Topics

Wabash 50' #19000-19124 Autocar #19000-19124

Paul Lyons
 

I am finishing one of the Sunshine "Mini" kits. It is one where a Proto 2000 double door boxcar is converted to a Wabash auto car in the #19000-19124 series. The photo that is part of the instructions is not very clear, therefore, I need a little help to finish it accurately. Can someone tell what trucks were used on the prototype? Also, the instructions says the prototype used a wood running board, but in the photo the running board looks awful "thin" like it might be steel. Can someone confirm the running board on the prototype was wood?

Any and all help is appreciated.
Thanks.
Paul Lyons

Tim O'Connor
 

Paul

The Wabash Freight Car Equipment listing of 12/1964 lists many
specs for 19000-19124 but has no column at all for running boards.
But since the cars were built in 1942, wood running boards were
still legal for new car construction at that time.

For the trucks it only says "Bettendorf Self Aligning". I can safely
say they are NOT ASF A-3 or Barber S-2 since the listings show those
under many other cars. So pick a pre-war "Bettendorf" and you'll be
close.

Interestingly the listings show VULCAN trucks used on several groups
of box cars in 1964, including some built in 1960. Wabash sometimes
recycled old trucks on new freight cars.

Tim O'Connor

I am finishing one of the Sunshine "Mini" kits. It is one where a Proto 2000 double door boxcar is converted to a Wabash auto car in the #19000-19124 series. The photo that is part of the instructions is not very clear, therefore, I need a little help to finish it accurately. Can someone tell what trucks were used on the prototype? Also, the instructions says the prototype used a wood running board, but in the photo the running board looks awful "thin" like it might be steel. Can someone confirm the running board on the prototype was wood?

Any and all help is appreciated.
Thanks.
Paul Lyons

mopacfirst
 

I also am 'working on one'. The doors actually went onto a MoPac car that I did, but the under-door bracing is still going to go onto a Wabash car. Chet French graciously sent me a couple extra photos, from which I concluded that the roofwalk is very likely wood based on how the latitudinal running boards are attached. I also concluded that the trucks are one of those with the two outer springs pretty far apart, such as the Accurail 'Bettendorf' truck.

You may not care about this, but it appears that the lower numbered cars in this block had Youngstown doors. The break was reported to be around 19050, but no evidence shows the exact point. There was also a group of end-door cars, 18000-18024, which appears to have Youngstown doors.

I screwed up the first time, trying to mount the reinforcement under the edge of the sill. Actually, it's supposed to mount behind the sill, and the vertical portions of the end on the resin piece go behind the plastic. Mine are still salvageable, but I'm waiting now until I feel like stripping another Life-Like car. You may need to file a bit of clearance between the resin parts and the underframe, but the fit is so sloppy on the Life-Like car it may not be necessary.

Ron Merrick

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Paul

The Wabash Freight Car Equipment listing of 12/1964 lists many
specs for 19000-19124 but has no column at all for running boards.
But since the cars were built in 1942, wood running boards were
still legal for new car construction at that time.

For the trucks it only says "Bettendorf Self Aligning". I can safely
say they are NOT ASF A-3 or Barber S-2 since the listings show those
under many other cars. So pick a pre-war "Bettendorf" and you'll be
close.

Interestingly the listings show VULCAN trucks used on several groups
of box cars in 1964, including some built in 1960. Wabash sometimes
recycled old trucks on new freight cars.

Tim O'Connor


I am finishing one of the Sunshine "Mini" kits. It is one where a Proto 2000 double door boxcar is converted to a Wabash auto car in the #19000-19124 series. The photo that is part of the instructions is not very clear, therefore, I need a little help to finish it accurately. Can someone tell what trucks were used on the prototype? Also, the instructions says the prototype used a wood running board, but in the photo the running board looks awful "thin" like it might be steel. Can someone confirm the running board on the prototype was wood?

Any and all help is appreciated.
Thanks.
Paul Lyons

Rob Adams
 

Paul/Tim/Ron;

The Wabash 19000-19124 series were built with wood running boards, as
was the very similar 18000-18024 series with end doors. The 18000-18024
cars did indeed have Youngstown doors. Both series of cars had the
frequent Wabash preference of Miner power hand brakes with D3384
malleable iron hand wheel. (The Kadee, DA or similar Miner hand brake
parts will work)

For trucks, use an AAR spring plankless truck (NOT the Accurail, which
has spring planks). I'd suggest the Proto 2000 AAR truck as a good option.

Ron's warning about the side sill reinforcements is an excellent one.
The instructions with the mini-kit aren't particularly clear, and the
photo with it suffers from reproduction problems which renders it of
marginal use. The reinforcement panel meets the car body where the
angle ends transition to a vertical edge.

An article about constructing a WAB 19000-19124 series model using the
Sunshine mini-kit will appear in the next issue (Number 3) of /The
Wabash Modeler/ (TWM), available through membership in the Wabash
Railroad Historical Society. TWM Number 3 will also have an article
about the Wabash 50' express refrigerator cars. This will include
techniques for modifying the Walthers or BLI models to more accurately
represent the Wabash 950-974 series. A discussion of modeling options
in O and N scales will accompany the article.

Freight car fans may also be interested in TWM Number 1, which contains
an article about the Wabash 1958 cu ft covered hoppers (Think
Intermountain's model in HO). The article contained several builders
and in service photos, along with modeling discussion in multiple scales.

Regards, Rob Adams

On 6/28/10 5:26 PM, mopacfirst wrote:

I also am 'working on one'. The doors actually went onto a MoPac car
that I did, but the under-door bracing is still going to go onto a
Wabash car. Chet French graciously sent me a couple extra photos, from
which I concluded that the roofwalk is very likely wood based on how
the latitudinal running boards are attached. I also concluded that the
trucks are one of those with the two outer springs pretty far apart,
such as the Accurail 'Bettendorf' truck.

You may not care about this, but it appears that the lower numbered
cars in this block had Youngstown doors. The break was reported to be
around 19050, but no evidence shows the exact point. There was also a
group of end-door cars, 18000-18024, which appears to have Youngstown
doors.

I screwed up the first time, trying to mount the reinforcement under
the edge of the sill. Actually, it's supposed to mount behind the
sill, and the vertical portions of the end on the resin piece go
behind the plastic. Mine are still salvageable, but I'm waiting now
until I feel like stripping another Life-Like car. You may need to
file a bit of clearance between the resin parts and the underframe,
but the fit is so sloppy on the Life-Like car it may not be necessary.

Ron Merrick

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>, Tim
O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Paul

The Wabash Freight Car Equipment listing of 12/1964 lists many
specs for 19000-19124 but has no column at all for running boards.
But since the cars were built in 1942, wood running boards were
still legal for new car construction at that time.

For the trucks it only says "Bettendorf Self Aligning". I can safely
say they are NOT ASF A-3 or Barber S-2 since the listings show those
under many other cars. So pick a pre-war "Bettendorf" and you'll be
close.

Interestingly the listings show VULCAN trucks used on several groups
of box cars in 1964, including some built in 1960. Wabash sometimes
recycled old trucks on new freight cars.

Tim O'Connor


I am finishing one of the Sunshine "Mini" kits. It is one where a
Proto 2000 double door boxcar is converted to a Wabash auto car in the
#19000-19124 series. The photo that is part of the instructions is not
very clear, therefore, I need a little help to finish it accurately.
Can someone tell what trucks were used on the prototype? Also, the
instructions says the prototype used a wood running board, but in the
photo the running board looks awful "thin" like it might be steel. Can
someone confirm the running board on the prototype was wood?

Any and all help is appreciated.
Thanks.
Paul Lyons

Paul Lyons
 

Thanks Rob,

I figured out the door reinforcement piece the second time around! (G) The bigger problem I had was that the resin Superior doors did not fit between the the Proto 2000 shell door tracks. I was basically going to have to ruin the door looks by filing them down to fit. So I just cut off the entire side sill and scratch built a new one with the bottom door track "lowered" slightly as in the photo. About then is when I realized how the door reinforcement piece attached. What are you doing about the fit of the doors?

Paul Lyons

-----Original Message-----
From: Rob Adams <steamera@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Mon, Jun 28, 2010 8:23 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Wabash 50' #19000-19124 Autocar




Paul/Tim/Ron;

The Wabash 19000-19124 series were built with wood running boards, as
was the very similar 18000-18024 series with end doors. The 18000-18024
cars did indeed have Youngstown doors. Both series of cars had the
frequent Wabash preference of Miner power hand brakes with D3384
malleable iron hand wheel. (The Kadee, DA or similar Miner hand brake
parts will work)

For trucks, use an AAR spring plankless truck (NOT the Accurail, which
has spring planks). I'd suggest the Proto 2000 AAR truck as a good option.

Ron's warning about the side sill reinforcements is an excellent one.
The instructions with the mini-kit aren't particularly clear, and the
photo with it suffers from reproduction problems which renders it of
marginal use. The reinforcement panel meets the car body where the
angle ends transition to a vertical edge.

An article about constructing a WAB 19000-19124 series model using the
Sunshine mini-kit will appear in the next issue (Number 3) of /The
Wabash Modeler/ (TWM), available through membership in the Wabash
Railroad Historical Society. TWM Number 3 will also have an article
about the Wabash 50' express refrigerator cars. This will include
techniques for modifying the Walthers or BLI models to more accurately
represent the Wabash 950-974 series. A discussion of modeling options
in O and N scales will accompany the article.

Freight car fans may also be interested in TWM Number 1, which contains
an article about the Wabash 1958 cu ft covered hoppers (Think
Intermountain's model in HO). The article contained several builders
and in service photos, along with modeling discussion in multiple scales.

Regards, Rob Adams

On 6/28/10 5:26 PM, mopacfirst wrote:

I also am 'working on one'. The doors actually went onto a MoPac car
that I did, but the under-door bracing is still going to go onto a
Wabash car. Chet French graciously sent me a couple extra photos, from
which I concluded that the roofwalk is very likely wood based on how
the latitudinal running boards are attached. I also concluded that the
trucks are one of those with the two outer springs pretty far apart,
such as the Accurail 'Bettendorf' truck.

You may not care about this, but it appears that the lower numbered
cars in this block had Youngstown doors. The break was reported to be
around 19050, but no evidence shows the exact point. There was also a
group of end-door cars, 18000-18024, which appears to have Youngstown
doors.

I screwed up the first time, trying to mount the reinforcement under
the edge of the sill. Actually, it's supposed to mount behind the
sill, and the vertical portions of the end on the resin piece go
behind the plastic. Mine are still salvageable, but I'm waiting now
until I feel like stripping another Life-Like car. You may need to
file a bit of clearance between the resin parts and the underframe,
but the fit is so sloppy on the Life-Like car it may not be necessary.

Ron Merrick

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>;, Tim
O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Paul

The Wabash Freight Car Equipment listing of 12/1964 lists many
specs for 19000-19124 but has no column at all for running boards.
But since the cars were built in 1942, wood running boards were
still legal for new car construction at that time.

For the trucks it only says "Bettendorf Self Aligning". I can safely
say they are NOT ASF A-3 or Barber S-2 since the listings show those
under many other cars. So pick a pre-war "Bettendorf" and you'll be
close.

Interestingly the listings show VULCAN trucks used on several groups
of box cars in 1964, including some built in 1960. Wabash sometimes
recycled old trucks on new freight cars.

Tim O'Connor


I am finishing one of the Sunshine "Mini" kits. It is one where a
Proto 2000 double door boxcar is converted to a Wabash auto car in the
#19000-19124 series. The photo that is part of the instructions is not
very clear, therefore, I need a little help to finish it accurately.
Can someone tell what trucks were used on the prototype? Also, the
instructions says the prototype used a wood running board, but in the
photo the running board looks awful "thin" like it might be steel. Can
someone confirm the running board on the prototype was wood?

Any and all help is appreciated.
Thanks.
Paul Lyons








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Rob Adams
 

Hi Paul;

I can't comment about the door fit as I've mostly bailed out of HO and
am modeling in O/P:48 now. I'll defer that discussion to my HO modeler
on this project...Mr. Pierre Oliver. It sounds as though your solution
is a good one though.

My modeling of these cars would use a Pecos River car with scratchbuilt
side sill reinforcement and other modifcations.

Regards, Rob

On 6/28/10 10:50 PM, cobrapsl@... wrote:


Thanks Rob,

I figured out the door reinforcement piece the second time around! (G)
The bigger problem I had was that the resin Superior doors did not fit
between the the Proto 2000 shell door tracks. I was basically going to
have to ruin the door looks by filing them down to fit. So I just cut
off the entire side sill and scratch built a new one with the bottom
door track "lowered" slightly as in the photo. About then is when I
realized how the door reinforcement piece attached. What are you doing
about the fit of the doors?

Paul Lyons

-----Original Message-----
From: Rob Adams <steamera@... <mailto:steamera%40netins.net>>
To: STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Mon, Jun 28, 2010 8:23 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Wabash 50' #19000-19124 Autocar

Paul/Tim/Ron;

The Wabash 19000-19124 series were built with wood running boards, as
was the very similar 18000-18024 series with end doors. The 18000-18024
cars did indeed have Youngstown doors. Both series of cars had the
frequent Wabash preference of Miner power hand brakes with D3384
malleable iron hand wheel. (The Kadee, DA or similar Miner hand brake
parts will work)

For trucks, use an AAR spring plankless truck (NOT the Accurail, which
has spring planks). I'd suggest the Proto 2000 AAR truck as a good option.

Ron's warning about the side sill reinforcements is an excellent one.
The instructions with the mini-kit aren't particularly clear, and the
photo with it suffers from reproduction problems which renders it of
marginal use. The reinforcement panel meets the car body where the
angle ends transition to a vertical edge.

An article about constructing a WAB 19000-19124 series model using the
Sunshine mini-kit will appear in the next issue (Number 3) of /The
Wabash Modeler/ (TWM), available through membership in the Wabash
Railroad Historical Society. TWM Number 3 will also have an article
about the Wabash 50' express refrigerator cars. This will include
techniques for modifying the Walthers or BLI models to more accurately
represent the Wabash 950-974 series. A discussion of modeling options
in O and N scales will accompany the article.

Freight car fans may also be interested in TWM Number 1, which contains
an article about the Wabash 1958 cu ft covered hoppers (Think
Intermountain's model in HO). The article contained several builders
and in service photos, along with modeling discussion in multiple scales.

Regards, Rob Adams

On 6/28/10 5:26 PM, mopacfirst wrote:

I also am 'working on one'. The doors actually went onto a MoPac car
that I did, but the under-door bracing is still going to go onto a
Wabash car. Chet French graciously sent me a couple extra photos, from
which I concluded that the roofwalk is very likely wood based on how
the latitudinal running boards are attached. I also concluded that the
trucks are one of those with the two outer springs pretty far apart,
such as the Accurail 'Bettendorf' truck.

You may not care about this, but it appears that the lower numbered
cars in this block had Youngstown doors. The break was reported to be
around 19050, but no evidence shows the exact point. There was also a
group of end-door cars, 18000-18024, which appears to have Youngstown
doors.

I screwed up the first time, trying to mount the reinforcement under
the edge of the sill. Actually, it's supposed to mount behind the
sill, and the vertical portions of the end on the resin piece go
behind the plastic. Mine are still salvageable, but I'm waiting now
until I feel like stripping another Life-Like car. You may need to
file a bit of clearance between the resin parts and the underframe,
but the fit is so sloppy on the Life-Like car it may not be necessary.

Ron Merrick

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>;, Tim
O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Paul

The Wabash Freight Car Equipment listing of 12/1964 lists many
specs for 19000-19124 but has no column at all for running boards.
But since the cars were built in 1942, wood running boards were
still legal for new car construction at that time.

For the trucks it only says "Bettendorf Self Aligning". I can safely
say they are NOT ASF A-3 or Barber S-2 since the listings show those
under many other cars. So pick a pre-war "Bettendorf" and you'll be
close.

Interestingly the listings show VULCAN trucks used on several groups
of box cars in 1964, including some built in 1960. Wabash sometimes
recycled old trucks on new freight cars.

Tim O'Connor


I am finishing one of the Sunshine "Mini" kits. It is one where a
Proto 2000 double door boxcar is converted to a Wabash auto car in the
#19000-19124 series. The photo that is part of the instructions is not
very clear, therefore, I need a little help to finish it accurately.
Can someone tell what trucks were used on the prototype? Also, the
instructions says the prototype used a wood running board, but in the
photo the running board looks awful "thin" like it might be steel. Can
someone confirm the running board on the prototype was wood?

Any and all help is appreciated.
Thanks.
Paul Lyons
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Pierre <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Lurking time is over on this topic. I've been dragged in! :-)
I've just completed 2 of the cars in question, and had no problem with the fit of the doors. I have 2 more to do in the future so we'll have to see what happens.

The issue with the side sill reinforcement piece was a tad aggravating but easy to rectify. On both of my cars the crossbearers had to be trimmed to allow the part to slide in.

For me it was mostly an object lesson in making sure you have good photos on hand. The grainy photocopy on the instruction sheet was not clear enough and the photo of Ted Culotta's model on Steam Era Freight cars was too small to make out this detail clearly.

Rob is the one who caught my error while reviewing the photos I submitted for the Wabash Modeler. To him I am very thankful for catching this error.

There is another lesson to be learned from this as well, that I think we can all relate to from time to time. When I started this project I made a quick assumption about the location of the side sill addition. In retrospect that incorrect assumption then coloured my thinking about the model. As soon as Rob pointed out my error it was obvious what I had done. In future I'll be more likely to ask a few more questions.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@..., Rob Adams <steamera@...> wrote:

Hi Paul;

I can't comment about the door fit as I've mostly bailed out of HO and
am modeling in O/P:48 now. I'll defer that discussion to my HO modeler
on this project...Mr. Pierre Oliver. It sounds as though your solution
is a good one though.

My modeling of these cars would use a Pecos River car with scratchbuilt
side sill reinforcement and other modifcations.

Regards, Rob

On 6/28/10 10:50 PM, cobrapsl@... wrote:


Thanks Rob,

I figured out the door reinforcement piece the second time around! (G)
The bigger problem I had was that the resin Superior doors did not fit
between the the Proto 2000 shell door tracks. I was basically going to
have to ruin the door looks by filing them down to fit. So I just cut
off the entire side sill and scratch built a new one with the bottom
door track "lowered" slightly as in the photo. About then is when I
realized how the door reinforcement piece attached. What are you doing
about the fit of the doors?

Paul Lyons

-----Original Message-----
From: Rob Adams <steamera@... <mailto:steamera%40netins.net>>
To: STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Mon, Jun 28, 2010 8:23 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Wabash 50' #19000-19124 Autocar

Paul/Tim/Ron;

The Wabash 19000-19124 series were built with wood running boards, as
was the very similar 18000-18024 series with end doors. The 18000-18024
cars did indeed have Youngstown doors. Both series of cars had the
frequent Wabash preference of Miner power hand brakes with D3384
malleable iron hand wheel. (The Kadee, DA or similar Miner hand brake
parts will work)

For trucks, use an AAR spring plankless truck (NOT the Accurail, which
has spring planks). I'd suggest the Proto 2000 AAR truck as a good option.

Ron's warning about the side sill reinforcements is an excellent one.
The instructions with the mini-kit aren't particularly clear, and the
photo with it suffers from reproduction problems which renders it of
marginal use. The reinforcement panel meets the car body where the
angle ends transition to a vertical edge.

An article about constructing a WAB 19000-19124 series model using the
Sunshine mini-kit will appear in the next issue (Number 3) of /The
Wabash Modeler/ (TWM), available through membership in the Wabash
Railroad Historical Society. TWM Number 3 will also have an article
about the Wabash 50' express refrigerator cars. This will include
techniques for modifying the Walthers or BLI models to more accurately
represent the Wabash 950-974 series. A discussion of modeling options
in O and N scales will accompany the article.

Freight car fans may also be interested in TWM Number 1, which contains
an article about the Wabash 1958 cu ft covered hoppers (Think
Intermountain's model in HO). The article contained several builders
and in service photos, along with modeling discussion in multiple scales.

Regards, Rob Adams

On 6/28/10 5:26 PM, mopacfirst wrote:

I also am 'working on one'. The doors actually went onto a MoPac car
that I did, but the under-door bracing is still going to go onto a
Wabash car. Chet French graciously sent me a couple extra photos, from
which I concluded that the roofwalk is very likely wood based on how
the latitudinal running boards are attached. I also concluded that the
trucks are one of those with the two outer springs pretty far apart,
such as the Accurail 'Bettendorf' truck.

You may not care about this, but it appears that the lower numbered
cars in this block had Youngstown doors. The break was reported to be
around 19050, but no evidence shows the exact point. There was also a
group of end-door cars, 18000-18024, which appears to have Youngstown
doors.

I screwed up the first time, trying to mount the reinforcement under
the edge of the sill. Actually, it's supposed to mount behind the
sill, and the vertical portions of the end on the resin piece go
behind the plastic. Mine are still salvageable, but I'm waiting now
until I feel like stripping another Life-Like car. You may need to
file a bit of clearance between the resin parts and the underframe,
but the fit is so sloppy on the Life-Like car it may not be necessary.

Ron Merrick

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>;, Tim
O'Connor <timboconnor@> wrote:

Paul

The Wabash Freight Car Equipment listing of 12/1964 lists many
specs for 19000-19124 but has no column at all for running boards.
But since the cars were built in 1942, wood running boards were
still legal for new car construction at that time.

For the trucks it only says "Bettendorf Self Aligning". I can safely
say they are NOT ASF A-3 or Barber S-2 since the listings show those
under many other cars. So pick a pre-war "Bettendorf" and you'll be
close.

Interestingly the listings show VULCAN trucks used on several groups
of box cars in 1964, including some built in 1960. Wabash sometimes
recycled old trucks on new freight cars.

Tim O'Connor


I am finishing one of the Sunshine "Mini" kits. It is one where a
Proto 2000 double door boxcar is converted to a Wabash auto car in the
#19000-19124 series. The photo that is part of the instructions is not
very clear, therefore, I need a little help to finish it accurately.
Can someone tell what trucks were used on the prototype? Also, the
instructions says the prototype used a wood running board, but in the
photo the running board looks awful "thin" like it might be steel. Can
someone confirm the running board on the prototype was wood?

Any and all help is appreciated.
Thanks.
Paul Lyons
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]