Consumer-grade 3D printers hit the mainstream


Tim O'Connor
 


John Kellett
 

Here is a link to Shapeways.  http://www.shapeways.com/

To see what is in the model train arena, use the menu on the left side of the
screen.  Mouse over "Hobby" to gain access to the "Model Train" category.  I am
sure you will be surprised at the detailed work.  Shapeways is now experimenting
with a new material "Frosted Ultra Detail" (FUD).  If you watch the rotating
header, there is a bulldozer and a MOW truck, both are Z scale (1:220).  With
the new FUD material, Z scale can be designed now down to the three foot
details.  Shapeways has other materials including metal, and now ceramics.

One more item, these prices are not that bad.

John Kellett




________________________________
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
To: stmfc@...
Sent: Fri, May 13, 2011 1:22:36 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Consumer-grade 3D printers hit the mainstream

 
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/14/arts/design/makerbot-is-a-new-3-d-printer.html




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Michael Aufderheide
 

John,
 
If I understand the site correctly, one can send 3-D models to them and have them made!  Wow!  A game changer? Where's my Sketch-up!
 
Regards,
 
Mike Aufderheide

From: John Kellett <soccrdad525@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, May 13, 2011 12:47 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Consumer-grade 3D printers hit the mainstream


 
Here is a link to Shapeways.  http://www.shapeways.com/

To see what is in the model train arena, use the menu on the left side of the
screen.  Mouse over "Hobby" to gain access to the "Model Train" category.  I am
sure you will be surprised at the detailed work.  Shapeways is now experimenting
with a new material "Frosted Ultra Detail" (FUD).  If you watch the rotating
header, there is a bulldozer and a MOW truck, both are Z scale (1:220).  With
the new FUD material, Z scale can be designed now down to the three foot
details.  Shapeways has other materials including metal, and now ceramics.

One more item, these prices are not that bad.

John Kellett

________________________________
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
To: stmfc@...
Sent: Fri, May 13, 2011 1:22:36 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Consumer-grade 3D printers hit the mainstream

 
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/14/arts/design/makerbot-is-a-new-3-d-printer.html

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


John Kellett
 

Hi Mike,

Yes design your own 3-D models, upload, then they verify, and you can have them
printed.  Shapeways does have instructions for the process to guard against
'open' models.  Key word 'open' meaning that edges do not align to form a solid
model.

The pricing that you see includes the shipping cost.  Shapeways minimum order is
$25.00 from any of the listed products.  And from order, production, to delivery
is usually 10 to 14 days.

The one shop I have ordered from is 'Stonysmith'.  Stony's models are mostly Z
scale, but with some recalculations you can see that they can be re-scaled.  Oh,
and all shop owners can set their own margin for their models.

John Kellett




________________________________
From: Mike Aufderheide <mononinmonon@...>
To: "STMFC@..." <STMFC@...>
Sent: Fri, May 13, 2011 2:09:10 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Consumer-grade 3D printers hit the mainstream

 
John,
 
If I understand the site correctly, one can send 3-D models to them and have
them made!  Wow!  A game changer? Where's my Sketch-up!
 
Regards,
 
Mike Aufderheide

From: John Kellett <soccrdad525@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, May 13, 2011 12:47 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Consumer-grade 3D printers hit the mainstream

 
Here is a link to Shapeways.  http://www.shapeways.com/

To see what is in the model train arena, use the menu on the left side of the
screen.  Mouse over "Hobby" to gain access to the "Model Train" category.  I am
sure you will be surprised at the detailed work.  Shapeways is now experimenting

with a new material "Frosted Ultra Detail" (FUD).  If you watch the rotating
header, there is a bulldozer and a MOW truck, both are Z scale (1:220).  With
the new FUD material, Z scale can be designed now down to the three foot
details.  Shapeways has other materials including metal, and now ceramics.

One more item, these prices are not that bad.

John Kellett

________________________________
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
To: stmfc@...
Sent: Fri, May 13, 2011 1:22:36 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Consumer-grade 3D printers hit the mainstream

 
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/14/arts/design/makerbot-is-a-new-3-d-printer.html








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Robert kirkham
 

So far I have made reefer doors, fowler boxcar floors/underframes and a CPR reefer model in HO scale using Sketchup drawings and the Shapeways printing service.

My efforts are those of an amateur but, FWIW, in my opinion the fowler boxcar underframe is usable, but only because it will be under the car and mostly in the dark. I designed it without flanges on the bolsters or frame components - those will be added with styrene strip, That approach was taken as the material Shapeways offered would not produce a thin edged flange. From what I have read about the new material, it sounds like it would work.

The other parts I've had printed are not useable without a lot of additional work. I see a few problems:
- V groove siding on reefers: I was dumb enough to try scale lumber dimensions - it produced grooves so subtle they are less obvious than the grain of the material made while the part is printed. The problem arises as much from the printing process as from my use of fine dimensions - groove tend to fill up with material unless the gap is wider. On my second try, I enlarged the grooves about 50% That effort made little practical difference. Another 50% or 100% increase would be a better bet, and I will be giving it a try in due course.
- surface texture - is either grainy or granular depending on the materials I've used (white detail and strong flexible). I am looking forward to testing the ultra detail frosted stuff when $$$ allow another experiment. For now, to make the reefer acceptable I would have to scribe the grooves deeper and sand the board faces smoother - not something I relish.
- stair stepping on the sloped roof panels - requires sanding.
- minimum wall thickness - was .7mm, which is tolerable for a lot of things we do in HO but course for some. The new frosted detailed materials will work with a considerably thinner cross section. Again, I need to experiment.
- fit - I created small index features at the corners of the car sides. As a result, the parts fit together in perfect alignment. That is my favourite part of the process so far.
- floor/fishbelly underframe: I guess the floor was not made thick enough, as the whole part came out with a curve, bowing up in the centre, and down toward the car ends. It is flexible enough to straighten, and so I suppose could be made to work. But if making the part a half millimeter thicker will make it more straight and stiff, it will be worth the extra dollars.

The reefer - 2 sides, so ends, roof, floor/underframe - cost about $85 to print and have delivered. Not a good price for a lot of models, but if I was pleased with it, it would serve as a ready and replaceable basis for resin copies.

Someone mentioned using them for doors and ends or other parts. I am currently working on a Murphy-style inverted corrugation end for a CPR composite automobile and will see how that works. Like so many things, the drawing is as much a challenge for an amateur as anything else. For example, I seem to be unable to get Google Sketchup to render an HO scale rivet head. My thinking is to add them after the fact with Archer rivets, but that is going to get old in time. Another example - just how precisely to model the corrugations - what will show up in the printed version, and what will be lost. At this point, I'm using a fairly simplified profile as Google Sketchup seems to have problems with the very small faces that would be required with compound HO curves.

Rob Kirkham

Hoping this technology is improved and tweaked to meet our needs.

--------------------------------------------------
From: "John Kellett" <soccrdad525@...>
Sent: Friday, May 13, 2011 11:22 AM
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Consumer-grade 3D printers hit the mainstream

Hi Mike,

Yes design your own 3-D models, upload, then they verify, and you can have them
printed. Shapeways does have instructions for the process to guard against
'open' models. Key word 'open' meaning that edges do not align to form a solid
model.

The pricing that you see includes the shipping cost. Shapeways minimum order is
$25.00 from any of the listed products. And from order, production, to delivery
is usually 10 to 14 days.

The one shop I have ordered from is 'Stonysmith'. Stony's models are mostly Z
scale, but with some recalculations you can see that they can be re-scaled. Oh,
and all shop owners can set their own margin for their models.

John Kellett




________________________________
From: Mike Aufderheide <mononinmonon@...>
To: "STMFC@..." <STMFC@...>
Sent: Fri, May 13, 2011 2:09:10 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Consumer-grade 3D printers hit the mainstream


John,

If I understand the site correctly, one can send 3-D models to them and have
them made! Wow! A game changer? Where's my Sketch-up!

Regards,

Mike Aufderheide

From: John Kellett <soccrdad525@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, May 13, 2011 12:47 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Consumer-grade 3D printers hit the mainstream


Here is a link to Shapeways. http://www.shapeways.com/

To see what is in the model train arena, use the menu on the left side of the
screen. Mouse over "Hobby" to gain access to the "Model Train" category. I am
sure you will be surprised at the detailed work. Shapeways is now experimenting

with a new material "Frosted Ultra Detail" (FUD). If you watch the rotating
header, there is a bulldozer and a MOW truck, both are Z scale (1:220). With
the new FUD material, Z scale can be designed now down to the three foot
details. Shapeways has other materials including metal, and now ceramics.

One more item, these prices are not that bad.

John Kellett

________________________________
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
To: stmfc@...
Sent: Fri, May 13, 2011 1:22:36 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Consumer-grade 3D printers hit the mainstream


http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/14/arts/design/makerbot-is-a-new-3-d-printer.html









------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




Chuck Soule
 

Thanks, Rob - this is just the kind of review I was hoping to see. It sounds to me like the current state of the art is not particularly good for fine modeling, but may be very suitable for such things as background models of prototype buildings that you want for creating the whole scene on your layout - at a cost trade off you must decide based on your own budget and modeling philosophy constraints.

Chuck Soule


Robert kirkham
 

I've a foreground station model in development as well, though I won't be using this process for most of it. It has certain details that are a crushing pain to do in styrene, with layers, cutouts etc - all to be done in straight accurate repeated patterns. I will design those parts with the need to sand the grainy surface smooth in mind and add them to the styrene and brass sheet used for other parts of the model. And the result (I expect) will be a better station model than I could do by hand work.

That is the same for my approach to freight car modeling - parts with flat surfaces that can be sanded smooth are ideal - assuming it makes more sense to rapid prototype them than actually build from styrene. likewise, parts where the grain would not look bad (thinking weathered wood here) are worth consideration. But before I would bother I would consider the cost and time spent to create the 3d model and have it printed versus just sitting with blades and styrene sheet.

That said, I am also using the Sketchup drawings as a way to figure out dimensions when I lack other information. I find it very helpful to be able to tilt a 3D model into the same angle as a photo and compare the shapes and proportions. And if something seems out of whack, I love that it is so much easier to alter (compared with pen and ink drawings!)

Rob

--------------------------------------------------
From: "timken2626" <timken2626@...>
Sent: Saturday, May 14, 2011 9:56 AM
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Consumer-grade 3D printers hit the mainstream

Thanks, Rob - this is just the kind of review I was hoping to see. It sounds to me like the current state of the art is not particularly good for fine modeling, but may be very suitable for such things as background models of prototype buildings that you want for creating the whole scene on your layout - at a cost trade off you must decide based on your own budget and modeling philosophy constraints.

Chuck Soule





------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




Brian <cornbeltroute@...>
 

. . . It sounds to me like the current state of the art is not particularly good for fine modeling. . . . -Chuck Soule <
I've been collecting 3D printing information as I trip across it. There are several processes out there, some of which do a very fine job of reproducing fine detail. Some years ago I was able to examine first hand an N scale GP38 shell from Mark4Design (New Zealand) and thought it to be a match for Kato N scale shells.

Recently, I have heard third hand that a fellow at TT Nut (a TT scale forum) used Shapeways to create a GP7 shell; it was not entirely successful, according to the judgment of that third party.

I am 3D modeling a first gen EMD loco in TT scale and will CNC cut the sub-assemblies here. But, certain items, such as air horns, I am hoping to 3D print. Hope some of the finer 3D printing technology is up to it.

-Brian Chapman
Evansdale, Iowa


Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

There will be two clinics on rapid prototyping at the X2011 West NMRA
Convention in July (see my previous post on the RPM meet). One will be
presented by Rene Gourley of Proto87 fame and he will talk about getting a
first model printed, the process for developing the design and obtaining the
model, and the finishing that was required.

The second will be by Bill Brisko of Pacific Locomotive Works
(www.pacificlocomotive.com) who does this commercially and has his own
printer.

Jack Burgess
Newark, CA


Brian <cornbeltroute@...>
 

There will be two clinics on rapid prototyping at the X2011 West NMRA Convention in July. . . . -Jack Burgess <
Jack,

For those of us with a keen interest in the subject but are unable to attend the convention, is there a way we can plug into the information presented, maybe in summary form? Is there a Web site that might present such information post-convention? Just hoping. . . .

Thanks much,

Brian Chapman
Evansdale, Iowa


Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

<Jack,
<
<For those of us with a keen interest in the subject but are unable to
<attend the convention, is there a way we can plug into the information
<presented, maybe in summary form? Is there a Web site that might present
<such information post-convention? Just hoping. . . .
<
<Thanks much,
<
<Brian Chapman
<Evansdale, Iowa

I'll see if Rene would be willing to share his clinic somehow...

Jack


Charles Harris
 

Hi

Living in New Zealand I would appreciate some information. Video or what ever. Happy to pay for something.


I would like to see what equipment available, accuracy .05mm or less stepping etc. Recommended design software etc.

Best way to design the curved front areas like F units etc. Something better that Sketchup but the same price ! Or something reasonably priced. Even a nose component that you can change easily the shapes.

I think someone in the industry needs to sell the components (component software) for GM doors, GE doors, Cabs, etc, etc. Horns, steps, walkways, etc. We can then do the basic design for our unique loco and add in the components.

Who do we send design to for quote on printing.

Thanks

Charlie Harris





Charlie Harris


From: Jack Burgess
Sent: Wednesday, May 18, 2011 5:07 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Consumer-grade 3D printers hit the mainstream



There will be two clinics on rapid prototyping at the X2011 West NMRA
Convention in July (see my previous post on the RPM meet). One will be
presented by Rene Gourley of Proto87 fame and he will talk about getting a
first model printed, the process for developing the design and obtaining the
model, and the finishing that was required.

The second will be by Bill Brisko of Pacific Locomotive Works
(www.pacificlocomotive.com) who does this commercially and has his own
printer.

Jack Burgess
Newark, CA


Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

Some of your questions can be answered through Bill Brisko's website...


Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


<Hi
<
<Living in New Zealand I would appreciate some information. Video or
<what ever. Happy to pay for something.
<
<
<I would like to see what equipment available, accuracy .05mm or less
<stepping etc. Recommended design software etc.
<
<Best way to design the curved front areas like F units etc. Something
<better that Sketchup but the same price ! Or something reasonably
<priced. Even a nose component that you can change easily the shapes.
<
<I think someone in the industry needs to sell the components (component
<software) for GM doors, GE doors, Cabs, etc, etc. Horns, steps,
<walkways, etc. We can then do the basic design for our unique loco
<and add in the components.
<
<Who do we send design to for quote on printing.
<
<Thanks
<
<Charlie Harris
<
<
<
<
<
<Charlie Harris
<
<
<From: Jack Burgess
<Sent: Wednesday, May 18, 2011 5:07 AM
<To: STMFC@...
<Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Consumer-grade 3D printers hit the mainstream
<
<
<
<There will be two clinics on rapid prototyping at the X2011 West NMRA
<Convention in July (see my previous post on the RPM meet). One will be
<presented by Rene Gourley of Proto87 fame and he will talk about getting
<a
<first model printed, the process for developing the design and obtaining
<the
<model, and the finishing that was required.
<
<The second will be by Bill Brisko of Pacific Locomotive Works
<(www.pacificlocomotive.com) who does this commercially and has his own
<printer.
<
<Jack Burgess
<Newark, CA
<
<
<
<
<
<
<
<
<
<
<
<------------------------------------
<
<Yahoo! Groups Links
<
<
<


Charles Harris
 

Hi Jack

Thanks for that. I should read more carefully.

Regards

Charlie


From: Jack Burgess
Sent: Wednesday, May 18, 2011 1:42 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Consumer-grade 3D printers hit the mainstream



Some of your questions can be answered through Bill Brisko's website...

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


<Hi
<
<Living in New Zealand I would appreciate some information. Video or
<what ever. Happy to pay for something.
<
<
<I would like to see what equipment available, accuracy .05mm or less
<stepping etc. Recommended design software etc.
<
<Best way to design the curved front areas like F units etc. Something
<better that Sketchup but the same price ! Or something reasonably
<priced. Even a nose component that you can change easily the shapes.
<
<I think someone in the industry needs to sell the components (component
<software) for GM doors, GE doors, Cabs, etc, etc. Horns, steps,
<walkways, etc. We can then do the basic design for our unique loco
<and add in the components.
<
<Who do we send design to for quote on printing.
<
<Thanks
<
<Charlie Harris
<
<
<
<
<
<Charlie Harris
<
<
<From: Jack Burgess
<Sent: Wednesday, May 18, 2011 5:07 AM
<To: STMFC@...
<Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Consumer-grade 3D printers hit the mainstream
<
<
<
<There will be two clinics on rapid prototyping at the X2011 West NMRA
<Convention in July (see my previous post on the RPM meet). One will be
<presented by Rene Gourley of Proto87 fame and he will talk about getting
<a
<first model printed, the process for developing the design and obtaining
<the
<model, and the finishing that was required.
<
<The second will be by Bill Brisko of Pacific Locomotive Works
<(www.pacificlocomotive.com) who does this commercially and has his own
<printer.
<
<Jack Burgess
<Newark, CA
<
<
<
<
<
<
<
<
<
<
<
<------------------------------------
<
<Yahoo! Groups Links
<
<
<