Squadron Putty & Resin Kits


Paul Hillman
 

I tried filling some holes, etc. with "Squadron Putty" on some F&C resin kit parts and it didn't stick good at all; broke out of the holes very easily after a several day drying time. Any one with ideas about how to use it on resin? Apparently the two don't like to adhere well.

Also, when trying to apply small amounts of "Squadron Putty" it dries very quickly on the surface and doesn't allow you to spread it around easily. It's base is "Toluene". Anyone try to, say, mix it with some more toluene, maybe, or another solvent, to extend it's work-ability?

Thanks, Paul Hillman


Jack Burgess
 

<I tried filling some holes, etc. with "Squadron Putty" on some F&C resin
<kit parts and it didn't stick good at all; broke out of the holes very
<easily after a several day drying time. Any one with ideas about how to
<use it on resin? Apparently the two don't like to adhere well.
<
<Also, when trying to apply small amounts of "Squadron Putty" it dries
<very quickly on the surface and doesn't allow you to spread it around
<easily. It's base is "Toluene". Anyone try to, say, mix it with some
<more toluene, maybe, or another solvent, to extend it's work-ability?
<
<Thanks, Paul Hillman

I've been using Bondo Glazing & Spot Putty for styrene and possibly resin
too. I know I haven't problems using is on styrene and don't recall any
problems with resin. It is available at auto parts stores.


Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Tim O'Connor
 

Paul, if the holes are small, I use thin CA. It's easy to work with,
easy to sop up any excess and it dries hard and smooth. I sometimes use
it as a "wash" over top of putty since putty doesn't have a perfectly
smooth finish. For big holes, I'd use a base layer of slow drying epoxy
and then backfill with CA.

Tim O'Connor

I tried filling some holes, etc. with "Squadron Putty" on some F&C resin kit parts and it didn't stick good at all; broke out of the holes very easily after a several day drying time. Any one with ideas about how to use it on resin? Apparently the two don't like to adhere well.

Also, when trying to apply small amounts of "Squadron Putty" it dries very quickly on the surface and doesn't allow you to spread it around easily. It's base is "Toluene". Anyone try to, say, mix it with some more toluene, maybe, or another solvent, to extend it's work-ability?

Thanks, Paul Hillman


Bill Welch
 

Usually when I have to repair a hole, it is because of a mistake I have made either measuring or drilling or both. I like using styrene rod for these kinds of situations. Once I have determined what size rod need, which sometimes means enlarging the hole slightly, I flood it with Testors liquid on the surface and the underside and may do this several times, melting the styrene into hole. Sometime I will apply some ACC on the reverse side and will then use a sharp chisel blade to trim the rod on the visible side. Generally the repair is invisible.

BTW, in a packet of rod, I have noticed there is some variation in the size of the rod, so trying a few different piece of rod will likely yield a fit when you get close. Also, the rod is not always the same end to end.

This can be done almost more quickly than it takes time to talk about.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "behillman" <chris_hillman@...> wrote:

I tried filling some holes, etc. with "Squadron Putty" on some F&C resin kit parts and it didn't stick good at all; broke out of the holes very easily after a several day drying time. Any one with ideas about how to use it on resin? Apparently the two don't like to adhere well.

Also, when trying to apply small amounts of "Squadron Putty" it dries very quickly on the surface and doesn't allow you to spread it around easily. It's base is "Toluene". Anyone try to, say, mix it with some more toluene, maybe, or another solvent, to extend it's work-ability?

Thanks, Paul Hillman


Paul Hillman
 

Jack, and all,

Bondo "Glazing & Spot Putty" might be a better material. I have some from working on my vehicle paint jobs I'm doing also. I think it has a longer work-time and sticks to about anything which is cleaned well. Nice call!

The holes I'm having to fill are, yes, mistakes I made in drilling some counter-sunk holes for screws in the wrong places, to make a car-floor removable. They're like 1/16" dia. in 1/16" material and counter-sunk. There are also some casting-flaws in the car body that need filling & filing.

Let's see how the old "Bondo trick" comes through.

Thanks, Paul Hillman

----- Original Message -----
From: Jack Burgess<mailto:jack@yosemitevalleyrr.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2010 2:02 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Squadron Putty & Resin Kits



<I tried filling some holes, etc. with "Squadron Putty" on some F&C resin
<kit parts and it didn't stick good at all; broke out of the holes very
<easily after a several day drying time. Any one with ideas about how to
<use it on resin? Apparently the two don't like to adhere well.
<
<Also, when trying to apply small amounts of "Squadron Putty" it dries
<very quickly on the surface and doesn't allow you to spread it around
<easily. It's base is "Toluene". Anyone try to, say, mix it with some
<more toluene, maybe, or another solvent, to extend it's work-ability?
<
<Thanks, Paul Hillman

I've been using Bondo Glazing & Spot Putty for styrene and possibly resin
too. I know I haven't problems using is on styrene and don't recall any
problems with resin. It is available at auto parts stores.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

To thin or keep soft Squadron and other similar putties, use Testor's Liquid Cement. The thinner it is, the more it shrinks, though.

I agree with the others that resin is best filled with thick (gap-flling) superglue. Accellerator helps the process. You must sand it soon after it dries, however, because overnight it will become harder than the resin (bad for sanding).

Large areas (1/8 inch diameter or more) are best filled with some epoxy putty. The hardware store stuff is fine.

For pinholes, use a Gunze Sangyo product, "Mr. Surfacer 500". It is like a very thick paint but dries hard and wet sands easily.

A key to puttying models: Spend your time dry-fitting and trimming the pices before gluing them rather than sanding filler afterwards. Also, only use the minimum amount of filler. Minimum filler addition = minimum filler removal = minimum detail lost.

Don't bother with a gray primer (or any primer at all) - it just hides detail. If you want to check for defects, paint it your final color. Inspect, sand, fill, and sand as needed, then wash it clean and paint the final coats. It's always worked as good as anything else for me.

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: behillman

I tried filling some holes, etc. with "Squadron Putty" on some F&C resin kit parts and it didn't stick good at all; broke out of the holes very easily after a several day drying time. Any one with ideas about how to use it on resin? Apparently the two don't like to adhere well.

Also, when trying to apply small amounts of "Squadron Putty" it dries very quickly on the surface and doesn't allow you to spread it around easily. It's base is "Toluene". Anyone try to, say, mix it with some more toluene, maybe, or another solvent, to extend it's work-ability?


Frank Valoczy <destron@...>
 

The Squadron putty I've only had any success with using it on styrene, and
then only by thinning it some with Testors liquid. But more recently I
discovered the Tamiya putty, which is considerably thinner than the
Squadron stuff, so much easier to work with; I'm satisfied with the
results I get with the Tamiya putty for the larger gaps/holes. Also, I
also rather like Mr. Surfacer for smaller surface nicks/gapes/etc that
need filling.

I've never seen these at any shop carrying railway hobby products - I get
both at a place specialising in armour and aircraft kits.

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC

----- Original Message -----
From: Jack Burgess<mailto:jack@yosemitevalleyrr.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2010 2:02 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Squadron Putty & Resin Kits



<I tried filling some holes, etc. with "Squadron Putty" on some F&C
resin
<kit parts and it didn't stick good at all; broke out of the holes very
<easily after a several day drying time. Any one with ideas about how to
<use it on resin? Apparently the two don't like to adhere well.
<
<Also, when trying to apply small amounts of "Squadron Putty" it dries
<very quickly on the surface and doesn't allow you to spread it around
<easily. It's base is "Toluene". Anyone try to, say, mix it with some
<more toluene, maybe, or another solvent, to extend it's work-ability?
<
<Thanks, Paul Hillman

I've been using Bondo Glazing & Spot Putty for styrene and possibly
resin
too. I know I haven't problems using is on styrene and don't recall any
problems with resin. It is available at auto parts stores.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com









------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




!DSPAM:1291,4c7ab8a1177555656516607!


Rob & Bev Manley
 

Paul,
I agree with the red Bondo spot putty.It has worked well and I have used it for years with no ill results.

Rob Manley

----- Original Message -----
From: Paul Hillman
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2010 2:44 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Squadron Putty & Resin Kits



Jack, and all,

Bondo "Glazing & Spot Putty" might be a better material. I have some from working on my vehicle paint jobs I'm doing also. I think it has a longer work-time and sticks to about anything which is cleaned well. Nice call!

The holes I'm having to fill are, yes, mistakes I made in drilling some counter-sunk holes for screws in the wrong places, to make a car-floor removable. They're like 1/16" dia. in 1/16" material and counter-sunk. There are also some casting-flaws in the car body that need filling & filing.

Let's see how the old "Bondo trick" comes through.

Thanks, Paul Hillman

----- Original Message -----
From: Jack Burgess<mailto:jack@yosemitevalleyrr.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2010 2:02 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Squadron Putty & Resin Kits

<I tried filling some holes, etc. with "Squadron Putty" on some F&C resin
<kit parts and it didn't stick good at all; broke out of the holes very
<easily after a several day drying time. Any one with ideas about how to
<use it on resin? Apparently the two don't like to adhere well.
<
<Also, when trying to apply small amounts of "Squadron Putty" it dries
<very quickly on the surface and doesn't allow you to spread it around
<easily. It's base is "Toluene". Anyone try to, say, mix it with some
<more toluene, maybe, or another solvent, to extend it's work-ability?
<
<Thanks, Paul Hillman

I've been using Bondo Glazing & Spot Putty for styrene and possibly resin
too. I know I haven't problems using is on styrene and don't recall any
problems with resin. It is available at auto parts stores.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Andy Carlson
 

I have been a big fan of Ace Hardware's "2-Ton" epoxy, a long cure rate 50/50
epoxy. It seems to have a finished harness which mimics the styrene base
material well, which when sanding/filing doesn't recess, saving having to do a
2nd or more additional coats. Drills, taps and reinforces well on styrene. With
a hole to fill, by placing a taut piece of clear Scotch Tape bridging the gap, a
back-fill of epoxy gives a repair which mostly doesn't even require any sanding.


I don't like 5-minute epoxy, it should be left behind at your store,
unpurchased.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA





________________________________
From: Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@verizon.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sun, August 29, 2010 1:40:30 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Squadron Putty & Resin Kits


To thin or keep soft Squadron and other similar putties, use Testor's Liquid
Cement. The thinner it is, the more it shrinks, though.

I agree with the others that resin is best filled with thick (gap-flling)
superglue. Accellerator helps the process. You must sand it soon after it
dries, however, because overnight it will become harder than the resin (bad
for sanding).

Large areas (1/8 inch diameter or more) are best filled with some epoxy
putty. The hardware store stuff is fine.

For pinholes, use a Gunze Sangyo product, "Mr. Surfacer 500". It is like a
very thick paint but dries hard and wet sands easily.

A key to puttying models: Spend your time dry-fitting and trimming the
pices before gluing them rather than sanding filler afterwards. Also, only
use the minimum amount of filler. Minimum filler addition = minimum filler
removal = minimum detail lost.

Don't bother with a gray primer (or any primer at all) - it just hides
detail. If you want to check for defects, paint it your final color.
Inspect, sand, fill, and sand as needed, then wash it clean and paint the
final coats. It's always worked as good as anything else for me.

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: behillman

I tried filling some holes, etc. with "Squadron Putty" on some F&C resin kit
parts and it didn't stick good at all; broke out of the holes very easily
after a several day drying time. Any one with ideas about how to use it on
resin? Apparently the two don't like to adhere well.

Also, when trying to apply small amounts of "Squadron Putty" it dries very
quickly on the surface and doesn't allow you to spread it around easily.
It's base is "Toluene". Anyone try to, say, mix it with some more toluene,
maybe, or another solvent, to extend it's work-ability?




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

I was talking about putty, not liquid cement.

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Andy Carlson

I don't like 5-minute epoxy, it should be left behind at your store, unpurchased.


Armand Premo
 

FWIW I have used Squadron green and white putty as well as Ace 5 minute epoxy for years without a problem .The two ton epoxy is also great if you are not in a hurry.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: Andy Carlson
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2010 7:14 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Squadron Putty & Resin Kits



I have been a big fan of Ace Hardware's "2-Ton" epoxy, a long cure rate 50/50
epoxy. It seems to have a finished harness which mimics the styrene base
material well, which when sanding/filing doesn't recess, saving having to do a
2nd or more additional coats. Drills, taps and reinforces well on styrene. With
a hole to fill, by placing a taut piece of clear Scotch Tape bridging the gap, a
back-fill of epoxy gives a repair which mostly doesn't even require any sanding.

I don't like 5-minute epoxy, it should be left behind at your store,
unpurchased.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

________________________________
From: Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@verizon.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sun, August 29, 2010 1:40:30 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Squadron Putty & Resin Kits

To thin or keep soft Squadron and other similar putties, use Testor's Liquid
Cement. The thinner it is, the more it shrinks, though.

I agree with the others that resin is best filled with thick (gap-flling)
superglue. Accellerator helps the process. You must sand it soon after it
dries, however, because overnight it will become harder than the resin (bad
for sanding).

Large areas (1/8 inch diameter or more) are best filled with some epoxy
putty. The hardware store stuff is fine.

For pinholes, use a Gunze Sangyo product, "Mr. Surfacer 500". It is like a
very thick paint but dries hard and wet sands easily.

A key to puttying models: Spend your time dry-fitting and trimming the
pices before gluing them rather than sanding filler afterwards. Also, only
use the minimum amount of filler. Minimum filler addition = minimum filler
removal = minimum detail lost.

Don't bother with a gray primer (or any primer at all) - it just hides
detail. If you want to check for defects, paint it your final color.
Inspect, sand, fill, and sand as needed, then wash it clean and paint the
final coats. It's always worked as good as anything else for me.

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: behillman

I tried filling some holes, etc. with "Squadron Putty" on some F&C resin kit
parts and it didn't stick good at all; broke out of the holes very easily
after a several day drying time. Any one with ideas about how to use it on
resin? Apparently the two don't like to adhere well.

Also, when trying to apply small amounts of "Squadron Putty" it dries very
quickly on the surface and doesn't allow you to spread it around easily.
It's base is "Toluene". Anyone try to, say, mix it with some more toluene,
maybe, or another solvent, to extend it's work-ability?








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Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

The red Bondo putty works well for me. It can be cut with Testor's solvent. I also brush a little bit of solvent into the top of the tube when closing it up, or else it'll dry out a bit.

Gunze Sangyo "Mr. Surfacer" I can also reccommend, having used it on many resin kits. Including a resin coach kit that I have become very anal retentive about the finish on. This stuff, when painted on, shows bad joints and flaws immediately. It's nice to find them before painting a model.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Rob & Bev Manley" <robev1630@...> wrote:

Paul,
I agree with the red Bondo spot putty.It has worked well and I have used it for years with no ill results.

Rob Manley

----- Original Message -----
From: Paul Hillman
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2010 2:44 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Squadron Putty & Resin Kits



Jack, and all,

Bondo "Glazing & Spot Putty" might be a better material. I have some from working on my vehicle paint jobs I'm doing also. I think it has a longer work-time and sticks to about anything which is cleaned well. Nice call!

The holes I'm having to fill are, yes, mistakes I made in drilling some counter-sunk holes for screws in the wrong places, to make a car-floor removable. They're like 1/16" dia. in 1/16" material and counter-sunk. There are also some casting-flaws in the car body that need filling & filing.

Let's see how the old "Bondo trick" comes through.

Thanks, Paul Hillman

----- Original Message -----
From: Jack Burgess<mailto:jack@...>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2010 2:02 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Squadron Putty & Resin Kits

<I tried filling some holes, etc. with "Squadron Putty" on some F&C resin
<kit parts and it didn't stick good at all; broke out of the holes very
<easily after a several day drying time. Any one with ideas about how to
<use it on resin? Apparently the two don't like to adhere well.
<
<Also, when trying to apply small amounts of "Squadron Putty" it dries
<very quickly on the surface and doesn't allow you to spread it around
<easily. It's base is "Toluene". Anyone try to, say, mix it with some
<more toluene, maybe, or another solvent, to extend it's work-ability?
<
<Thanks, Paul Hillman

I've been using Bondo Glazing & Spot Putty for styrene and possibly resin
too. I know I haven't problems using is on styrene and don't recall any
problems with resin. It is available at auto parts stores.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Bob Sterner
 

Testors sells a white putty in a tube that is thinner and easier to work with than Squadron.

Bob Sterner

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Lucas" <stevelucas3@...> wrote:

The red Bondo putty works well for me. It can be cut with Testor's solvent. I also brush a little bit of solvent into the top of the tube when closing it up, or else it'll dry out a bit.

Gunze Sangyo "Mr. Surfacer" I can also reccommend, having used it on many resin kits. Including a resin coach kit that I have become very anal retentive about the finish on. This stuff, when painted on, shows bad joints and flaws immediately. It's nice to find them before painting a model.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Rob & Bev Manley" <robev1630@> wrote:

Paul,
I agree with the red Bondo spot putty.It has worked well and I have used it for years with no ill results.

Rob Manley

----- Original Message -----
From: Paul Hillman
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2010 2:44 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Squadron Putty & Resin Kits



Jack, and all,

Bondo "Glazing & Spot Putty" might be a better material. I have some from working on my vehicle paint jobs I'm doing also. I think it has a longer work-time and sticks to about anything which is cleaned well. Nice call!

The holes I'm having to fill are, yes, mistakes I made in drilling some counter-sunk holes for screws in the wrong places, to make a car-floor removable. They're like 1/16" dia. in 1/16" material and counter-sunk. There are also some casting-flaws in the car body that need filling & filing.

Let's see how the old "Bondo trick" comes through.

Thanks, Paul Hillman

----- Original Message -----
From: Jack Burgess<mailto:jack@>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2010 2:02 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Squadron Putty & Resin Kits

<I tried filling some holes, etc. with "Squadron Putty" on some F&C resin
<kit parts and it didn't stick good at all; broke out of the holes very
<easily after a several day drying time. Any one with ideas about how to
<use it on resin? Apparently the two don't like to adhere well.
<
<Also, when trying to apply small amounts of "Squadron Putty" it dries
<very quickly on the surface and doesn't allow you to spread it around
<easily. It's base is "Toluene". Anyone try to, say, mix it with some
<more toluene, maybe, or another solvent, to extend it's work-ability?
<
<Thanks, Paul Hillman

I've been using Bondo Glazing & Spot Putty for styrene and possibly resin
too. I know I haven't problems using is on styrene and don't recall any
problems with resin. It is available at auto parts stores.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


michaelashelley <mashelley@...>
 

I thin Squadron white putty with acetone (Cutex Nail Polish Remover, because that's what I have on hand.) It can be smoothed with a cotton swab dipped in acetone as well. However, I have not tried using it on resin.

Squadron white putty seems to have a finer grain than their green putty.

M.A.Shelley

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "behillman" <chris_hillman@...> wrote:

I tried filling some holes, etc. with "Squadron Putty" on some F&C resin kit parts and it didn't stick good at all; broke out of the holes very easily after a several day drying time. Any one with ideas about how to use it on resin? Apparently the two don't like to adhere well.

Also, when trying to apply small amounts of "Squadron Putty" it dries very quickly on the surface and doesn't allow you to spread it around easily. It's base is "Toluene". Anyone try to, say, mix it with some more toluene, maybe, or another solvent, to extend it's work-ability?

Thanks, Paul Hillman


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

I've always been happy with Squadron Green, though it's true one needs to learn how to use it. I have not used it much with resin kits, but have not encountered any problems, either. The material does dry out and occasionally one has to squeeze out some discard material to reach fresh putty, but since a tube lasts me for years, I can hardly complain about a little waste.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

Andy Carlson has it just right in advising the use of a standard long-set epoxy to use as a filler choice; and to aalso avoid the 5 minute type, except in extremis [my term!].

An easier epoxy to use is an epoxy designed to be a filler, i.e. epoxy resin already filled with vinyl microballoons, or microfibres. These filler-resins are much lighter in weight, and are much easier to sand. I am still using for this purpose two small "sample" jars (resin and hardener) of very light weight sculpting epoxy handed out at the 2000 NMRA San Jose convention. Like with all epoxies, if the resin becomes stiff and turbid with time, just place the resin container in very hot water for a period of time, and the resin then becomes reconstituted (if that is the word) for another couple of years.

Something very much to keep in mind is that the polyester and epoxy-resin-based fillers set without shrinkage, while the solvent-based fillers always have the potential to always shrink to some extent: the more solvent, the more shrinkage (a cautionary note to those "thinning" putties).

All that said, I still use Squadron putty for tiny jobs where waiting overnight for handling is or would be a pain. I too also despair (kind word) at the shrinkage.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach, MD
Okoboji, Iowa


Jack Burgess
 

Denny mentioned:

<All that said, I still use Squadron putty for tiny jobs where waiting
<overnight for handling is or would be a pain. I too also despair (kind
<word) at the shrinkage.
<
<Denny

...which reminded me that the plastic model builders fill holes with CA set
with Accelerator. According to articles, they apply some CA and immediately
spray it with accelerator. It sets immediately and is easy to sand
immediately (but gets very hard in a little while). Multiple applications
could be used filling deeper areas.


Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Ed Mims
 

Bondo GLAZING & SPOT PUTTY is clearly the best all round filler for model building. It is available in a 4.5 oz tube at auto parts stores. Don't confuse this with the Bondo epoxy filler. This is a one part material, kind of orangey red in color and comes in a red, white and black tube. It will bond to almost anything and drys quickly. I keep it around for use on models but also use it around the house to fill holes in walls, woodwork, etc. It does not srink appreciably but in some cases might require a second (skim) coating to get a flat surface. It is the only filler I use.
 
Try to keep it off of your fingers. It bonds to them pretty tightly.
 
Ed Mims
Jacksonville, FL

--- On Mon, 8/30/10, Jack Burgess <jack@yosemitevalleyrr.com> wrote:


From: Jack Burgess <jack@yosemitevalleyrr.com>
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Squadron Putty & Resin Kits
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, August 30, 2010, 3:15 PM


 



Denny mentioned:

<All that said, I still use Squadron putty for tiny jobs where waiting
<overnight for handling is or would be a pain. I too also despair (kind
<word) at the shrinkage.
<
<Denny

...which reminded me that the plastic model builders fill holes with CA set
with Accelerator. According to articles, they apply some CA and immediately
spray it with accelerator. It sets immediately and is easy to sand
immediately (but gets very hard in a little while). Multiple applications
could be used filling deeper areas.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com











[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


StephenK
 

I occasionally read a British aircraft model magazine (the mag is British, not the planes!). In any case, the reviews of the models are quite complete. For very small cracks between parts, the builders often use correction fluid (like Wite-out) I have tried it and it works!

Steve Kay

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Andy Carlson <midcentury@...> wrote:

I have been a big fan of Ace Hardware's "2-Ton" epoxy, a long cure rate 50/50
epoxy. It seems to have a finished harness which mimics the styrene base
material well, which when sanding/filing doesn't recess, saving having to do a
2nd or more additional coats. Drills, taps and reinforces well on styrene. With
a hole to fill, by placing a taut piece of clear Scotch Tape bridging the gap, a
back-fill of epoxy gives a repair which mostly doesn't even require any sanding.


I don't like 5-minute epoxy, it should be left behind at your store,
unpurchased.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA





________________________________
From: Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sun, August 29, 2010 1:40:30 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Squadron Putty & Resin Kits


To thin or keep soft Squadron and other similar putties, use Testor's Liquid
Cement. The thinner it is, the more it shrinks, though.

I agree with the others that resin is best filled with thick (gap-flling)
superglue. Accellerator helps the process. You must sand it soon after it
dries, however, because overnight it will become harder than the resin (bad
for sanding).

Large areas (1/8 inch diameter or more) are best filled with some epoxy
putty. The hardware store stuff is fine.

For pinholes, use a Gunze Sangyo product, "Mr. Surfacer 500". It is like a
very thick paint but dries hard and wet sands easily.

A key to puttying models: Spend your time dry-fitting and trimming the
pices before gluing them rather than sanding filler afterwards. Also, only
use the minimum amount of filler. Minimum filler addition = minimum filler
removal = minimum detail lost.

Don't bother with a gray primer (or any primer at all) - it just hides
detail. If you want to check for defects, paint it your final color.
Inspect, sand, fill, and sand as needed, then wash it clean and paint the
final coats. It's always worked as good as anything else for me.

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: behillman

I tried filling some holes, etc. with "Squadron Putty" on some F&C resin kit
parts and it didn't stick good at all; broke out of the holes very easily
after a several day drying time. Any one with ideas about how to use it on
resin? Apparently the two don't like to adhere well.

Also, when trying to apply small amounts of "Squadron Putty" it dries very
quickly on the surface and doesn't allow you to spread it around easily.
It's base is "Toluene". Anyone try to, say, mix it with some more toluene,
maybe, or another solvent, to extend it's work-ability?




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Tim O'Connor
 

Jack

I mentioned the CA filling earlier, but personally I don't use the
accelerator. Thin CA will harden enough in 15-20 minutes for another
layer, and I let it all harden overnight. With a "pool" of CA (as
opposed to a seam) the accelerator produces a crystalizing effect
and a rough surface.

Tim O'Connor

...which reminded me that the plastic model builders fill holes with CA set
with Accelerator. According to articles, they apply some CA and immediately
spray it with accelerator. It sets immediately and is easy to sand
immediately (but gets very hard in a little while). Multiple applications
could be used filling deeper areas.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com