Stock Car Question - now Ice


np328
 

Ben, there are two type of ice, potable and all other.
Potable ice has to meet the same standards of "fit for human consumption" as drinking water, and this was the ice kept for railroad dining cars, etc. All other ice would be suitable for the bunker of a reefer as it would never contact the product.
However if the ice was sequestered properly in the straw, it might well remain "fit for human consumption", even if in a stock car. As others on this list have pointed out, stock cars were cleaned quite often and so would be less filthy than we imagine them to be.
James Dick - St. Paul

--- In STMFC@..., "benjamin" <bheinley@...> wrote:
The DRGW used to haul ice in the winter from Rollinsville to Denver in stock cars. The ice was bedded in straw for the trip. The pictures that my father-in-law took were published in one of the one of the historical society magazines dealing with the DRGW and or the Moffit line a few years ago. The big question is were the cars steam cleaned before handling the ice? Could have been a little extra "local" flavor in your mixed drink otherwise!
I'm sure other roads did the same where hard freeze mountain areas were close to cities with warmer weather. California? East coast states?
Ben Heinley


Bill Welch
 

However the same 300 blocks of ice used in the bunkers would have also been ground and sprayed into cars for those crops, mainly vegetables, that were "top iced" so this ice too should have been as free as possible of bacteria I would think. The few photos I have of ice being moved around on the FGE/WFE/BRE System shows it being done in refrigerator cars, both those in active freight service and those downgraded to "Ice Service."

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., "np328" <jcdworkingonthenp@...> wrote:

Ben, there are two type of ice, potable and all other.
Potable ice has to meet the same standards of "fit for human consumption" as drinking water, and this was the ice kept for railroad dining cars, etc. All other ice would be suitable for the bunker of a reefer as it would never contact the product.
However if the ice was sequestered properly in the straw, it might well remain "fit for human consumption", even if in a stock car. As others on this list have pointed out, stock cars were cleaned quite often and so would be less filthy than we imagine them to be.
James Dick - St. Paul

--- In STMFC@..., "benjamin" <bheinley@> wrote:
The DRGW used to haul ice in the winter from Rollinsville to Denver in stock cars. The ice was bedded in straw for the trip. The pictures that my father-in-law took were published in one of the one of the historical society magazines dealing with the DRGW and or the Moffit line a few years ago. The big question is were the cars steam cleaned before handling the ice? Could have been a little extra "local" flavor in your mixed drink otherwise!
I'm sure other roads did the same where hard freeze mountain areas were close to cities with warmer weather. California? East coast states?
Ben Heinley


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Bill Welch wrote:
However the same 300 blocks of ice used in the bunkers . . .
I think Ben Heinley was talking about natural ice, usually cut in much smaller blocks than 300-lb. manufactured ice blocks. And of course (as Bill knows) the 300-lb. blocks were NOT used in bunkers but were split at least into quarters and usually smaller, for bunker icing.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


benjamin
 

-The ice was natural pond ice. Pictures showed a conveyor system that was used to get the ice into the stock cars but it had to be manhandled into stacking position. The ice was in large slabs. Looked like they were about a foot thick by about 2-1/2 feet wide by about 4 feet long. Some of the interior shots also showed snow banked up in the end of the car on top of the ice (Blown in on the trip up the mountain or deposited in the car while waiting to be loaded.) The ice was stacked about 4 feet deep on the ends and looked like it was going to be stacked even deeper. I think this ice was being shipped to Denver for summer use.

A funny story my father-in-law told me about taking the photos was that he slipped and fell on the ice while taking pictures of the harvesting. All he could think about was his Speedgraphix camera disappearing forever as it slid toward the open water at the edge of the ice. Luckily one of the ice herders saw it going and snagged it with his peavey hook before it went in. His comment to me was "When you are on the ice you need to wear caulk boots!"

Ben