Specialized Ore Cars and the Value of Captions


Don Strack
 

In a previous message thread, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:

Captions have to tell you something more than what you can already see in the picture. "Here we see an SD-45 in full roar as it crosses the Delaware River on the Mill Rift bridge." Gee, even that caption has facts in it that MIGHT not be evident to a casual reader, but any ERIE/EL fan will know all that already. But captions that include year, month, date if possible, direction of the photo, locomotive or other equipment ID, location, reason you should look at the photo, etc., etc. are all reasons to buy a book. <<
Although not freight car related, I'm in the middle of a project to caption over 200 photos of "Bingham Canyon Railroads", each with no less than 50 words and no more than 70 words. It is proving to be a real test of my knowledge of the subject, and my ability to write about it.

Would anyone care to comment on the features of these heavy duty ore cars, such as truck design, air brakes, etc.

http://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Utah-Copper-Ore-Cars/

Don Strack


Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

UC 599 is fitted with clasp brake shoes and a KD brake system. The car's frame is extended out past the end of the carbody, likely to allow longer truck spacing to spread the car's 125-ton weight (over the mine's trackage. As an ore car, this is a slightly unusual design with that extended frame.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., "donstrack" <donstrack@...> wrote:



In a previous message thread, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:

Captions have to tell you something more than what you can already see in the picture. "Here we see an SD-45 in full roar as it crosses the Delaware River on the Mill Rift bridge." Gee, even that caption has facts in it that MIGHT not be evident to a casual reader, but any ERIE/EL fan will know all that already. But captions that include year, month, date if possible, direction of the photo, locomotive or other equipment ID, location, reason you should look at the photo, etc., etc. are all reasons to buy a book. <<
Although not freight car related, I'm in the middle of a project to caption over 200 photos of "Bingham Canyon Railroads", each with no less than 50 words and no more than 70 words. It is proving to be a real test of my knowledge of the subject, and my ability to write about it.

Would anyone care to comment on the features of these heavy duty ore cars, such as truck design, air brakes, etc.

http://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Utah-Copper-Ore-Cars/

Don Strack


water.kresse@...
 

Don,



Very interesting.



These cars have a side construction reminding me of a short six-wheel trucked "Battleship Gons" of the 1920-1924 ear built for the Virginian (120/109-ton cars) and C&O (100/91-ton cars) railroads by PSCC and SSCC.  Their clasp brake 100-ton trucks remind me of  those blt by Buckeye Steel Casting in 1923 for the single PSCX-91 gondola car blt during the C&O run.



Al Kresse

----- Original Message -----
From: "donstrack" <donstrack@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, November 26, 2010 9:08:30 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Specialized Ore Cars and the Value of Captions



In a previous message thread, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:

Captions have to tell you something more than what you can already see in the picture.  "Here we see an SD-45 in full roar as it crosses the Delaware River on the Mill Rift bridge."  Gee, even that caption has facts in it that MIGHT not be evident to a casual reader, but any ERIE/EL fan will know all that already.  But captions that include year, month, date if possible, direction of the photo, locomotive or other equipment ID, location, reason you should look at the photo, etc., etc. are all reasons to buy a book. <<
Although not freight car related, I'm in the middle of a project to caption over 200 photos of "Bingham Canyon Railroads", each with no less than 50 words and no more than 70 words. It is proving to be a real test of my knowledge of the subject, and my ability to write about it.

Would anyone care to comment on the features of these heavy duty ore cars, such as truck design, air brakes, etc.

http://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Utah-Copper-Ore-Cars/

Don Strack



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


al_brown03
 

The truck sideframes are lettered "Vulcan", and that's an awfully wide spring package, almost looks like a Dalman. I'm not a truck expert, of course: would defer to those more knowledgeable.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@..., water.kresse@... wrote:



Don,



Very interesting.



These cars have a side construction reminding me of a short six-wheel trucked "Battleship Gons" of the 1920-1924 ear built for the Virginian (120/109-ton cars) and C&O (100/91-ton cars) railroads by PSCC and SSCC.  Their clasp brake 100-ton trucks remind me of  those blt by Buckeye Steel Casting in 1923 for the single PSCX-91 gondola car blt during the C&O run.



Al Kresse


----- Original Message -----
From: "donstrack" <donstrack@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, November 26, 2010 9:08:30 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Specialized Ore Cars and the Value of Captions



In a previous message thread, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:

Captions have to tell you something more than what you can already see in the picture.  "Here we see an SD-45 in full roar as it crosses the Delaware River on the Mill Rift bridge."  Gee, even that caption has facts in it that MIGHT not be evident to a casual reader, but any ERIE/EL fan will know all that already.  But captions that include year, month, date if possible, direction of the photo, locomotive or other equipment ID, location, reason you should look at the photo, etc., etc. are all reasons to buy a book. <<
Although not freight car related, I'm in the middle of a project to caption over 200 photos of "Bingham Canyon Railroads", each with no less than 50 words and no more than 70 words. It is proving to be a real test of my knowledge of the subject, and my ability to write about it.

Would anyone care to comment on the features of these heavy duty ore cars, such as truck design, air brakes, etc.

http://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Utah-Copper-Ore-Cars/

Don Strack



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


ottokroutil
 

Don, nice find.
Am I correct to assume these cars would only have been found in captive service between Kennecott mines and the smelter?
Regards, Otto


Don Strack
 

Yes. They were only used in the Bingham Canyon mine, and along the Bingham &
Garfield in the steam era (1911-1948), and the Copperton Line in the
electric era (1948-1978) and the SD40-2 and GP39-2 diesel era (1978-2001).
But they were built to AAR standards since B&G was technically a common
carrier. Prior to 1911 when the B&G was completed as a Utah Copper
subsidiary, all ore was moved by way of the RGW/D&RG which in 1905 purchased
control of the Shay-powered Copper Belt Railway. When the Copper Belt went
into operation in 1901 the road used steel gondolas, which were nicknamed
"battleships." There are distant photos from the 1903 era showing a Shay
gingerly bringing its limit of three "battleships" down to the RGW
connection at Bingham.

Don Strack

On Sat, Nov 27, 2010 at 9:32 AM, <otask@...> wrote:

Don, nice find.

Am I correct to assume these cars would only have been found in captive
service between Kennecott mines and the smelter?
Regards, Otto


Rod Miller
 

On 11/27/10 9:38 AM, Don Strack wrote:
Yes. They were only used in the Bingham Canyon mine, and along the Bingham&
Garfield in the steam era (1911-1948), and the Copperton Line in the
electric era (1948-1978) and the SD40-2 and GP39-2 diesel era (1978-2001).
But they were built to AAR standards since B&G was technically a common
carrier. Prior to 1911 when the B&G was completed as a Utah Copper
subsidiary, all ore was moved by way of the RGW/D&RG which in 1905 purchased
control of the Shay-powered Copper Belt Railway. When the Copper Belt went
into operation in 1901 the road used steel gondolas, which were nicknamed
"battleships." There are distant photos from the 1903 era showing a Shay
gingerly bringing its limit of three "battleships" down to the RGW
connection at Bingham.

Don Strack

On Sat, Nov 27, 2010 at 9:32 AM,<otask@...> wrote:

Don, nice find.

Am I correct to assume these cars would only have been found in captive
service between Kennecott mines and the smelter?
Regards, Otto
Don, do you have any information on the ore cars used by
Kennecott in Nevada before they dieselized? I recall a
box on a platform, some with outside ribs and some with
smooth sides. Sometime after I left Ely in the mid-50's
those cars were replaced by the cars that you see there
today.

Thanks

Rod


--
---
Rod Miller, Chairman
O Scale West / S West
2011 Meet is Jan 27-29
http://www.oscalewest.com/osw2011.shtml


Don Strack
 

No. Sorry.



Don Strack



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Rod
Miller
Sent: Saturday, November 27, 2010 12:44 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Specialized Ore Cars and the Value of Captions

Don, do you have any information on the ore cars used by
Kennecott in Nevada before they dieselized? I recall a
box on a platform, some with outside ribs and some with
smooth sides. Sometime after I left Ely in the mid-50's
those cars were replaced by the cars that you see there
today.

Thanks

Rod