Was: cement travel: Small town cement dealers


Nathan Obermeyer
 

I've really enjoyed the discussion on the cement plants. I just want to confirm that the cement plants being discussed are the ones that produce the actual cement raw material that is then later mixed with sand/etc to make concrete.

My interest lies in the small town cement dealers who would receive that product produced at the cement plants via the railroad and then mix the cement with sand/etc and then sell it to the local community like Petersen's Redi-mix would in Blue Rapids, KS. I will upload a picture of the plant circa 1950s-1960s in the photo section under the album named "Obermeyer photo album" in the photo section.

Petersen's had the Big Blue River and sand pits near by so they wouldn't need to bring sand in by rail, but they would require the cement.


Thanks,
Nate


Clark Propst
 

Nate,
"Cement Plants" make cement.
"Readi-Mix" (however you choose to spell it) or so called "Batch plants" mix, sell concrete.

One's a big place with big machinery and the other isn't : )

Around here railroad's covered hoppers were loaded for customers on-line.
I'd be interest to know how this was handled at plants served by only one railroad.

Clark Propst


Cyril Durrenberger
 

That is usually called a concrete batch plant.  Where they mix the cement and fly ash with sand and gravel, sometimes other things and water to make concrete which is then sent to the construction site.  For large projects they may mix the concrete on site.

Cyril Durrenberger

--- On Sat, 11/20/10, Nathan <obermeyern@...> wrote:

From: Nathan <obermeyern@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Was: cement travel: Small town cement dealers
To: STMFC@...
Date: Saturday, November 20, 2010, 7:42 AM







 









I've really enjoyed the discussion on the cement plants. I just want to confirm that the cement plants being discussed are the ones that produce the actual cement raw material that is then later mixed with sand/etc to make concrete.



My interest lies in the small town cement dealers who would receive that product produced at the cement plants via the railroad and then mix the cement with sand/etc and then sell it to the local community like Petersen's Redi-mix would in Blue Rapids, KS. I will upload a picture of the plant circa 1950s-1960s in the photo section under the album named "Obermeyer photo album" in the photo section.



Petersen's had the Big Blue River and sand pits near by so they wouldn't need to bring sand in by rail, but they would require the cement.



Thanks,

Nate






















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Clark Propst
 

Just for clarification. They put the dry mix (batch) in the truck first, then add the water !

Clark Propst


Tim O'Connor
 

There's a large batch plant in my town, Sterling MA, and it's mainly
known for its huge quarry operation (the afternoon dynamite blasts can
be heard and felt 3 miles away). But most traffic out of the plant
is concrete mixers, not gravel trucks... and I've never seen a single
cement (dry-flow) truck in 10 years of driving in this town. So I'm
guessing that the proportion of sand & gravel to cement in concrete is
very high indeed!

Tim O'Connor

At 11/20/2010 02:32 PM Saturday, you wrote:
That is usually called a concrete batch plant.� Where they mix the cement and fly ash with sand and gravel, sometimes other things and water to make concrete which is then sent to the construction site.� For large projects they may mix the concrete on site.

Cyril Durrenberger


Clark Propst
 

Haven't mixed any concrete by hand in 30 years. The ratio is on the bags sold at the lumber yard.
Clark Propst

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


There's a large batch plant in my town, Sterling MA, and it's mainly
known for its huge quarry operation (the afternoon dynamite blasts can
be heard and felt 3 miles away). But most traffic out of the plant
is concrete mixers, not gravel trucks... and I've never seen a single
cement (dry-flow) truck in 10 years of driving in this town. So I'm
guessing that the proportion of sand & gravel to cement in concrete is
very high indeed!

Tim O'Connor

At 11/20/2010 02:32 PM Saturday, you wrote:
That is usually called a concrete batch plant. Where they mix the cement and fly ash with sand and gravel, sometimes other things and water to make concrete which is then sent to the construction site. For large projects they may mix the concrete on site.

Cyril Durrenberger