Tank Cars to Transport Molasses


Tim O'Connor
 

Victor

Molasses/sugar was usually transported in plain old ICC 103 tank
cars, from 8,000 to 12,000 gallons. They had heater pipes inside
the tank, into which steam was injected to warm the syrup when the
car was being unloaded. The Southern Pacific had a fleet of 12,500
gallon tank cars with the famous "S" diamond logo, that indicated
they could be used in this type of service.

Proto 2000 and Intermountain both offer paint schemes for cars in
corn syrup service -- same idea as molasses.

Tim O'Connor

I would like to know what suitable HO cars are available RTR or in
kit form to represent tank cars used to transport molasses. I am
modeling a large Purina mill located in Indiana in the early 1950's
that manufactures animal feed.

I do have an orange and black C.F Simonin's Sons of Philadelphia
Vegitable Oil Refiners car.
Victor Baird


Charles Etheredge
 

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Victor

Molasses/sugar was usually transported in plain old ICC 103 tank
cars, from 8,000 to 12,000 gallons. They had heater pipes inside
the tank, into which steam was injected to warm the syrup when the
car was being unloaded. The Southern Pacific had a fleet of 12,500
gallon tank cars with the famous "S" diamond logo, that indicated
they could be used in this type of service.

Proto 2000 and Intermountain both offer paint schemes for cars in
corn syrup service -- same idea as molasses.

Tim O'Connor

I would like to know what suitable HO cars are available RTR or in
kit form to represent tank cars used to transport molasses. I am
modeling a large Purina mill located in Indiana in the early 1950's
that manufactures animal feed.

I do have an orange and black C.F Simonin's Sons of Philadelphia
Vegitable Oil Refiners car.
Victor Baird
Tim,
I assume this would also apply to the transportion of cotton seed oil from cotton presses. I am modeling a facility in Texas that shipped cotton seed oil. One of their customers was a paint manufacturer in Louisiana. Would this typically be a UTLX, GATX, (whatever) tanker, reserved for other than petroleum use? Photos????

Charles Etheredge
Austin, Texas


reporterllc
 

Thanks for the info Tim.

Victor Baird
Fort Wayne, Indiana


reporterllc
 

Now all I need to do is figure out a likely origin for my molasses. Sugar beets manufactured in the Midwest?

"Jeff Wilson's Industries Along the Tracks 3" shows a 1959 map of sugar beet manufacturing facilities in the U.S.

Victor Baird
Fort Wayne, Indiana


rwitt_2000
 

"wabash2813" Victor Baird wrote:

Now all I need to do is figure out a likely origin for my molasses.
Sugar beets manufactured in the Midwest?

"Jeff Wilson's Industries Along the Tracks 3" shows a 1959 map of
sugar beet manufacturing facilities in the U.S.
Victor,

Buy the October 2010 issue of RMC that contains a 10-page article by
Richard Wehr on a sugar beet processing plant in Mason City, Iowa. There
a processing flow chart showing molasses as one of the by-products that
was mostly used for animal feed.

To Bill Welch there are some FGE reefers in the background in a photo of
a truck dumper on page 61 of the above article.

Bob Witt


Sigpress <thompson@...>
 

Charles Etheridge wrote:
SP tank cars were used for many commercial shipments including cottonseed oil.
Tony Thompson


Tim O'Connor
 

Plenty of sugar cane in Louisiana and eastern Texas too.

Another source of molasses is wood fiber -- there was an article
some while back of molasses production at a fibre-board mill in Duluth.

Tim O'Connor

At 10/2/2010 01:44 PM Saturday, you wrote:
Now all I need to do is figure out a likely origin for my molasses. Sugar beets manufactured in the Midwest?

"Jeff Wilson's Industries Along the Tracks 3" shows a 1959 map of sugar beet manufacturing facilities in the U.S.

Victor Baird
Fort Wayne, Indiana


Clark Propst
 

Victor,
There's a fantastic article in latest Craftsman.
Clark Propst


pullmanboss <tcmadden@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:

Plenty of sugar cane in Louisiana and eastern Texas too.

Another source of molasses is wood fiber -- there was an article
some while back of molasses production at a fibre-board mill in Duluth.
My not-so-reliable memory tells me that back in the '60s there was an RMC article by E. L. Moore on building a molasses mine. Carstens published article after article by Moore, almost all of them for funky little buildings, many of them (like the molasses mine) tongue-in-cheek. So I suppose if you want to continue in that vein :-), you could ship it in hoppers.

Tom Madden


Cyril Durrenberger
 

No sugar cane was raised in East Texas (or at least what those of us from Texas call East Texas) and not in Texas at all after about 1929 until the 1970's, well after the time period of this group.  The sugar refinery in Sugarland, Texas received the raw sugar from Louisiana.

Cyril Durrenberger

--- On Sat, 10/2/10, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Tank Cars to Transport Molasses
To: STMFC@...
Date: Saturday, October 2, 2010, 1:11 PM







 











Plenty of sugar cane in Louisiana and eastern Texas too.



Another source of molasses is wood fiber -- there was an article

some while back of molasses production at a fibre-board mill in Duluth.



Tim O'Connor



At 10/2/2010 01:44 PM Saturday, you wrote:

Now all I need to do is figure out a likely origin for my molasses. Sugar beets manufactured in the Midwest?
"Jeff Wilson's Industries Along the Tracks 3" shows a 1959 map of sugar beet manufacturing facilities in the U.S.
Victor Baird
Fort Wayne, Indiana





















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Allen Rueter
 

Victor, have you looked at the OpSig* Industry files?

--
Allen Rueter
StLouis MO




________________________________
From: wabash2813 <reporterllc@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sat, October 2, 2010 12:44:05 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Tank Cars to Transport Molasses


Now all I need to do is figure out a likely origin for my molasses. Sugar beets
manufactured in the Midwest?

"Jeff Wilson's Industries Along the Tracks 3" shows a 1959 map of sugar beet
manufacturing facilities in the U.S.

Victor Baird
Fort Wayne, Indiana







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]