Tarnished brass


Charles Hladik
 

List,
Any suggestions for removing light tarnish on my brass, Nickel Plate
Products, steam era freight car?
TIA,
Chuck Hladik


Tim O'Connor
 

Chuck

Brass polish should do it. Same stuff you'd use on brass candlesticks.

Note that most brass has a lacquer clearcoat -- a bath in lacquer thinner
will remove this, followed by a warm bath in detergent. Then polish, and
bathe again.

Tim O'Connor

At 11/5/2011 10:14 PM Saturday, you wrote:
List,
Any suggestions for removing light tarnish on my brass, Nickel Plate
Products, steam era freight car?
TIA,
Chuck Hladik


dennyanspach <danspach@...>
 

Unless shiny brass is a requirement for display purposes. However, the usual tarnish should be of no concern if the model is to painted; that is, if the usual routine common sense preparations for painting brass are otherwise undertaken.

As but several ad hoc personal examples, I have a number of NPP models whose tarnished exteriors have been painted, painted well, and have stood up for decades looking great.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento


Tim O'Connor
 

Denny

True, with the caveat that not all brass is the same -- brass
comes in many alloy forms with different oxidation properties.
Also, tarnish can come from contact with another material - I
just bought a tarnished brass model that looks like someone left
a key from a paint can lying on it for a long time. I plan to
grit blast the car.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/150685087107

But usually, you're right - tarnish disappears once the car is
painted. Unlike fingerprints! :-)

Tim O'

Unless shiny brass is a requirement for display purposes. However, the usual tarnish should be of no concern if the model is to painted; that is, if the usual routine common sense preparations for painting brass are otherwise undertaken.

As but several ad hoc personal examples, I have a number of NPP models whose tarnished exteriors have been painted, painted well, and have stood up for decades looking great.

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento


Don <riverman_vt@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Denny

True, with the caveat that not all brass is the same -- brass
comes in many alloy forms with different oxidation properties.
Also, tarnish can come from contact with another material - I
just bought a tarnished brass model that looks like someone left
a key from a paint can lying on it for a long time. I plan to
grit blast the car.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/150685087107

But usually, you're right - tarnish disappears once the car is
painted. Unlike fingerprints! :-)

That's more like it, Tim. I was about to ask what was the matter with the good old, tried and true North Coast booth for cleaning brass with aluminum oxide media. It not only removes the tarnish and any remaining, and detail hiding, lacquer, it also provides a nice
"toothy" surface for paint to grip. It is hard to beat such a surface and the use of also tried and true Scalecoat I paint. I still prefer Accu-paint for styrene but have never found a paint better than Scalecoat for the base coat(s) on brass. YMMV.

Cordially, Don Valentine