Hooks under UP S-40-10


Jim Hayes
 

One of Don Strack's UP photos is of an S-40-10 stockcar. It has several
hooks under the side sill. What are they for?

http://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/UP-Freight-Cars/12573244_k2YDv#902616546_Y2DuX-X2-LB

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon
www.sunshinekits.com


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Nov 28, 2010, at 4:39 PM, Jim Hayes wrote:

One of Don Strack's UP photos is of an S-40-10 stockcar. It has
several
hooks under the side sill. What are they for?
Jim, they were for coolant tanks to drip cold water on hot journals -
a primitive but, apparently fairly effective way to deal with hot
boxes. Many SP and PFE cars also had them in the 1920s and '30s,
though they're in shadow and often difficult to see in photos.

Richard Hendrickson


Jim Hayes
 

Thanks, Richard


Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon
www.sunshinekits.com


On Sun, Nov 28, 2010 at 5:14 PM, Richard Hendrickson <
rhendrickson@...> wrote:



On Nov 28, 2010, at 4:39 PM, Jim Hayes wrote:

One of Don Strack's UP photos is of an S-40-10 stockcar. It has
several
hooks under the side sill. What are they for?
Jim, they were for coolant tanks to drip cold water on hot journals -
a primitive but, apparently fairly effective way to deal with hot
boxes. Many SP and PFE cars also had them in the 1920s and '30s,
though they're in shadow and often difficult to see in photos.

Richard Hendrickson

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Greg Martin
 

Jim,

I remember a conversation with Richard Hendrickson about this photo as he
had a copy as well and we never could figure out why they were there.

Greg Martin

In a message dated 11/28/2010 4:39:48 P.M. Pacific Standard Time,
jimhayes97225@... writes:




One of Don Strack's UP photos is of an S-40-10 stockcar. It has several
hooks under the side sill. What are they for?

_http://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/UP-Freight-Cars/12573244_k2YDv#90261
6546_Y2DuX-X2-LB_
(http://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/UP-Freight-Cars/12573244_k2YDv#902616546_Y2DuX-X2-LB)

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon
www.sunshinekits.com

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Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Richard Hendrickson wrote:
Jim, they were for coolant tanks to drip cold water on hot journals - a primitive but, apparently fairly effective way to deal with hot boxes. Many SP and PFE cars also had them in the 1920s and '30s, though they're in shadow and often difficult to see in photos.
Officially on the SP these were "journal box coolers," but crews universally called them "Keeley cans." They can be found in photos of steam locomotive tenders on the SP too. I have a bunch of photos of cabooses with them in my Vol. 2 on SP cabooses, and an SP drawing for them on p. 157 of that book.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

Here is what a YV brakeman told me many years ago about Keeley's:

"The YV had friction bearings in all of the cars and when you'd have a hot
box or one that is warming up, that'd hang what you'd call a Keeley. This
was a tank with water in it and it had a hose and you'd just open the
journal box lid and fasten the hose in there and it would just kinda drip in
there and keep that sucker cool enough so that you could get to some place
to set it out or take it into Merced Falls that way. I just figured that the
Keeley was made by the Keeley Company some place. After the War [WW2] I had
to go and take a physical after I was discharged. They sent me to Pontiac,
Illinois. I went in there, by gosh, it was the Keeley Institute. I wondered,
what in the hell is this? It turned out that the Keeley was a "drop"
rehabilitation deal back in the early days! The cure was a water cure and so
I think that this tank got the name Keeley because that was the popular way
to cure somebody. I don't think that it was made by the Keeley Company at
all. I think that that was just a clever name they hung on it.

"It looked like one of these tanks that you carry air in for airing up tires
remote from the pump. It was hung right off of a grab iron and I suppose
that it was 2'-3' long and 10" in diameter and it had this rubber hose on
it. You'd just hang that thing in there and keep things cool.

"I remember one time they burned a journal so bad that we had to change the
wheels. That is hard to do with a car load of logs. With arch bar trucks
it's not too bad, you can just drop the bolts and pull the journal boxes and
the whole works out. With a car with cast trucks, you can't do that out in
the field, you'd have to go out with a wrecker and put a new truck on it.
Things were always done in a most expeditious manner on the YV. The YV had
all kinds of clever ways to do things."

I've often thought that modeling a car with a Keeley on it would be a nice
detail.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Jack Burgess quoted:
"The YV had friction bearings in all of the cars and when you'd have a hot box or one that is warming up, that'd hang what you'd call a Keeley . . . I just figured that the Keeley was made by the Keeley Company some place. After the War [WW2] I had
to go and take a physical after I was discharged. They sent me to Pontiac, Illinois. I went in there, by gosh, it was the Keeley Institute . . . the Keeley was a water cure . . ."
Famous early in the 20th century as a "cure" for alcoholism, the Keeley Cure involved injections of gold chloride (which is not known to have health effects) and consumption of a "tonic," reputedly containing a certain amount of alcohol. Formulas used at the Keeley Institute were secret, leading to medical skepticism. But some successes were had at Keeley, partly due to treating patients as persons who could recover, not as incurable or sinful people. Vaudeville routines and other kinds of humor in the first decades of the 1900s contained jokes about "taking the Keeley Cure," so I'm sure that's the source of the nickname for the journal box cooler.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Dennis Williams
 

Jim.
  Most interesting are the trucks, leaf, coil. Must have stolen them from the Standard Railway!!
  Dennis

--- On Sun, 11/28/10, Jim Hayes <jimhayes97225@...> wrote:


From: Jim Hayes <jimhayes97225@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Hooks under UP S-40-10
To: "Stm Frt Cars" <STMFC@...>
Date: Sunday, November 28, 2010, 4:39 PM


 



One of Don Strack's UP photos is of an S-40-10 stockcar. It has several
hooks under the side sill. What are they for?

http://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/UP-Freight-Cars/12573244_k2YDv#902616546_Y2DuX-X2-LB

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon
www.sunshinekits.com

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spsalso
 

I have also heard the term "Keeley" from a former SP&S employee. I wonder how widespread the term was.


Ed

Edward Sutorik