Was a 7-ft box car door really . . .


Brian <cornbeltroute@...>
 

seven feet (for example) wide? Or, was it typical for box car doors to be a bit wider because the actual box car door opening was seven feet (for example) wide, and doors needed to span the opening plus some? If so, was this a common building practice?

Thanks much,

Brian Chapman
Evansdale, Iowa


Benjamin Hom
 

Brian Chapman asked:
"Was a 7-ft box car door really seven feet (for example) wide?"

No.

"Or, was it typical for box car doors to be a bit wider because the actual box
car door opening was seven feet (for example) wide, and doors needed to span the
opening plus some?"

Yes.

"If so, was this a common building practice?"

Yes.


Ben Hom


Dick Dawson <dickdawson@...>
 

Seven-foot door openings were not as common as six-foot or eight-foot, but
they did exist. Even though the bodies of sliding doors are wider than the
opening by several inches, published door sizes always refer to the width
and height of the clear opening and not to the size of the door itself.



Dick Dawson



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Brian
Sent: Wednesday, November 09, 2011 12:58 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Was a 7-ft box car door really . . .





seven feet (for example) wide? Or, was it typical for box car doors to be a
bit wider because the actual box car door opening was seven feet (for
example) wide, and doors needed to span the opening plus some? If so, was
this a common building practice?

Thanks much,

Brian Chapman
Evansdale, Iowa


Greg Martin
 

Brian,

The simple answer is yes the door for a 7-foot wide rough opening was
definitely wider. Not in every case but generally 3-5/8" wider with the right
hand edge of the door covered by a piece of channel to keep the door aligned.

Greg Martin


Brian Chapman wrote:
seven feet (for example) wide? Or, was it typical for box car doors to be
a bit wider because the actual box car door opening was seven feet (for
example) wide, and doors needed to span the opening plus some? If so, was this
a common building practice?

Thanks much,

Brian Chapman
Evansdale, Iowa









[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


soolinehistory <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., tgregmrtn@... wrote:

Brian,

The simple answer is yes the door for a 7-foot wide rough opening was
definitely wider. Not in every case but generally 3-5/8" wider with the right
hand edge of the door covered by a piece of channel to keep the door aligned.

Greg Martin
Right hand edge? Maybe when looking from inside the car. Normal US usage is to have the door open to the right, with the LEFT edge fitting into a pressed steel channel.

The RIGHT edge of the door, looking from the outside, has a formed hook shaped strip called the spark guard, a name that dates back to the days of steam, that engages a similar hook mounted on the car side at the edge of the door opening, to provide a rain and yes, cinder proof seal. Modelers don't need to worry about these parts as they are never seen, always hidden behind the door.

Dennis


Greg Martin
 

Dennis,

You are correct the left hand side... 3^) But you're also correct right hand as you are looking at it from the inside out and I have done that pleanty of times in my life. I never realized there was a name for the "channel" I just know I tore a lot of shit sleeve on them as they were so often damage from some guy trying to pry the door open there... 3^)

Greg Martin

-----Original Message-----
From: soolinehistory <destorzek@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Thu, Nov 10, 2011 7:17 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Was a 7-ft box car door really . . .






--- In STMFC@..., tgregmrtn@... wrote:

Brian,

The simple answer is yes the door for a 7-foot wide rough opening was
definitely wider. Not in every case but generally 3-5/8" wider with the right
hand edge of the door covered by a piece of channel to keep the door aligned.

Greg Martin
Right hand edge? Maybe when looking from inside the car. Normal US usage is to have the door open to the right, with the LEFT edge fitting into a pressed steel channel.

The RIGHT edge of the door, looking from the outside, has a formed hook shaped strip called the spark guard, a name that dates back to the days of steam, that engages a similar hook mounted on the car side at the edge of the door opening, to provide a rain and yes, cinder proof seal. Modelers don't need to worry about these parts as they are never seen, always hidden behind the door.

Dennis







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Jim Mischke
 

What we call a seven foot door is actually the prototype door opening width.

If I recall correctly, this was first pointed out by C&NW boxcar expert Jeff Koeller at a Naperville presentation a few years ago. Previous to that, it was common for modelmakers to make the door itself the nominal six, seven, eight foot wide. And we customers did not know the difference. Few if any of us checked drawings.

--- In STMFC@..., "Brian" <cornbeltroute@...> wrote:

seven feet (for example) wide? Or, was it typical for box car doors to be a bit wider because the actual box car door opening was seven feet (for example) wide, and doors needed to span the opening plus some? If so, was this a common building practice?

Thanks much,

Brian Chapman
Evansdale, Iowa


Andy Carlson
 

Yes, and at least one manufacturer, Front Range Products, made that same
mistake.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


________________________________
From: jim_mischke <jmischke@...>




What we call a seven foot door is actually the prototype door opening width.

Previous to that, it was common for modelmakers to make the door itself the
nominal six, seven, eight foot wide. And we customers did not know the
difference. Few if any of us checked drawings.

--


Scott Pitzer
 

Those too-narrow 6' doors were typically too short also, because of the fat door tracks. So they were somewhat in-proportion to the eye.
But it made it difficult for those Weston figures to unload the cars.
Scott Pitzer
________________________________

From: jim_mischke <jmischke@...>

What we call a seven foot door is actually the prototype door opening width.

Previous to that, it was common for modelmakers to make the door itself the
nominal six, seven, eight foot wide. And we customers did not know the
difference. Few if any of us checked drawings.

--

.