Wabash S/S Box Car Roadname Lettering Question


reporterllc
 

Am building an HO Speedswitch Media Wabash automobile boxcar. (By the way, this is wonderful kit, but I would have preferred the ladder stiles on the ends to be molded on. I have already broke one drilling it and am having a fun time getting the flash off the one I didn't break.)

To the point: I notice all the photos show the "WABASH" roadname lettering on the right side of the car. However, I recently came across a photo of one used in LCL service with the roadname lettering on the left side. Unfortunately, the photo does not show the car number. The door is opened to the right.

Did this have anything to do with which direction the door opened or could this be a single door car? Or is there some other variable? The photo was taken in the early 50s. Another interesting thing about the car is the "H" in Wabash sits higher than the rest of the lettering. Chet: If you read this, it is the car pictured in my "The Gary Local, The Last Mixed Train in Indiana" with Sam Fisher loading LCL. Folks, I can't post the photo here as it's from the Indiana Historical Society (Richard Simons photo) and the WRRHS had to pay some bucks to get it in the Banner.

Victor Baird
Fort Wayne, Indiana


Bruce Smith
 

Victor,

In general, with automobile cars (or any 40' double door car) with the right door centered on the car, opening the left door completely would obscure the reporting marks if they were on the left side, making it difficult for a clerk on the loading dock to identify the car. For this reason, many double door cars have their reporting marks on the right side rather than the left side of the car. Often, most of the rest of the lettering was swapped as well. A double door car with lettering in the "normal" position might indicate that the left door had been welded shut and could no longer be opened.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

On Jun 15, 2011, at 9:31 AM, wabash2813 wrote:

Am building an HO Speedswitch Media Wabash automobile boxcar. (By the way, this is wonderful kit, but I would have preferred the ladder stiles on the ends to be molded on. I have already broke one drilling it and am having a fun time getting the flash off the one I didn't break.)

To the point: I notice all the photos show the "WABASH" roadname lettering on the right side of the car. However, I recently came across a photo of one used in LCL service with the roadname lettering on the left side. Unfortunately, the photo does not show the car number. The door is opened to the right.

Did this have anything to do with which direction the door opened or could this be a single door car? Or is there some other variable? The photo was taken in the early 50s. Another interesting thing about the car is the "H" in Wabash sits higher than the rest of the lettering. Chet: If you read this, it is the car pictured in my "The Gary Local, The Last Mixed Train in Indiana" with Sam Fisher loading LCL. Folks, I can't post the photo here as it's from the Indiana Historical Society (Richard Simons photo) and the WRRHS had to pay some bucks to get it in the Banner.

Victor Baird
Fort Wayne, Indiana





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jerryglow2
 

Wouldn't an ORER show door opening of the "reduced" size?

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@..., Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:

.......... A double door
car with lettering in the "normal" position might indicate that the
left door had been welded shut and could no longer be opened.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Bruce Smith
 

Jerry,

Usually it would, if the entry had been changed by the railroad since the modification of the car. But that's a big IF and it didn't happen overnight <G>. And as has been noted on this list a number of times, the permanently closed door was often stenciled to the effect.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

On Jun 15, 2011, at 10:51 AM, jerryglow2 wrote:

Wouldn't an ORER show door opening of the "reduced" size?

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@..., Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:

.......... A double door
car with lettering in the "normal" position might indicate that the
left door had been welded shut and could no longer be opened.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Benjamin Hom
 

Jerry Glow asked:
"Wouldn't an ORER show door opening of the "reduced" size?"

Not necessarily.  I've seen these cars listed with the original opening listed
in the dimensional data, with a note indicating that the auxiliary door had been
sealed with a new door opening size of ________.


Ben Hom


rwitt_2000
 


Jerry Glow asked:
"Wouldn't an ORER show door opening of the "reduced" size?"
Ben Hom replied:
Not necessarily. I've seen these cars listed with the original
opening listed
in the dimensional data, with a note indicating that the auxiliary
door had been
sealed with a new door opening size of ________.
Yes, and often only a limited number of cars would be converted. Thus in
many entries the original series would list the original door opening
with a note indicating what car numbers had a different door opening.
The note could applied to multiple series so one needs to read the notes
in ORER to be sure you have modeled a given car number correctly.

Bob Witt


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Bruce Smith wrote:
In general, with automobile cars (or any 40' double door car) with the right door centered on the car, opening the left door completely would obscure the reporting marks if they were on the left side, making it difficult for a clerk on the loading dock to identify the car.
As Bruce implies but doesn't say, this is the case for double- door cars with staggered doors (the normal arrangement on automobile cars). By the 1950s, some railroads were beginning to build double- door cars with them centered on both sides, making a different situation regarding the reporting marks.
I'm sure the convenience of clerks was part of the reason for swapping lettering from the two ends of the car side, but given that the number was on the car ends, this seems to me like a minor gain.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


jerryglow2
 

I purposly bought a 2nd Westerfield MP door and a half car so I could include such lettering...

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@..., Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:

Jerry,

Usually it would, if the entry had been changed by the railroad since
the modification of the car. But that's a big IF and it didn't happen
overnight <G>. And as has been noted on this list a number of times,
the permanently closed door was often stenciled to the effect.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Clark Propst
 

I saw one of those on Mark fedderson's layout yeaterday...man, I'd like to have one. Maybe it's good thing Al called it quits?

Clark Propst

--- In STMFC@..., "jerryglow2" <jerryglow@...> wrote:

I purposly bought a 2nd Westerfield MP door and a half car so I could include such lettering...

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@..., Bruce Smith <smithbf@> wrote:

Jerry,


Clark Propst
 

--- In STMFC@..., "jerryglow2" <jerryglow@...> wrote:

I purposly bought a 2nd Westerfield MP door and a half car so I could include such lettering...

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@..., Bruce Smith <smithbf@> wrote:

Jerry,

Usually it would, if the entry had been changed by the railroad since
the modification of the car. But that's a big IF and it didn't happen
overnight <G>. And as has been noted on this list a number of times,
the permanently closed door was often stenciled to the effect.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Jerry Glow wrote:
I purposly bought a 2nd Westerfield MP door and a half car so I could include such lettering...
I accomplished it by an even easier route--did the two sides of a car differently (same car number, though). Since my layout is "one sided," that is, no reversing loop, I can choose which kind of service the car is in, by which side faces operators. This also means, of course, that a waybill can't "live" in the car sleeve permanently, since assignments will change with the door status. I see that as good thing, because I'm trying to avoid "permanent" waybills wherever possible.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Al and Patricia Westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

Anyone who's seen us at shows knows our dirty little secret: every one of our cars has a different design on the second side. I never had the time to build enough cars to single-use them. My "reason" was always Tony's, that I planned to build a point-to-loop layout, sending one train out and a new one back. - Al Westerfield

----- Original Message -----
From: Anthony Thompson
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, June 15, 2011 1:09 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Wabash S/S Box Car Roadname Lettering Question



I accomplished it by an even easier route--did the two sides
of a car differently (same car number, though). Since my layout is
"one sided," that is, no reversing loop, I can choose which kind of
service the car is in, by which side faces operators. This also means,
of course, that a waybill can't "live" in the car sleeve permanently,
since assignments will change with the door status. I see that as good
thing, because I'm trying to avoid "permanent" waybills wherever
possible.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA

a.. 2 a.. New Files 18


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Al Westerfield wrote:
Anyone who's seen us at shows knows our dirty little secret: every one of our cars has a different design on the second side. I never had the time to build enough cars to single-use them. My "reason" was always Tony's, that I planned to build a point-to-loop layout, sending one train out and a new one back. - Al Westerfield
But Al, that's almost the OPPOSITE reason--I'm talking about physically reversing the car so as to change its service. If cars like this went around a loop, the next time you saw them their waybills wouldn't fit their lettering.
On my old layout, where a reversing loop at one end did exist, I liked the idea of what Al states, that the train could change by cars being from an entirely different railroad when you next saw them. But of course this only works for "railfan" operation where you just enjoy the passing parade, not for operation with waybills and car cards.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


cef39us <cfrench@...>
 

The WABASH was always to the right of the doors of the S/S
automobile cars. The cars that were converted to single 6'
door cars had the WABASH moved to the left of the door and
the reporting mark and number moved the right side. There is
a possiblity that we will see the converted single door cars
offered by Sunshine Models in the future.

Chet French
Dixon, IL

--- In STMFC@..., "wabash2813" <reporterllc@...> wrote:

Am building an HO Speedswitch Media Wabash automobile boxcar. (By the way, this is wonderful kit, but I would have preferred the ladder stiles on the ends to be molded on. I have already broke one drilling it and am having a fun time getting the flash off the one I didn't break.)

To the point: I notice all the photos show the "WABASH" roadname lettering on the right side of the car. However, I recently came across a photo of one used in LCL service with the roadname lettering on the left side. Unfortunately, the photo does not show the car number. The door is opened to the right.

Did this have anything to do with which direction the door opened or could this be a single door car? Or is there some other variable? The photo was taken in the early 50s. Another interesting thing about the car is the "H" in Wabash sits higher than the rest of the lettering. Chet: If you read this, it is the car pictured in my "The Gary Local, The Last Mixed Train in Indiana" with Sam Fisher loading LCL. Folks, I can't post the photo here as it's from the Indiana Historical Society (Richard Simons photo) and the WRRHS had to pay some bucks to get it in the Banner.

Victor Baird
Fort Wayne, Indiana


reporterllc
 

Thanks Chet. Now I wonder if any of the automobile cars that were not converted were used in LCL service? I think Kalmbach's first 1950s special issue has a color photo of one of these Wabash cars being unloaded at a road crossing and taken by the late Linn Wescott. I will have to dig that one out.

Victor Baird
Fort Wayne, Indiana

--- In STMFC@..., "cef39us" <cfrench@...> wrote:

The WABASH was always to the right of the doors of the S/S
automobile cars. The cars that were converted to single 6'
door cars had the WABASH moved to the left of the door and
the reporting mark and number moved the right side. There is
a possiblity that we will see the converted single door cars
offered by Sunshine Models in the future.

Chet French
Dixon, IL


--- In STMFC@..., "wabash2813" <reporterllc@> wrote:

Am building an HO Speedswitch Media Wabash automobile boxcar. (By the way, this is wonderful kit, but I would have preferred the ladder stiles on the ends to be molded on. I have already broke one drilling it and am having a fun time getting the flash off the one I didn't break.)

To the point: I notice all the photos show the "WABASH" roadname lettering on the right side of the car. However, I recently came across a photo of one used in LCL service with the roadname lettering on the left side. Unfortunately, the photo does not show the car number. The door is opened to the right.

Did this have anything to do with which direction the door opened or could this be a single door car? Or is there some other variable? The photo was taken in the early 50s. Another interesting thing about the car is the "H" in Wabash sits higher than the rest of the lettering. Chet: If you read this, it is the car pictured in my "The Gary Local, The Last Mixed Train in Indiana" with Sam Fisher loading LCL. Folks, I can't post the photo here as it's from the Indiana Historical Society (Richard Simons photo) and the WRRHS had to pay some bucks to get it in the Banner.

Victor Baird
Fort Wayne, Indiana