Colour match for the Rutland


Pierre <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Can someone offer a suggestion for colour matching the tone of boxcar red used by the Rutland,circa 1945?
Thanks,
Pierre Oliver


Marty McGuirk
 

Pierre,

Would love to help, but not sure what a "colour" is?????

If you're looking for color - one of Scalecoat's two "other" Boxcar Reds (Red #2 or Red #3) are what I used when I recently painted a Westerfield Rutland car. I just don't remember if it was #2 or #3 (it's the one that's more red and less brown) I'm at work now so can't confirm until this evening.

Here's a good color picture of a restored Rutland car - I know the Strasburg Museum actually does pretty good research on their freight cars, and I asssume they matched the finish color - sorry "colour" - on this car to an original piece of paint.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/35138806@N08/3746479181/in/set-72157621684115512

Good luck,

Marty McGuirk

--- In STMFC@..., "Pierre" <pierre.oliver@...> wrote:

Can someone offer a suggestion for colour matching the tone of boxcar red used by the Rutland,circa 1945?
Thanks,
Pierre Oliver


Pierre <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Thanks, Marty.
A quick look at the paint rack suggests Scalecoat Boxcar Red #2.
I've always wondered when America decided to shed the "u" in many words. Armour, honour, colour, etc. But I digress...
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@..., "Marty" <mjmcguirk@...> wrote:


Pierre,

Would love to help, but not sure what a "colour" is?????

If you're looking for color - one of Scalecoat's two "other" Boxcar Reds (Red #2 or Red #3) are what I used when I recently painted a Westerfield Rutland car. I just don't remember if it was #2 or #3 (it's the one that's more red and less brown) I'm at work now so can't confirm until this evening.

Here's a good color picture of a restored Rutland car - I know the Strasburg Museum actually does pretty good research on their freight cars, and I asssume they matched the finish color - sorry "colour" - on this car to an original piece of paint.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/35138806@N08/3746479181/in/set-72157621684115512

Good luck,

Marty McGuirk


--- In STMFC@..., "Pierre" <pierre.oliver@> wrote:

Can someone offer a suggestion for colour matching the tone of boxcar red used by the Rutland,circa 1945?
Thanks,
Pierre Oliver


Clark Propst
 

Pierre, I have lots of Armour reefers : ))
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa

----- Original Message -----
From: Pierre
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2011 7:30 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Colour match for the Rutland


I've always wondered when America decided to shed the "u" in many words. Armour, honour, colour, etc. But I digress...
Pierre Oliver


john.allyn@...
 

While we're on the subject -- I am working on an F&C Rutland milk car.  I would like to know what color to paint the car.  I'm pretty sure that the body was green with black roof and underbody.  But what shade of green?  I recollect that Laconia made a model of this car back in the mid fifties (I was a kid then, but at Xmas my uncle always gave me a subscription to Model Railroader which I devoured each month) and the green that Laconia used was a bright Kelly green.  Not that 1950's kit makers were sticklers for prototype accuracy,  but interesting if true.  Does anyone have an answer?

John B. Allyn

----- Original Message -----
From: "Pierre" <pierre.oliver@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2011 7:30:15 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Colour match for the Rutland

 




Thanks, Marty.
A quick look at the paint rack suggests Scalecoat Boxcar Red #2.
I've always wondered when America decided to shed the "u" in many words. Armour, honour, colour, etc. But I digress...
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@... , "Marty" <mjmcguirk@...> wrote:


Pierre,

Would love to help, but not sure what a "colour" is?????

If you're looking for color - one of Scalecoat's two "other" Boxcar Reds (Red #2 or Red #3) are what I used when I recently painted a Westerfield Rutland car. I just don't remember if it was #2 or #3 (it's the one that's more red and less brown) I'm at work now so can't confirm until this evening.

Here's a good color picture of a restored Rutland car - I know the Strasburg Museum actually does pretty good research on their freight cars, and I asssume they matched the finish color - sorry "colour" - on this car to an original piece of paint.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/35138806@N08/3746479181/in/set-72157621684115512

Good luck,

Marty McGuirk


--- In STMFC@... , "Pierre" <pierre.oliver@> wrote:

Can someone offer a suggestion for colour matching the tone of boxcar red used by the Rutland,circa 1945?
Thanks,
Pierre Oliver



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Charles Hladik
 

John,

I was using Pullman Green until I bought the Railworks milk cars. They
look to be Coach Green.
Some one gave me a 3 car set of the Laconia cars and they are NOT the
right color.
Also forwarded to a couple more folks.
Chuck Hladik
Rutland Railroad
Virginia Division

In a message dated 7/15/2011 9:22:54 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
john.allyn@... writes:




While we're on the subject -- I am working on an F&C Rutland milk car. I
would like to know what color to paint the car. I'm pretty sure that the
body was green with black roof and underbody. But what shade of green? I
recollect that Laconia made a model of this car back in the mid fifties (I
was a kid then, but at Xmas my uncle always gave me a subscription to Model
Railroader which I devoured each month) and the green that Laconia used was
a bright Kelly green. Not that 1950's kit makers were sticklers for
prototype accuracy, but interesting if true. Does anyone have an answer?

John B. Allyn
----- Original Message -----
From: "Pierre" <_pierre.oliver@... (mailto:pierre.oliver@...) >
To: _STMFC@... (mailto:STMFC@...)
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2011 7:30:15 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Colour match for the Rutland



Thanks, Marty.
A quick look at the paint rack suggests Scalecoat Boxcar Red #2.
I've always wondered when America decided to shed the "u" in many words.
Armour, honour, colour, etc. But I digress...
Pierre Oliver

--- In _STMFC@... (mailto:STMFC@...) , "Marty"
<mjmcguirk@...> wrote:


Pierre,

Would love to help, but not sure what a "colour" is?????

If you're looking for color - one of Scalecoat's two "other" Boxcar Reds
(Red #2 or Red #3) are what I used when I recently painted a Westerfield
Rutland car. I just don't remember if it was #2 or #3 (it's the one that's
more red and less brown) I'm at work now so can't confirm until this evening.


Here's a good color picture of a restored Rutland car - I know the
Strasburg Museum actually does pretty good research on their freight cars, and I
asssume they matched the finish color - sorry "colour" - on this car to an
original piece of paint.

_http://www.flickr.com/photos/35138806@N08/3746479181/in/set-72157621684115512_
(http://www.flickr.com/photos/35138806@N08/3746479181/in/set-72157621684115512)

Good luck,

Marty McGuirk


--- In _STMFC@... (mailto:STMFC@...) , "Pierre"
<pierre.oliver@> wrote:

Can someone offer a suggestion for colour matching the tone of boxcar
red used by the Rutland,circa 1945?
Thanks,
Pierre Oliver
>
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Pierre <pierre.oliver@...>
 

John,
I'm pretty sure that should be Pullman Green for those cars. Scalecoat or Floquil.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@..., john.allyn@... wrote:

While we're on the subject -- I am working on an F&C Rutland milk car.  I would like to know what color to paint the car.  I'm pretty sure that the body was green with black roof and underbody.  But what shade of green?  I recollect that Laconia made a model of this car back in the mid fifties (I was a kid then, but at Xmas my uncle always gave me a subscription to Model Railroader which I devoured each month) and the green that Laconia used was a bright Kelly green.  Not that 1950's kit makers were sticklers for prototype accuracy,  but interesting if true.  Does anyone have an answer?

John B. Allyn
----- Original Message -----
From: "Pierre" <pierre.oliver@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2011 7:30:15 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Colour match for the Rutland

 




Thanks, Marty.
A quick look at the paint rack suggests Scalecoat Boxcar Red #2.
I've always wondered when America decided to shed the "u" in many words. Armour, honour, colour, etc. But I digress...
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@... , "Marty" <mjmcguirk@> wrote:


Pierre,

Would love to help, but not sure what a "colour" is?????

If you're looking for color - one of Scalecoat's two "other" Boxcar Reds (Red #2 or Red #3) are what I used when I recently painted a Westerfield Rutland car. I just don't remember if it was #2 or #3 (it's the one that's more red and less brown) I'm at work now so can't confirm until this evening.

Here's a good color picture of a restored Rutland car - I know the Strasburg Museum actually does pretty good research on their freight cars, and I asssume they matched the finish color - sorry "colour" - on this car to an original piece of paint.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/35138806@N08/3746479181/in/set-72157621684115512

Good luck,

Marty McGuirk


--- In STMFC@... , "Pierre" <pierre.oliver@> wrote:

Can someone offer a suggestion for colour matching the tone of boxcar red used by the Rutland,circa 1945?
Thanks,
Pierre Oliver



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Pierre <pierre.oliver@...>
 

And that's the one place where the "u" was left in use. I always wondered about that. Perhaps that's because in this case it is someone's name?
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@..., "Clark and Eileen" <cepropst@...> wrote:

Pierre, I have lots of Armour reefers : ))
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa
----- Original Message -----
From: Pierre
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2011 7:30 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Colour match for the Rutland


I've always wondered when America decided to shed the "u" in many words. Armour, honour, colour, etc. But I digress...
Pierre Oliver



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


PennsyNut <pennsynut@...>
 

On 15,07 2011 7:30 AM, Pierre wrote:

Thanks, Marty.
A quick look at the paint rack suggests Scalecoat Boxcar Red #2.
I've always wondered when America decided to shed the "u" in many
words. Armour, honour, colour, etc. But I digress...
Pierre Oliver
You say po tay toe, I say po tah toe, etc. I agree with Pierre, we
American's have had a hay day with English. Petrol became gas! Bonnet
became hood! bunches of stuff. Digression is fun -- sometimes. LOL
And thanks to our moderator for shutting off the NMRA, Conventions, etc.
I kept wondering what that all has to do with steam.
Morgan Bilbo Ferroequinologist SPF PRRTHS #1204


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jul 15, 2011, at 5:30 AM, Pierre wrote:

Thanks, Marty.
A quick look at the paint rack suggests Scalecoat Boxcar Red #2.
I've always wondered when America decided to shed the "u" in many
words. Armour, honour, colour, etc. But I digress...
Putting on one of my other hats, as a retired professor of English
linguistics I can tell you that Americans dropped the "u" in colour,
labour, etc. owing almost entirely to the efforts of Noah Webster,
whose spelling books predominated in U. S. schools for several
generations. Webster, caught in the post-colonial American revolt
against all things British, believed that American English had
diverged far enough from British English to be considered a separate
language with its own standards. That wasn't true, but it WAS true
that American English had evolved into a number of regional dialects
that were notably different from any of the dialects of British
English, including what linguists call RSB (Received Standard
British), the non-regional dialect of the upper classes and the upper
class universities which became the standard for written English on
both sides of the Atlantic. Webster wanted to completely reform
American spelling, an effort which largely failed, but he did succeed
in dropping the "u" in the spellings of "-our" words, changing "gaol"
to "jail," and numerous other minor revisions which persist today.
Thanks to Webster, though the clues are subtle, one can look at
almost any book written in modern English and quickly determine
whether it was published in the United States or in Great Britain or
a Commonwealth country.

Now, to drag a freight car topic in by the ears, why didn't the
spelling change in the name of the Armour packing company? As you
suggested in another post, Armour reefers still have the "u" in the
name because it was a family name which the family chose not to
change. Family names, understandably, tend to preserve obsolete
spellings. Another example is the Morrell packing company, where the
double "R" and double "L" survived, though the name of the mushroom
species that's pronounced the same way is "morel." Many family names
were already established well before English spelling began to be
standardized in the 18th century.


Richard Hendrickson


Armand Premo
 

More hot air than steam IMHO.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: PennsyNut
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2011 12:17 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Colour match for the Rutland



On 15,07 2011 7:30 AM, Pierre wrote:
>
> Thanks, Marty.
> A quick look at the paint rack suggests Scalecoat Boxcar Red #2.
> I've always wondered when America decided to shed the "u" in many
> words. Armour, honour, colour, etc. But I digress...
> Pierre Oliver
>
You say po tay toe, I say po tah toe, etc. I agree with Pierre, we
American's have had a hay day with English. Petrol became gas! Bonnet
became hood! bunches of stuff. Digression is fun -- sometimes. LOL
And thanks to our moderator for shutting off the NMRA, Conventions, etc.
I kept wondering what that all has to do with steam.
Morgan Bilbo Ferroequinologist SPF PRRTHS #1204








------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Internal Virus Database is out of date.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 9.0.891 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/3235 - Release Date: 11/03/10 04:36:00


Rossiter, Mark W <Mark.Rossiter@...>
 

The "Remembering the Rutland" website has a Q&A section that contains
several postings regarding recommended passenger car, freight car and
caboose colors.



http://users.rcn.com/jimdu4/Q&A/q&a.htm



There are a number of color books on the Rutland that allow you to make
your own judgment based on the era you are modeling. The topic of "what
is the correct color of Pullman Green?" could generate a thousand
responses alone.



Bob's Photo has a ton of color pictures available for sale also,
although many of his are of the later yellow and green scheme of the
50's than from earlier eras.



Do an internet search and you are sure to stumble across some of the
Fallen Flags photo hosting sites.



- - Mark


Armand Premo
 

Wet yet?

----- Original Message -----
From: Armand Premo
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2011 1:56 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Colour match for the Rutland



More hot air than steam IMHO.Armand Premo
----- Original Message -----
From: PennsyNut
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2011 12:17 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Colour match for the Rutland

On 15,07 2011 7:30 AM, Pierre wrote:
>
> Thanks, Marty.
> A quick look at the paint rack suggests Scalecoat Boxcar Red #2.
> I've always wondered when America decided to shed the "u" in many
> words. Armour, honour, colour, etc. But I digress...
> Pierre Oliver
>
You say po tay toe, I say po tah toe, etc. I agree with Pierre, we
American's have had a hay day with English. Petrol became gas! Bonnet
became hood! bunches of stuff. Digression is fun -- sometimes. LOL
And thanks to our moderator for shutting off the NMRA, Conventions, etc.
I kept wondering what that all has to do with steam.
Morgan Bilbo Ferroequinologist SPF PRRTHS #1204



----------------------------------------------------------

Internal Virus Database is out of date.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 9.0.891 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/3235 - Release Date: 11/03/10 04:36:00








------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Internal Virus Database is out of date.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 9.0.891 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/3235 - Release Date: 11/03/10 04:36:00


Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

Good thing that the Simplified Spelling Board's style that Andrew Carnegie favoured didn't catch on.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...> wrote:

On Jul 15, 2011, at 5:30 AM, Pierre wrote:

Thanks, Marty.
A quick look at the paint rack suggests Scalecoat Boxcar Red #2.
I've always wondered when America decided to shed the "u" in many
words. Armour, honour, colour, etc. But I digress...
Putting on one of my other hats, as a retired professor of English
linguistics I can tell you that Americans dropped the "u" in colour,
labour, etc. owing almost entirely to the efforts of Noah Webster,
whose spelling books predominated in U. S. schools for several
generations. Webster, caught in the post-colonial American revolt
against all things British, believed that American English had
diverged far enough from British English to be considered a separate
language with its own standards. That wasn't true, but it WAS true
that American English had evolved into a number of regional dialects
that were notably different from any of the dialects of British
English, including what linguists call RSB (Received Standard
British), the non-regional dialect of the upper classes and the upper
class universities which became the standard for written English on
both sides of the Atlantic. Webster wanted to completely reform
American spelling, an effort which largely failed, but he did succeed
in dropping the "u" in the spellings of "-our" words, changing "gaol"
to "jail," and numerous other minor revisions which persist today.
Thanks to Webster, though the clues are subtle, one can look at
almost any book written in modern English and quickly determine
whether it was published in the United States or in Great Britain or
a Commonwealth country.

Now, to drag a freight car topic in by the ears, why didn't the
spelling change in the name of the Armour packing company? As you
suggested in another post, Armour reefers still have the "u" in the
name because it was a family name which the family chose not to
change. Family names, understandably, tend to preserve obsolete
spellings. Another example is the Morrell packing company, where the
double "R" and double "L" survived, though the name of the mushroom
species that's pronounced the same way is "morel." Many family names
were already established well before English spelling began to be
standardized in the 18th century.


Richard Hendrickson



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


roblmclear <rob.mclear3@...>
 

Pierre

Actually the Americans have it right, they took the spelling back to the old English way of doing things before the changes were made in the English along the way, according to a History Channel program on the English Language, done by the Brits themselves...Anyway I digress as well and now for the Freight car content...

Can someone please advise me when the small red star started to appear on the Armour Meat Reefers, I think it was in the 50's but as I model the late 1940's (1947) I would like some idea of a date, thanks and regards

Rob McLear.

--- In STMFC@..., "Pierre" <pierre.oliver@...> wrote:

Thanks, Marty.
A quick look at the paint rack suggests Scalecoat Boxcar Red #2.
I've always wondered when America decided to shed the "u" in many words. Armour, honour, colour, etc. But I digress...
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@..., "Marty" <mjmcguirk@> wrote:


Pierre,

Would love to help, but not sure what a "colour" is?????

If you're looking for color - one of Scalecoat's two "other" Boxcar Reds (Red #2 or Red #3) are what I used when I recently painted a Westerfield Rutland car. I just don't remember if it was #2 or #3 (it's the one that's more red and less brown) I'm at work now so can't confirm until this evening.

Here's a good color picture of a restored Rutland car - I know the Strasburg Museum actually does pretty good research on their freight cars, and I asssume they matched the finish color - sorry "colour" - on this car to an original piece of paint.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/35138806@N08/3746479181/in/set-72157621684115512

Good luck,

Marty McGuirk


--- In STMFC@..., "Pierre" <pierre.oliver@> wrote:

Can someone offer a suggestion for colour matching the tone of boxcar red used by the Rutland,circa 1945?
Thanks,
Pierre Oliver


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jul 17, 2011, at 5:54 PM, roblmclear wrote:

Can someone please advise me when the small red star started to
appear on the Armour Meat Reefers, I think it was in the 50's but
as I model the late 1940's (1947) I would like some idea of a date,
thanks and regards
Rob, the rectangular Armour logo with the red star at the upper right
corner first appeared in 1951.

Richard Hendrickson


Dave Nelson
 

President Teddy Roosevelt issued an Executive Order instructing Federal
Employees to change the spelling of a large number of words based on certain
patterns -- z for s in words like initialize, drop the superfluous u in
words like colour, my favorite: change the suffix ed to t wherever it is
pronounct like a t. The idea was to increase productivity. The Civil
Service objected (what a surprise!) and appealed to Congress. Congress
played Solomon and cut the baby in half, giving the Civil Servants back
their ed, taking away their extra u, and amiably agreed that z made more
sense than s.

Dave Nelson

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Pierre

I've always wondered when America decided to shed the "u" in many words.
Armour, honour, colour, etc