SLSF 146186


Tim O'Connor
 

Thanks, Charlie, for the photos link! :-)

http://thelibrary.springfield.missouri.org/lochist/frisco/friscoline/images/photos/p01670.jpg

What is the "thing" to the left of the bolster, under the sill?

Also, there is something very peculiar about the roof on this
car -- Notice how there is a very slight 'overhang' where the end
and roof meet. I've never seen that before on any 1937 AAR box car.

Tim O'Connor


Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

My "educated" guess is that "that thing" to the left of the truck is a box for holding defect cards.

The 1937 AAR car design allowed the use of many different makers' rooves, doors, and ends. Canadian roads used National Steel Car "waffle" ends on some of their "AAR 1937 design" cars, for example. So, I'm not surprised that this small roof panel overhang was found on an otherwise "standard" 1937 car. Perhaps knowing who the suppliers were of parts to the builder of this particular car would be of use in explaining why this occurred?

And it looks like a steel running board is fitted to this car, too.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Thanks, Charlie, for the photos link! :-)

http://thelibrary.springfield.missouri.org/lochist/frisco/friscoline/images/photos/p01670.jpg

What is the "thing" to the left of the bolster, under the sill?

Also, there is something very peculiar about the roof on this
car -- Notice how there is a very slight 'overhang' where the end
and roof meet. I've never seen that before on any 1937 AAR box car.

Tim O'Connor


Schuyler Larrabee
 

Actually, it looks sort of like the corners of the ends and sides are
flanged, like the sides are long enough to run past the plane of the end,
much like the roof does. Is that correct? You can't see the far corner
because of the ladder's stile.

SGL



Thanks, Charlie, for the photos link! :-)

http://thelibrary.springfield.missouri.org/lochist/frisco/friscoline/images/
photos/p01670.jpg

What is the "thing" to the left of the bolster, under the sill?

Also, there is something very peculiar about the roof on this
car -- Notice how there is a very slight 'overhang' where the end
and roof meet. I've never seen that before on any 1937 AAR box car.

Tim O'Connor








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pge253 <gregkennelly@...>
 

The two previous photos on the listed site, p01668 and p01669, show what looks like a normal junction between roof, end and sides on the same car.

Greg Kennelly
Burnaby, BC

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Schuyler Larrabee" <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:

Actually, it looks sort of like the corners of the ends and sides are
flanged, like the sides are long enough to run past the plane of the end,
much like the roof does. Is that correct? You can't see the far corner
because of the ladder's stile.

SGL



Thanks, Charlie, for the photos link! :-)

http://thelibrary.springfield.missouri.org/lochist/frisco/friscoline/images/
photos/p01670.jpg

- snip -


Tim O'Connor
 

The two previous photos on the listed site, p01668 and p01669, show what looks like a normal junction between roof, end and sides on the same car.

Greg Kennelly
Burnaby, BC

--- Schuyler Larrabee wrote:

Actually, it looks sort of like the corners of the ends and sides are
flanged, like the sides are long enough to run past the plane of the end,
much like the roof does. Is that correct? You can't see the far corner
because of the ladder's stile.

SGL


David
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Schuyler Larrabee" <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:

Actually, it looks sort of like the corners of the ends and sides are
flanged, like the sides are long enough to run past the plane of the end,
much like the roof does. Is that correct? You can't see the far corner
because of the ladder's stile.
Naah, it's a visual trick resulting from the really high contrast level in that photo. If the end actually was recessed, the rounded ends of the darts would be hidden by the vertical rivet strip on the corner.

David Thompson


Schuyler Larrabee
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "Schuyler
Larrabee" <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:

Actually, it looks sort of like the corners of the ends and sides are
flanged, like the sides are long enough to run past the plane of the end,
much like the roof does. Is that correct? You can't see the far corner
because of the ladder's stile.
Naah, it's a visual trick resulting from the really high contrast level in
that photo. If the end actually was recessed, the rounded ends of the darts
would be hidden by the vertical rivet strip on the corner.

David Thompson

David, look at it more closely, blow it up if you have the most recent IE,
in the lower right corner you can select the percentage of the view,
enlarging it up to 400% of original size. If you do that, you can see that
the rounded ends of the darts are far too close to the vertical rivet strip
to be credibly on a flat plane that hits the outboard edge of that rivet
strip.

As Tim O'C noted, the two ends are not built the same way.

SGL


http://thelibrary.springfield.missouri.org/lochist/frisco/friscoline/images/
photos/p01669.jpg
http://thelibrary.springfield.missouri.org/lochist/frisco/friscoline/images/
photos/p01670.jpg





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Tim O'Connor
 

David

I suppose it's possible, if whoever scanned the photo "oversharpened" it,
they may have distorted the image by overemphasis on the contrast where the
end and roof join. Still, absent any other information, I'll just not make
up my mind yet one way or the other.

Tim O'Connor

Naah, it's a visual trick resulting from the really high contrast level in that photo. If the end actually was recessed, the rounded ends of the darts would be hidden by the vertical rivet strip on the corner.
David Thompson


Gene <bierglaeser@...>
 

C'mon. David is correct. The sun is nearly straight overhead and is therefore castings unusually long shadows under the thin overlap of roof on end.

Gene Green