Running crap


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Jack Burgess wrote:
If I know an operator is a detail-oriented scratchbuilder, I will relax the restrictions on them but I need to personally know that. (Darnaby can rerail all the cars he needs.)
I always thought this was a good guideline: don't touch it unless YOU are a scratchbuilder.
I greatly agree with Clark Propst about near-coupler details, air hoses and cut levers. They just seem to fly off the models on an operating layout. I haven't operated my current equipment that much, but I've pretty much stopped putting on cut levers so I'll be ready when the time comes <g>.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Tim O'Connor
 

I haven't had problems with cut levers made from wire. Air hoses
are no longer a problem with Hi-Tech rubber hoses!

What I see get broken a LOT are sill steps, ladders, brake wheels.
And handrails on tank cars. To say nothing of scuffing of paint
and lettering. :-(

And don't let anyone at the club near your car with the "coupler
height adjustment pliers". Standard treatment of a low coupler is
to bend the trip pin upwards towards the sky.

Tim O'Connor

I greatly agree with Clark Propst about near-coupler details, air
hoses and cut levers. They just seem to fly off the models on an
operating layout.
Tony Thompson


Bill Schneider
 

As another owner of an operating layout with a mixture of rolling stock types, I can honestly say that the LEAST damaged group of equipment on my layout are resin cars. This is followed by the remaining cast-on detail cars, and bringing up last place (most damaged) are the detailed plastic cars of which I am... err.... somewhat familiar.



My operating practices are somewhat Neanderthal. We do not use magnets or uncoupling sticks. We... HORRORS!!!.... handle the equipment to uncouple them. The biggest casualties are stirrup steps and brake wheels (why?) on plastic cars. The A-Line type steps on the resin cars are pretty much the last thing to break off.



In at least two instances over the years we have had resin cars come off the helix and head for the ground. One was an F&C Lehigh Valley "Wrong way" boxcar that turned itself back into a kit (its now been... re-shopped ). The other was one of Ted's " Essential Freight Cars" that is on loan that was (fortunately) caught by the operator (me) who was sitting in the  middle of the helix before it hit anything hard (Ted - you've off line, right... ?). Both instances were cause not by guest operator error but by layout owner error.



You just can't get good help....



Bill Schneider

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tim O'Connor" < timboconnor @comcast.net>
To: STMFC @ yahoogroups .com
Sent: Monday, October 4, 2010 4:16:36 PM
Subject: Re: [ STMFC ] Running crap

 





I haven't had problems with cut levers made from wire. Air hoses
are no longer a problem with Hi-Tech rubber hoses!

What I see get broken a LOT are sill steps, ladders, brake wheels.
And handrails on tank cars. To say nothing of scuffing of paint
and lettering. :-(

And don't let anyone at the club near your car with the "coupler
height adjustment pliers". Standard treatment of a low coupler is
to bend the trip pin upwards towards the sky.

Tim O'Connor

I greatly agree with Clark Propst about near-coupler details, air
hoses and cut levers. They just seem to fly off the models on an
operating layout.
Tony Thompson



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


mike brock <brockm@...>
 

Bill Schneider says:


"My operating practices are somewhat Neanderthal. We do not use magnets or uncoupling sticks. We... HORRORS!!!.... handle the equipment to uncouple them."

Is it possible that Bill learned such techniques from a layout located about 1700 miles south of him...near the Kennedy Space Center. I mean the term "Neanderthal" got my attention.

"In at least two instances over the years we have had resin cars come off the helix and head for the ground. One was an F&C Lehigh Valley "Wrong way" boxcar that turned itself back into a kit (its now been... re-shopped )."

Hmmm. That doesn't seem particularly unusual. A week ago I noticed a broken coupler lying on the track. Very prototypical actually. In fact you could probably make some good money driving along and collecting such stuff on serious grades like Sand Patch and Old Fort near Asheville, NC. I guess you'd need a good sized truck, however. Anyhow, mine was a bit unusual in that the entire coupler pocket was lying there. Further examination revealed a resin SP USRA SS box car with no coupler box. Noooo problem...except for the minor problem that the car's end was missing as well. Additional study revealed that the car was falling apart. In a matter of minutes I had a flat kit. It has been rebuilt....although with a bit of a sag in the roof. I never did find all of the missing roof supports. This is not bad, however, given that apparently all of the SP USRA SS box cars had been scrapped by 1953...

" Both instances were cause not by guest operator error but by layout owner error."

Layout owner??! You mean the layout owner erred? How unusual.<G>.

Mike Brock


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

mike brock wrote:
It has been rebuilt....although with a bit of a sag in the roof. I never did find all of the missing roof supports. This is not bad, however, given that apparently all of the SP USRA SS box cars had been scrapped by 1953...
Not at all, although none of the cars in the original USRA configuration were still in REVENUE service after 1950. Dozens became MW cars during the 1949 rebuilding of 650 (of the original 1000) cars with new steel sides and roofs, and kitbashed ends.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


mike brock <brockm@...>
 

Tony Thompson notes about the SP USRA SS box cars:

Not at all, although none of the cars in the original USRA
configuration were still in REVENUE service after 1950. Dozens became
MW cars during the 1949 rebuilding of 650 (of the original 1000) cars
with new steel sides and roofs, and kitbashed ends.
Are you saying that some remained "as built" in MW service? Hmmm. Rebuilds with steel sides would, of course, at least LOOK like a different car...regardless of what the IRS might have concluded. My SS does look a bit different...with its sagging roof. My guess is that it was lost swomewhere up on the Siskiyou line...probably on an overgrown siding or perhaps covered with snow or maybe on the line over to the Oregon coast. At any rate, it is rolling again...

Mike Brock


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

mike brock wrote:
Are you saying that some remained "as built" in MW service? Hmmm. Rebuilds with steel sides would, of course, at least LOOK like a different car...regardless of what the IRS might have concluded.
I can supply a correct SPMW number if you want--just do a "patch" job. They then carried company materials, and did sometimes go off line. The rebuilt steel cars did keep their original car numbers, a possible source of confusion for those not carefully reading the ORER, but they are called "all steel" therein, and did receive a different class number when rebuilt, B-50-12A.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history