axle hung micro motor in HO


Bruce Smith
 

Folks,

Begging Mike's pardon, as this is really peripherally related to steam
era freight cars... but I need to post here to reach those who of you at
Prototype Rails asked for more information about the axle mounted
micromotor I had there that is destined to power my HO Tichy 120 ton
derrick. The motor and gears are from E-Flite (or Blade) and are item #
EFLH1066, replacement servo unit. A simple Google search with
"EFLH1066" will get you to the product right away. I mounted this on a
Reboxx 1.044 long axle with 0.088 treads in a Bowser 70 ton Andrews
truck (ie. their PRR "Crown" truck).

In addition, there are photos of the process of mounting the motor in
the "wreck derricks" folder of the PRRPro group on Yehaw (and yes, you
have to join to see them).

Finally, I have video of the truck moving on my test track, connected to
a small wafer battery.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aWLJ9WYFcuA&feature=BF&list=ULgXL96Jj2hhs&index=1
I hope to connect it directly to track power and even DCC eventually.

Before any of you credit me with genius (or insanity), I want to give Ed
Walters credit for the idea. He got me started with references to
english modelers doing this sort of thing -
http://www.clag.org.uk/axle-hung.html

Those of you interested in more details, please lets take this
discussion off STMFC!

Regards
Bruce

Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL (war iggle! go tiggers!)


Tim O'Connor
 

Bruce

Recently I brought up the Brownhoist cranes on another list, and
was told that I was mistaken to think the steam-powered cranes were
self-propelled. I was told only dieselized (rebuilt) cranes were
capable. Not so? I Googled for Brownhoist catalogs (easily found)
and also looked them up in "Railroad History" but could not find
any definite answers about self-propulsion.

A crane ain't a caboose, or a passenger car, or a loco -- so it
must be a freight car! :-)

Tim O'Connor

Begging Mike's pardon, as this is really peripherally related to steam
era freight cars... but I need to post here to reach those who of you at
Prototype Rails asked for more information about the axle mounted
micromotor I had there that is destined to power my HO Tichy 120 ton
derrick. The motor and gears are from E-Flite (or Blade) and are item #
EFLH1066, replacement servo unit. A simple Google search with
"EFLH1066" will get you to the product right away. I mounted this on a
Reboxx 1.044 long axle with 0.088 treads in a Bowser 70 ton Andrews
truck (ie. their PRR "Crown" truck).

In addition, there are photos of the process of mounting the motor in
the "wreck derricks" folder of the PRRPro group on Yehaw (and yes, you
have to join to see them).

Finally, I have video of the truck moving on my test track, connected to
a small wafer battery.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aWLJ9WYFcuA&feature=BF&list=ULgXL96Jj2hhs&index=1
I hope to connect it directly to track power and even DCC eventually.

Before any of you credit me with genius (or insanity), I want to give Ed
Walters credit for the idea. He got me started with references to
english modelers doing this sort of thing -
http://www.clag.org.uk/axle-hung.html

Those of you interested in more details, please lets take this
discussion off STMFC!

Regards
Bruce


Robert Tomb
 

Tim and Group,

I have several manufacturer's manuals for cranes built in the early 1900's, in both 4-wheel and 8-wheel versions that show self-propelling gears and clutches on even the smallest sizes were common. They tended to be geared for low speed, and could even pull a couple of freight cars.

Robert Tomb
Spring, TX

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Bruce

Recently I brought up the Brownhoist cranes on another list, and
was told that I was mistaken to think the steam-powered cranes were
self-propelled. I was told only dieselized (rebuilt) cranes were
capable. Not so? I Googled for Brownhoist catalogs (easily found)
and also looked them up in "Railroad History" but could not find
any definite answers about self-propulsion.

A crane ain't a caboose, or a passenger car, or a loco -- so it
must be a freight car! :-)

Tim O'Connor


Begging Mike's pardon, as this is really peripherally related to steam
era freight cars... but I need to post here to reach those who of you at
Prototype Rails asked for more information about the axle mounted
micromotor I had there that is destined to power my HO Tichy 120 ton
derrick. The motor and gears are from E-Flite (or Blade) and are item #
EFLH1066, replacement servo unit. A simple Google search with
"EFLH1066" will get you to the product right away. I mounted this on a
Reboxx 1.044 long axle with 0.088 treads in a Bowser 70 ton Andrews
truck (ie. their PRR "Crown" truck).

In addition, there are photos of the process of mounting the motor in
the "wreck derricks" folder of the PRRPro group on Yehaw (and yes, you
have to join to see them).

Finally, I have video of the truck moving on my test track, connected to
a small wafer battery.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aWLJ9WYFcuA&feature=BF&list=ULgXL96Jj2hhs&index=1
I hope to connect it directly to track power and even DCC eventually.

Before any of you credit me with genius (or insanity), I want to give Ed
Walters credit for the idea. He got me started with references to
english modelers doing this sort of thing -
http://www.clag.org.uk/axle-hung.html

Those of you interested in more details, please lets take this
discussion off STMFC!

Regards
Bruce


bob_karig <karig@...>
 

Seems like an appropriate topic to me.

I can't wait to see the video of the self propelled derrick. I suspect that E-Flite is going to have a run on its servo motors that it can't explain. Bruce should demand royalties.

Bob Karig


Bruce Smith
 

Tim,

While many small cranes were not self propelled, most cranes above 50-70
ton capacity were, and were so long before they were diseaselized.
These were driven through gears on one axle of one truck, with top
speeds around 10-20 mph. The gears could be disengaged when hauled to
the wreck site by a steam loco (note speed limits were usually around 30
mph boom back, 15-20 mph boom forward). The derricks (PRR for larger
cranes) were then maneuvered around the wreck site under their own
power. I even contemplated a sound chip in mine... with rapid cylinder
exhausts like a shay. A person (sorry - I forget who!) with 1st hand
experience with one said the chuffs should be "soft".

My photos of the Washintong Terminal derrick at the B&O museum clearly
show the gears as do photos of the W120 derrick at Strasburg. Other
steam powered MOW equipment such as pile drivers had similar
arrangements (I have photos of the W of A steam pile driver at the
Southeastern Railway Museum that clearly show the gear drive).

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

"Tim O'Connor" <timboconnor@...> 01/10/11 1:32 AM >>>
Bruce

Recently I brought up the Brownhoist cranes on another list, and
was told that I was mistaken to think the steam-powered cranes were
self-propelled. I was told only dieselized (rebuilt) cranes were
capable. Not so? I Googled for Brownhoist catalogs (easily found)
and also looked them up in "Railroad History" but could not find
any definite answers about self-propulsion.

A crane ain't a caboose, or a passenger car, or a loco -- so it
must be a freight car! :-)

Tim O'Connor


Frank Greene
 

Tim, I think you suspect the response you got was bovinus manurem, and you would be right. A Southern Railway "List and Description of Derricks" (not the best copy, may be dated 1945) shows that most of them, including Bucyrus and Industrial Works derricks, were self-propelled. <http://southernmodeler.info/SRrollingstock/SR_DERRICK_DGMS_1967.pdf>

On 1/10/2011 1:31 AM, Tim O'Connor wrote:
Bruce

Recently I brought up the Brownhoist cranes on another list, and
was told that I was mistaken to think the steam-powered cranes were
self-propelled. I was told only dieselized (rebuilt) cranes were
capable. Not so? I Googled for Brownhoist catalogs (easily found)
and also looked them up in "Railroad History" but could not find
any definite answers about self-propulsion.

A crane ain't a caboose, or a passenger car, or a loco -- so it
must be a freight car! :-)

Tim O'Connor
--

Frank Greene
Memphis, TN


John C. La Rue, Jr. <MOFWCABOOSE@...>
 

Self-propelled cranes ("locomotive cranes") go all the way back to 1859, when the first one was built in England. First US-built locomotive crane was built by Weston Crane Company, a subsidiary of Yale & Towne, in about 1884, but they were rare until the late 1890s, when sales took off, propelled mainly by private industry. Many thousand have been built since.

Self-propelled wreckers began about 1892, first built by Industrial Works. As Frank points out, not all wreckers were self-propelled, but the majority were. They did not develop enough tractive effort to move more then a couple of cars, and in practice self-propulsion was usually used to position the wrecker for minor work. The propelling mechanism was not that robust, and there are cases on record of a wrecker "stripping its gears" and running away on a grade.

With locomotive cranes, which were much lighter, the propelling mechanism had to be robust, as being able to move about and switch cars into position, without the services of a locomotive, was fundamental to the crane's success.

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL

-----Original Message-----
From: Frank Greene <frgreene290@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Mon, Jan 10, 2011 11:06 am
Subject: Re: [STMFC] axle hung micro motor in HO





Tim, I think you suspect the response you got was bovinus manurem, and
you would be right. A Southern Railway "List and Description of
Derricks" (not the best copy, may be dated 1945) shows that most of
them, including Bucyrus and Industrial Works derricks, were
self-propelled.
<http://southernmodeler.info/SRrollingstock/SR_DERRICK_DGMS_1967.pdf>

On 1/10/2011 1:31 AM, Tim O'Connor wrote:
Bruce

Recently I brought up the Brownhoist cranes on another list, and
was told that I was mistaken to think the steam-powered cranes were
self-propelled. I was told only dieselized (rebuilt) cranes were
capable. Not so? I Googled for Brownhoist catalogs (easily found)
and also looked them up in "Railroad History" but could not find
any definite answers about self-propulsion.

A crane ain't a caboose, or a passenger car, or a loco -- so it
must be a freight car! :-)

Tim O'Connor
--

Frank Greene
Memphis, TN









[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Jared Harper
 

Bruce,
Seeing the video I was surprised how noisy the little motor is.
Jared Harper
Athens, GA

--- In STMFC@..., "Bruce Smith" <smithbf@...> wrote:

Folks,

Begging Mike's pardon, as this is really peripherally related to steam
era freight cars... but I need to post here to reach those who of you at
Prototype Rails asked for more information about the axle mounted
micromotor I had there that is destined to power my HO Tichy 120 ton
derrick. The motor and gears are from E-Flite (or Blade) and are item #
EFLH1066, replacement servo unit. A simple Google search with
"EFLH1066" will get you to the product right away. I mounted this on a
Reboxx 1.044 long axle with 0.088 treads in a Bowser 70 ton Andrews
truck (ie. their PRR "Crown" truck).

In addition, there are photos of the process of mounting the motor in
the "wreck derricks" folder of the PRRPro group on Yehaw (and yes, you
have to join to see them).

Finally, I have video of the truck moving on my test track, connected to
a small wafer battery.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aWLJ9WYFcuA&feature=BF&list=ULgXL96Jj2hhs&index=1
I hope to connect it directly to track power and even DCC eventually.

Before any of you credit me with genius (or insanity), I want to give Ed
Walters credit for the idea. He got me started with references to
english modelers doing this sort of thing -
http://www.clag.org.uk/axle-hung.html

Those of you interested in more details, please lets take this
discussion off STMFC!

Regards
Bruce

Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL (war iggle! go tiggers!)