Model Analysis and Evolution


golden1014
 

Gentlemen,

I had a little spare time tonight so I paged through a list of freight car
models that I made ten years ago.  I'm a compulsive list-maker so it was
enjoyable to look through it, but as I did made some interesting observations
about where I've come int he hobby.  I wonder if you have had the same
evolution?

Exactly ten years ago I had 153 freight car models.  Of that total, 98 were what
I considered "unfinished".  Of that total of 153, I only have 38 of those models
today--that's a little less than 25%.  Of those 38 models, I have completely
rebuilt and/or repainted 16 of them--almost half--and have plans to
rebuild/repaint two more this year. 


I don't know the total number of models I have today as I'm rebuilding my
current list, but it is in the 150 range, and about 20 of those
are "unfinished".  That's only 13%.  Compare that to 67% unfinished ten years
ago.  Apparently my philosophy of buying and completing models on hand has also
evolved.

And another thing.  Ten years ago I didn't worry too much if I was using the
correct model for a given prototype, and I didn't install brake gear, or correct
trucks, or uncoupling devices, or other things that today I consider
the fundamentals.  I didn't concern myself with getting the car color right.

The reason for this rapid turnover is pretty obvious: it's you folks.  Your
generosity has helped me get from modeling trains to modeling freight cars, and
now I'm trying to do everything right--or, honestly--better.  Al Buchan was the
first guy that ever told me I was doing things wrong, and he did it in a very
mature way that changed my thinking on the spot.  I had a very
carefully-constructed Sunshine car, but the paint and decals and everything were
all wrong, and he politely pointed it out.  Around 1999 I joined this list, and
I was later strongly influenced by Ted's freight car series in RMC. 


My participation at RPM meets began in 2001 and that helped too.  Have I ever
told you the story when Jack Spencer read the dimensional data on one of my
kitbashed SAL box cars and laughed?  It was way wrong and yeah, it hurt--but I
thank him for it today.  Jack's a friend and I've learned a lot from him over
the years.

I know this message kinda sounds like it's about me, but it's not.  I thought
you might be interested to read some stats on the evolution of a fellow modeler,
and that you have been the driving force behind that evolution.  It leaves me
wondering how we'll evolve ten years from now.

John
 John Golden
O'Fallon, IL


Ned Carey <nedspam@...>
 

John Golden Wrote:
The reason for this rapid turnover is pretty obvious: it's you folks. Your
generosity has helped me get from modeling trains to modeling freight cars, and
now I'm trying to do everything right--or, honestly--better.

I agree and would also like to thank this list for its generosity. It has helped me be a much better modeler.

Ned Carey
PS: I avoid "me too" comments but I felt this was important enough to repeat.


Clark Propst
 

John,
Building and operating a prototype layout has made me into a much more disciplined buyer. Seems most cars I've bought on impulse are now gone or I'm thinking about selling.
My fleet stands at 138 operating models and 5 unbuild kits.

I still have my weak moments. Last summer I bought an IM ATSF WE box car RTR at the National Train Show because it was cheap. I then spent time repainting parts, adding decals, changing some appliances and still the base car of the car is wrong!
Last Naperville I bought one of those Sunshine multi-door D&RGW box cars because it was cool looking. Only to find in my documentation I should have bought the 6' door car…I guess I'll build it anyway…

Thanks for sharing your thoughts John : ))
Clark Propst