streamliners west of Cheyenne. Passengers apparently complained so UP moved them up to front again.

Mike Brock


Bruce Smith
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Mike Brock" <brockm@...> wrote:
...Ross Grenard, told me that UP poured oil on the
ballast to keep the dirt/sand from blowing. Now, at first glance, one
has to
wonder...wouldn't that be a fire hazard? ...
Dennis replied:
Oil was routinely sprayed on track during the steam era to kill
vegetation, which in itself was a greater fire hazard than the small
amount of oil.

Dennis, folks,

Oil was also sprayed on the rails to reduce corrosion from the salt
brine dripping from passing ice reefers. Oil spray cars vanished at the
same time as ice reefers on many railroads.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn AL.


rwitt_2000
 

Bruce Smith wrote:

Dennis, folks,

Oil was also sprayed on the rails to reduce corrosion from the salt
brine dripping from passing ice reefers. Oil spray cars vanished at
the
same time as ice reefers on many railroads.
Bruce,

I don't believe I have ever seen an "oil spray car".

Weed sprayers, but not oil sprayers; does any one have a photo to share?

Regards,

Bob Witt


Bruce Smith
 

I said:
Oil was also sprayed on the rails to reduce corrosion from the salt
brine dripping from passing ice reefers. Oil spray cars vanished at
the
same time as ice reefers on many railroads.

Bob Witt replied:
I don't believe I have ever seen an "oil spray car".
Weed sprayers, but not oil sprayers; does any one have a photo to
share?

Bob,

PRR #497700, page 422, Pennsy Power 3. The caption notes that the PRR
"was one of the few railroads that did it [spay oil] mechanically."

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


tbarney2004
 

Bruce Smith wrote:
I said:

Oil was also sprayed on the rails to reduce corrosion from the salt
brine dripping from passing ice reefers. Oil spray cars vanished at
the

same time as ice reefers on many railroads.

Bob Witt replied:

I don't believe I have ever seen an "oil spray car".

Weed sprayers, but not oil sprayers; does any one have a photo to
share?

Bob,

PRR #497700, page 422, Pennsy Power 3. The caption notes that the PRR
"was one of the few railroads that did it [spay oil] mechanically."

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

Explains why when they undercut the mainline through Altoona a while back for double-stacks, the soil was not permitted to be removed from Conrail property. It was classified as hazardous waste (likely from all the Steam Era oil sprayed along the tracks - had to get STMFC era in here somehow) and was trucked to another site within Conrail property for disposal (it would have had to go to a H.W. dump for processing otherwise). I can't imagine all the weed-control oil and leaking lube oil that must have dripped between the rails in the 150+ years that line has been open. That dirt came out jet black from under the tracks!

Tim Barney


Frederick Freitas <prrinvt@...>
 

GUYZ,

           The Boston & Albany did this on the commuter line to riverside.
Basically a box on a flat, and a motor and spray arms. What they put
on the row was thick, black, and nasty smelling. I watched in awe as
grown ups made a huge mess of everything. Then again, thery were still under steam, too.

Fred Freitas




________________________________
From: Timothy Barney <tbarney@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Mon, May 31, 2010 8:35:27 PM
Subject: Re: Weathered reweigh dates, was: Re: [STMFC] Re: IC 40' box car decal

 
Bruce Smith wrote:
I said:

Oil was also sprayed on the rails to reduce corrosion from the salt
brine dripping from passing ice reefers. Oil spray cars vanished at
the

same time as ice reefers on many railroads.

Bob Witt replied:

I don't believe I have ever seen an "oil spray car".

Weed sprayers, but not oil sprayers; does any one have a photo to
share?

Bob,

PRR #497700, page 422, Pennsy Power 3. The caption notes that the PRR
"was one of the few railroads that did it [spay oil] mechanically."

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

Explains why when they undercut the mainline through Altoona a while
back for double-stacks, the soil was not permitted to be removed from
Conrail property. It was classified as hazardous waste (likely from all
the Steam Era oil sprayed along the tracks - had to get STMFC era in
here somehow) and was trucked to another site within Conrail property
for disposal (it would have had to go to a H.W. dump for processing
otherwise). I can't imagine all the weed-control oil and leaking lube
oil that must have dripped between the rails in the 150+ years that line
has been open. That dirt came out jet black from under the tracks!

Tim Barney



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


MOFWCABOOSE@...
 

O. F. Jordan Company made a self-propelled oil spray car that was used by several railroads, notably the Illinois Central. It looked like a large enclosed speeder and towed one or two tank trailers containing an asphaltic oil. Automatic feelers turned the sprayers on and off when a joint was felt.

Southern Railway had several full-sized flatcars equipped to spray oil. They were stored at Charlotte, NC, after the old refrigerator cars went out of use.

National Aluminate (NALCO) had at least six spray cars that sprayed a special protective chemical called "Nalcote" on rails and joints. Only a few railroads opted for this treatment. One drawback was that the section gangs had to carry small quantities of the stuff to repair the coating at any place where it was disturbed in the course of their maintenance work.




John C. La Rue. Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL

-----Original Message-----
From: Bruce Smith <smithbf@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Mon, May 31, 2010 5:46 pm
Subject: Re: Weathered reweigh dates, was: Re: [STMFC] Re: IC 40' box car decal





I said:
Oil was also sprayed on the rails to reduce corrosion from the salt
brine dripping from passing ice reefers. Oil spray cars vanished at
the
same time as ice reefers on many railroads.
Bob Witt replied:
I don't believe I have ever seen an "oil spray car".
Weed sprayers, but not oil sprayers; does any one have a photo to
share?

Bob,

PRR #497700, page 422, Pennsy Power 3. The caption notes that the PRR
"was one of the few railroads that did it [spay oil] mechanically."

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Ted Schnepf
 


Dennis, folks,

Oil was also sprayed on the rails to reduce corrosion from the salt
brine dripping from passing ice reefers. Oil spray cars vanished at the
same time as ice reefers on many railroads.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Hi Bruce and list,

In may railroad experience the coating on rails to prevent brine corrosion was a asphalt/tar like substance, about 1/16" thick that dried to a grey colored, hard coating. I dealt with many a rail coated with that product in the 1940'sand 1950's. It was only the east bound track on a double track railroad.

Ted


Rails Unlimited
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