Stock Car Question


Steve Vallee
 

Dear Group...

While looking through the June, 1954 issue of Railroad Magazine, on page 61, I found this Q&A that I wanted to share with the Group:


Q)...Approximately how many farm animals can be loaded into one stock car?

A)...That depends upon the size of the car and the kind of animal. Generally a standard 36-foot stock car holds 18 to 25 horses, 25 to 30 medium-weight beef cattle, 60 to 65 market weight hogs, or 110 to 120 fat lambs per deck of the car.


Hope this information is helpful to the Group.

Steve Vallee


Douglas Harding
 

Steve, that in general is correct. Railroads and Livestock Shipping
Associations have published such data for many years. Here is a chart
showing how many animals of a given size will fit in a stockcar. This chart
is from the Union Pacific, but I also have one from the ATSF showing the
exact same numbers, so I suspect this was a standard used by many.



Union Pacific Livestock Shipping Guide and Directory

1941



Cattle per Car

Ave. Weight 300 400 500 600 700
800 900 1000 1100 1200 1300 1400

36-ft. car 60 50 42 37
33 30 27 25 23 22
21 19

40-ft car 67 56 46 40
37 33 30 27 25 23
22 21



Hogs per Car

Ave. Weight 100 125 150 175 200
225 250 275 300 325 350 400

36-ft. car 130 115 100 89 79
73 68 62 59 56 53
47

40-ft. car 145 127 110 98 88
82 76 69 65 62 59
52



Sheep and Lambs per Car

Ave. Weight 50 75 100 125 150
180

36-ft. car 155 125 105 96 85
75

40-ft. car 170 138 116 104 94
83



The above figures are for single deck cars. In loading hogs or sheep in
double-deck cars the number loaded in the upper deck should be eight to ten
less than that recommended for loading in lower-deck or single-deck cars,
especially in hot weather.





For an earlier time period I found the following:

AMERICA'S AMAZING RAILWAY TRAFFIC National Geographic Magazine-April, 1923
By WILLIAM JOSEPH SHOWALTER



In the first place, a stock car carries less than 10 tons of hogs, less than
11 of sheep and goats, and less than 12 of horses and mules. Likewise, box
cars load less than 13 tons of hay and straw, cotton, wool, and eggs. On the
other hand, coal cars force the average loading upward. During the second
quarter of 1920 they moved more than 50 tons of bituminous coal, nearly 48
tons of anthracite, and more than 51 tons of iron ore.



Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Doug Harding wrote:
Steve, that in general is correct. Railroads and Livestock Shipping Associations have published such data for many years. Here is a chart
showing how many animals of a given size will fit in a stockcar.
Thanks, Doug. Very helpful. But heck. Now I have to decide how HEAVY my livestock is. Ah, the ever-elusive prototype reality! Such a challenge!

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


John H <sprinthag@...>
 

Well, it shouldn't be too difficult to figure out how much the livestock weighs. Let's see now .... hmmm. a three lb package of hamburger weighs three lbs so a one lb canned ham would weigh ...

Oh never mind.

John Hagen

--- In STMFC@..., Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Doug Harding wrote:
Steve, that in general is correct. Railroads and Livestock Shipping
Associations have published such data for many years. Here is a chart
showing how many animals of a given size will fit in a stockcar.
Thanks, Doug. Very helpful. But heck. Now I have to decide how
HEAVY my livestock is. Ah, the ever-elusive prototype reality! Such a
challenge!

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Douglas Harding
 

Tony glad I could help. Now to further your wealth of knowledge and enable
you to fill those stockpens and stockcars.



Weight of animals: we will talk about market ready, ie ready for slaughter,
as well as feeder, those ready to move to the feedlot from the grasslands.



Cattle: steers run about 1100-1250lbs, 100lbs less for heifers, bulls a
little more. figure 1400-1800 for the newer exotic breeds. Feeder calves
will be 400-600lbs.



Hogs: today's market looks for long and lean hog, 225-250 lbs. Which is
quite different from the period I model, 1949, when the market looked for a
fat hog at 300+ lbs. Hogs are one time were raised to 500+lbs, but that has
changed as .consumer demands have changed.



Sheep: figure about 135lbs for market ready. Feeder lambs will be about
30lbs.



Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org


Rob & Bev Manley
 

I used the Dyna-Models lead cows as weight in my Central Valley NP Stockars. I never did actually weigh and add up the total however but I am quite sure they NEVER exceeded NMRA standards.
Rob Manley
Midwest Mod-U-Trak
"Better modeling through personal embarrassment"

----- Original Message -----
From: John H
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, November 14, 2011 2:51 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Stock Car Question



Well, it shouldn't be too difficult to figure out how much the livestock weighs. Let's see now .... hmmm. a three lb package of hamburger weighs three lbs so a one lb canned ham would weigh ...

Oh never mind.

John Hagen

--- In STMFC@..., Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:
>
> Doug Harding wrote:
> > Steve, that in general is correct. Railroads and Livestock Shipping
> > Associations have published such data for many years. Here is a chart
> > showing how many animals of a given size will fit in a stockcar.
>
> Thanks, Doug. Very helpful. But heck. Now I have to decide how
> HEAVY my livestock is. Ah, the ever-elusive prototype reality! Such a
> challenge!
>
> Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
> 2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
> (510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
> Publishers of books on railroad history
>


Douglas Harding
 

Steve, Tony, and others: the chart I tried to send did not come through
Yahoo very well. I have a copy of AAR Pamphlet NO 19 "Methods for Loading
and Handling Live Stock" issued April 1925, revised January 1942. On page 8
is the same chart as used by the UP and the ATSF. A jpg of page 8 is
awaiting approval to be uploaded into a new photo album "stock cars" found
in the group photos.



Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org


Douglas Harding
 

Rob, stock cars never reached weight capacity when filled with livestock. A
40' stock car could hold 23, 1200lb steers, that is only 27600lbs or 13,8
tons, well below the capacity of the car. The only way you could over load a
stock car was if you filled it with pig iron instead of pigs. And yes pig
iron could be a possible load in a stock car. They were used to haul
anything that could withstand exposure to the weather and would fit through
the door.



Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org


benjamin
 

The DRGW used to haul ice in the winter from Rollinsville to Denver in stock cars. The ice was bedded in straw for the trip. The pictures that my father-in-law took were published in one of the one of the historical society magazines dealing with the DRGW and or the Moffit line a few years ago. The big question is were the cars steam cleaned before handling the ice? Could have been a little extra "local" flavor in your mixed drink otherwise!

I'm sure other roads did the same where hard freeze mountain areas were close to cities with warmer weather. California? East coast states?


Ben Heinley


Douglas Harding
 

Ben, stock cars were supposed to be cleaned and disinfected each time after
being used to transport livestock. Steam cleaning was the accepted means,
after one finished with the pitchfork and shovel. Then sand or cinders
several inches deep spread on the floor for traction. In winter straw was
used for bedding, required for hogs.



Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Ben Heinley wrote:
The DRGW used to haul ice in the winter from Rollinsville to Denver in stock cars. The ice was bedded in straw for the trip. The pictures that my father-in-law took were published in one of the one of the historical society magazines dealing with the DRGW and or the Moffit line a few years ago. The big question is were the cars steam cleaned before handling the ice? Could have been a little extra "local" flavor in your mixed drink otherwise!
And if straw was used, you can be sure the ice was not intended to be used in reefers. Straw would clog the bunker drains. You might be thinking that surely reefers weren't iced in winter, and that's true, but the natural ice could be stored for summer use. Just not with straw.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Tim O'Connor
 

My recollection is that straw is often used in conjunction with
ice in storage. Perhaps to prevent those 300lb blocks from turning
themselves into 3,000lb blocks? Surely the straw could simply
be brushed or washed off the ice?

In the town where I live there are several large ponds (lakes) and
in past times the ice was harvested each winter and put into storage
for use throughout the year. The rail line (now a trail) ran on a
causeway dividing one of the ponds in two.

Tim O'Connor

And if straw was used, you can be sure the ice was not intended
to be used in reefers. Straw would clog the bunker drains. You might
be thinking that surely reefers weren't iced in winter, and that's
true, but the natural ice could be stored for summer use. Just not
with straw.

Tony Thompson


jerryglow2
 

I suspect it may but thought the use of sawdust was more common.

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


My recollection is that straw is often used in conjunction with
ice in storage. Perhaps to prevent those 300lb blocks from turning
themselves into 3,000lb blocks? Surely the straw could simply
be brushed or washed off the ice?

In the town where I live there are several large ponds (lakes) and
in past times the ice was harvested each winter and put into storage
for use throughout the year. The rail line (now a trail) ran on a
causeway dividing one of the ponds in two.

Tim O'Connor





And if straw was used, you can be sure the ice was not intended
to be used in reefers. Straw would clog the bunker drains. You might
be thinking that surely reefers weren't iced in winter, and that's
true, but the natural ice could be stored for summer use. Just not
with straw.

Tony Thompson


Armand Premo
 

Heck,The Rutland used to send hay and cedar posts in their stock cars.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: jerryglow@...
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2011 11:27 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Stock Car Question



I suspect it may but thought the use of sawdust was more common.

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:
>
>
> My recollection is that straw is often used in conjunction with
> ice in storage. Perhaps to prevent those 300lb blocks from turning
> themselves into 3,000lb blocks? Surely the straw could simply
> be brushed or washed off the ice?
>
> In the town where I live there are several large ponds (lakes) and
> in past times the ice was harvested each winter and put into storage
> for use throughout the year. The rail line (now a trail) ran on a
> causeway dividing one of the ponds in two.
>
> Tim O'Connor
>
>
>
>
>
> > And if straw was used, you can be sure the ice was not intended
> >to be used in reefers. Straw would clog the bunker drains. You might
> >be thinking that surely reefers weren't iced in winter, and that's
> >true, but the natural ice could be stored for summer use. Just not
> >with straw.
> >
> >Tony Thompson
>


pullmanboss <tcmadden@...>
 

Jerry Glow wrote:

I suspect it may but thought the use of sawdust was more common.
Sawdust was commonly used if there were sawmills in the area. My father in law cut, harvested & stored pond ice in the Poconos (PA) into the late 1960's and always used sawdust for insulation. Sold ice to tourists out of his service station through the summer.

Tom Madden


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
My recollection is that straw is often used in conjunction with ice in storage. Perhaps to prevent those 300lb blocks from turning themselves into 3,000lb blocks? Surely the straw could simply be brushed or washed off the ice?
The PFE people I interviewed said NO straw, sawdust or anything else was used in storage houses. Photos of interiors of those structures confirm this.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tom Madden wrote:
Sawdust was commonly used if there were sawmills in the area. My father in law cut, harvested & stored pond ice in the Poconos (PA) into the late 1960's and always used sawdust for insulation. Sold ice to tourists out of his service station through the summer.
This does not necessarily have anything to do with ice for reefers. Sawdust clogs the drains, usually a bad thing. Consumer ice is a different story.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history