HOBBY BLACK


Charles Hladik
 

Robert,
Bill may have been using A-West's "Blacken it". For what ever reason,
it does not always give complete "coverage".
Chuck Hladik

In a message dated 6/16/2010 3:15:42 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
rfederle@cox.net writes:




I used Hobby Black many years ago and dont recall any chipping or flaking.
I worked in a factory that used a similar chemical coloring process
referred to as "Black Oxide" finish. This chemically etches the the surfaces and
adheres to the metal. I am wondering if the chipping you refer too may
actually be a spot where the metal surfacre may not have been 100% clean and
the process didn't make the bond.

Other than that I dont have much else to offer. The oxidation should adere
and bond with the metal and its not like a paint coating.

Robert Federle

---- WILLIAM PARDIE <_PARDIEW001@HAWAII.RR.COM_
(mailto:PARDIEW001@HAWAII.RR.COM) > wrote:


Many modelers have recommended using a chemical blackener on hand
grabs prior to installing and painting.
Therefore you would not have a bright spot later should some of the
paint chip off. I just tried this product on
some brass number board frames. The product claims that it does not
chip or rub off. Not true in my case. I cleaned
down to bare brass and tries again with the same result. I recall
when this product first came out they claimed
that engines were being "painted" with this. Has anyone had any
experience?

Thanks in advance:

Bill Pardie


WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Many modelers have recommended using a chemical blackener on hand grabs prior to installing and painting.
Therefore you would not have a bright spot later should some of the paint chip off. I just tried this product on
some brass number board frames. The product claims that it does not chip or rub off. Not true in my case. I cleaned
down to bare brass and tries again with the same result. I recall when this product first came out they claimed
that engines were being "painted" with this. Has anyone had any experience?

Thanks in advance:

Bill Pardie


rfederle@...
 

I used Hobby Black many years ago and dont recall any chipping or flaking. I worked in a factory that used a similar chemical coloring process referred to as "Black Oxide" finish. This chemically etches the the surfaces and adheres to the metal. I am wondering if the chipping you refer too may actually be a spot where the metal surfacre may not have been 100% clean and the process didn't make the bond.

Other than that I dont have much else to offer. The oxidation should adere and bond with the metal and its not like a paint coating.

Robert Federle

---- WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@HAWAII.RR.COM> wrote:



Many modelers have recommended using a chemical blackener on hand
grabs prior to installing and painting.
Therefore you would not have a bright spot later should some of the
paint chip off. I just tried this product on
some brass number board frames. The product claims that it does not
chip or rub off. Not true in my case. I cleaned
down to bare brass and tries again with the same result. I recall
when this product first came out they claimed
that engines were being "painted" with this. Has anyone had any
experience?

Thanks in advance:

Bill Pardie


Tim O'Connor
 

Hobby Black's active ingredient is the poison selinium dioxide.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selenium_dioxide

You might be able to find it, or similar chemicals, at a gun shop.

Tim O'Connor

At 6/16/2010 03:15 PM Wednesday, you wrote:
I used Hobby Black many years ago and dont recall any chipping or flaking. I worked in a factory that used a similar chemical coloring process referred to as "Black Oxide" finish. This chemically etches the the surfaces and adheres to the metal. I am wondering if the chipping you refer too may actually be a spot where the metal surfacre may not have been 100% clean and the process didn't make the bond.

Other than that I dont have much else to offer. The oxidation should adere and bond with the metal and its not like a paint coating.

Robert Federle


Ned Carey <nedspam@...>
 

The product claims that it does not
chip or rub off. Not true in my case.

That has been my experience also. It seemed to easily rub or chip off. Although I regularly hear of others using it, presumably succesfully, I never followed up to figure what might be the problem.

Ned Carey


Rich C
 

I remember way back when, we used Nickel Chloride as a blackener.
 
Rich Christie

--- On Wed, 6/16/10, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net> wrote:


From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: HOBBY BLACK
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, June 16, 2010, 3:00 PM


 



Hobby Black's active ingredient is the poison selinium dioxide.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selenium_dioxide

You might be able to find it, or similar chemicals, at a gun shop.

Tim O'Connor

At 6/16/2010 03:15 PM Wednesday, you wrote:
I used Hobby Black many years ago and dont recall any chipping or flaking. I worked in a factory that used a similar chemical coloring process referred to as "Black Oxide" finish. This chemically etches the the surfaces and adheres to the metal. I am wondering if the chipping you refer too may actually be a spot where the metal surfacre may not have been 100% clean and the process didn't make the bond.

Other than that I dont have much else to offer. The oxidation should adere and bond with the metal and its not like a paint coating.

Robert Federle


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jun 16, 2010, at 2:56 PM, Ned Carey wrote:

The product claims that it does not
chip or rub off. Not true in my case.

That has been my experience also. It seemed to easily rub or chip
off. Although I regularly hear of others using it, presumably
succesfully, I never followed up to figure what might be the problem.
Though the oxide coating deposited by chemical blackeners is very
thin and will rub off, leaving shiny spots, it is much less likely to
do so if coated with a clear flat finish. However, this discussion
hasn't addressed what I consider to be the most important property of
chemical blackeners, which is that they etch and dull the metal, thus
providing an excellent surface for the adhesion of paint. I
routinely toss metal grab irons, sill steps, hand brake staffs, etc.
into chemical blackener for a minute or so, rinse and dry them, and
then paint them either before or after installation, whichever seems
easier. After being etched in this fashion, they require only a thin
coat of paint and the paint adheres much better than to shiny bare
metal.


Richard Hendrickson


npin53
 

Bleach blackens brass/copper/silver in this way too.

Aaron


Bill Welch
 

I like using white vinegar to etch brass parts prior to painting.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Aaron Gjermundson" <npin53@...> wrote:

Bleach blackens brass/copper/silver in this way too.

Aaron


chapbob@...
 

And some of us may recall the days in the 40s/early-50s when MR
promoted the use of "stove polish"....

Bob Chapman