Reweigh rules


Norm Buckhart
 

can anyone sight the Rule number and language that requires 3 year reweighing of cars. thanks in advance, Norm Buckhart


Guy Wilber
 

Norm Buckhart wrote:

can anyone sight the Rule number and language that requires 3 year
reweighing of cars. thanks in advance, Norm Buckhart
Interchange Rule 30. What year, what car construction, and information do you seek? The Rule and charts cover three pages. Bear in mind that subsequent reweigh periods were not always 36 months, they were more frequent early on.

Regards,

Guy Wilber
Sparks, Nevada

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Norm Buckhart
 

wow - ok - generally around 1936-1955. I'm working on boxcar decals during this period. Norm

On Nov 30, 2011, at 4:59 PM, Guy Wilber wrote:

Norm Buckhart wrote:

can anyone sight the Rule number and language that requires 3 year
reweighing of cars. thanks in advance, Norm Buckhart
Interchange Rule 30. What year, what car construction, and information do you seek? The Rule and charts cover three pages. Bear in mind that subsequent reweigh periods were not always 36 months, they were more frequent early on.

Regards,

Guy Wilber
Sparks, Nevada
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Norm Buckhart wrote:
can anyone sight the Rule number and language that requires 3 year reweighing of cars.
Guy Wilber replied:
Interchange Rule 30. What year, what car construction, and information do you seek? The Rule and charts cover three pages. Bear in mind that subsequent reweigh periods were not always 36 months, they were more frequent early on.
And after 1948 (I forget the month) reweigh for most cars after the first reweigh was 48 months, not 36.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Norm Buckhart
 

that may be enough information. So as I understand it - for a car say
built Dec 1945, the first reweigh date would be in 36 months - or Dec
1948, but then the second reweigh date might be Dec 51 or more
probably Dec 52. I think I can go from there. Frank Peacock has sent
me about 20 pages of reweigh station symbols by railroad so I think I
can provide some meaningful decal sheets. Thanks, Norm

On Nov 30, 2011, at 5:23 PM, Anthony Thompson wrote:

Norm Buckhart wrote:
can anyone sight the Rule number and language that requires 3 year
reweighing of cars.
Guy Wilber replied:
Interchange Rule 30. What year, what car construction, and
information do you seek? The Rule and charts cover three pages.
Bear in mind that subsequent reweigh periods were not always 36
months, they were more frequent early on.
And after 1948 (I forget the month) reweigh for most cars
after the first reweigh was 48 months, not 36.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


william darnaby
 

I just looked this up as I was applying proper dates to cars. According to
my 1/53 ORER, page 753, under Rule 11 of Code of Car Service Rules the first
reweigh for all steel house cars was 30 months and 48 months for subsequent
reweighs.

Bill Darnaby


Guy Wilber
 

On Nov 30, 2011, at 5:33 PM, Norm Buckhart wrote:

that may be enough information. So as I understand it - for a car say
built Dec 1945, the first reweigh date would be in 36 months - or Dec
1948, but then the second reweigh date might be Dec 51 or more
probably Dec 52.





Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Norm Buckhart wrote:
that may be enough information. So as I understand it - for a car say built Dec 1945, the first reweigh date would be in 36 months - or Dec
1948, but then the second reweigh date might be Dec 51 or more probably Dec 52. I think I can go from there.
Norm, it depends on car type, among other things. I made a table of the rules for the late 1930s to 1960s, which was supposed to be in the article I did on reweigh dates for Railroad Model Craftsman_ but somewhere in the production process it got mutilated. A full version is available on Google Docs at this link:

https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=explorer&chrome=true&srcid=0Bz_ctrHrDz4wYzQ1YzZmZWEtNjU2ZS00Y2RjLTkyYTQtYjJkOWNiZDFlM2Y3&hl=en

and the table is on the second page; or you can find it via my blog post on the subject, at:

http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2011/03/reweigh-article-from-rmc.html

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Tim O'Connor
 

Bill

Yep, that's what I use as a rule when decaling -- 2.5 yrs for 1st reweigh,
6.5 yrs for 2nd, 10.5 for 3rd, etc. (The 1st is the more critical; others
can be skewed by years in either direction)

When reweighing a LOT of freight cars for the 1956-1960 era, I'm shocked by
how LITTLE decal material is available for the post-1950 era. For example
Ted Culotta's beautiful decal sets have like 13 or 14 1940's reweigh dates
and maybe 1 post-1953 date. Very frustrating. Thank goodness for Champ's
excellent data sets, but I'm using mine up quickly, and they're no longer
made.

Tim O'Connor

I just looked this up as I was applying proper dates to cars. According to
my 1/53 ORER, page 753, under Rule 11 of Code of Car Service Rules the first
reweigh for all steel house cars was 30 months and 48 months for subsequent
reweighs.

Bill Darnaby


Tim O'Connor
 

Thanks Tony. I think I should return the favor, and point out that
SP 82940 was a B-50-21 that had Equipco hand brakes (not Ajax) and
a US Gypsum running board (not wood). I'll forgive the trucks since
no one makes an ASF truck w/ spring planks.

:-) :-)

yer helpful buddy

Tim


william darnaby
 

Yeah...that's also my beef with the Sunshine reweigh decals. Well done with
repack data and air brake data but you might get one date from the 50's for
each railroad. I guess the late 40's is Martin's period of interest. I
too, have just about used up my Champ stuff.

Bill Darnaby





When reweighing a LOT of freight cars for the 1956-1960 era, I'm shocked by
how LITTLE decal material is available for the post-1950 era. For example
Ted Culotta's beautiful decal sets have like 13 or 14 1940's reweigh dates
and maybe 1 post-1953 date. Very frustrating. Thank goodness for Champ's
excellent data sets, but I'm using mine up quickly, and they're no longer
made.

Tim O'Connor





------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Brian Carlson
 

Sounds like a easy sell to Jerry Glow. I too am piecing Champ together.
Brian Carlson

--- On Thu, 12/1/11, William Darnaby <wdarnaby@att.net> wrote:


From: William Darnaby <wdarnaby@att.net>
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Reweigh rules
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, December 1, 2011, 10:16 AM



 



Yeah...that's also my beef with the Sunshine reweigh decals. Well done with
repack data and air brake data but you might get one date from the 50's for
each railroad. I guess the late 40's is Martin's period of interest. I
too, have just about used up my Champ stuff.

Bill Darnaby



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Bruce Smith
 

On Dec 1, 2011, at 9:16 AM, William Darnaby wrote:

Yeah...that's also my beef with the Sunshine reweigh decals. Well done with
repack data and air brake data but you might get one date from the 50's for
each railroad. I guess the late 40's is Martin's period of interest. I
too, have just about used up my Champ stuff.

Bill Darnaby
Bill, Folks,

That's why I have very fine scissors and strong reading glasses at my modeling bench <VBG> I've lost count of the reweigh dates I've cut apart and pieced back together to get them in the correct time frame for June of 1944... Needless to say, I don't usually float single digits in a bucket of water when decaling either!

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
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pullmanboss <tcmadden@...>
 

Bruce Smith wrote:

That's why I have very fine scissors and strong reading glasses at my modeling bench <VBG> I've lost count of the reweigh dates I've cut apart and pieced back together to get them in the correct time frame for June of 1944... Needless to say, I don't usually float single digits in a bucket of water when decaling either!
For very tiny decal bits I use a pin to place a small drop of water on the tip of my left index finger and put the decal on that. The decal will come loose in a few seconds but not float free. (That's why the "small drop".) Use fine tweezers to place the decal near where you want it on the model, then nudge the decal off the backing and into position. I use this technique for any decal smaller than my fingertip because it's much easier than chasing a floating decal across the surface of a water dish, or retreiving it from the bottom of the dish. (I use a shallow dark brown plastic cereal dish.)

Like many techniques, it takes longer to describe than do, and I suspect many of you have long since figured this one out too.

Tom Madden


pullmanboss <tcmadden@...>
 

Bruce Smith wrote:

That's why I have very fine scissors and strong reading glasses at my modeling bench <VBG> I've lost count of the reweigh dates I've cut apart and pieced back together to get them in the correct time frame for June of 1944... Needless to say, I don't usually float single digits in a bucket of water when decaling either!
For very tiny decal bits I use a pin to place a small drop of water on the tip of my left index finger and put the decal on that. The decal will come loose in a few seconds but not float free. (That's why the "small drop".) Use fine tweezers to place the decal near where you want it on the model, then nudge the decal off the backing and into position. I use this technique for any decal smaller than my fingertip because it's much easier than chasing a floating decal across the surface of a water dish, or retreiving it from the bottom of the dish. (I use a shallow dark brown plastic cereal dish.)

Like many techniques, it takes longer to describe than do, and I suspect many of you have long since figured this one out too.

Tom Madden


Joel Holmes <lehighvalley@...>
 

Hi Tom,

That is the way I have been applying decals for over 40 years now. I also
use a small screwdriver to lift the numbers off my finger and nudge them
in place. Often a car number has from 2 to 6 separate numbers. Pullman
names can have even more letters.

Joel Holmes

Bruce Smith wrote:

That's why I have very fine scissors and strong reading glasses at my
modeling bench <VBG> I've lost count of the reweigh dates I've cut
apart and pieced back together to get them in the correct time frame for
June of 1944... Needless to say, I don't usually float single digits in
a bucket of water when decaling either!
For very tiny decal bits I use a pin to place a small drop of water on the
tip of my left index finger and put the decal on that. The decal will come
loose in a few seconds but not float free. (That's why the "small drop".)
Use fine tweezers to place the decal near where you want it on the model,
then nudge the decal off the backing and into position. I use this
technique for any decal smaller than my fingertip because it's much easier
than chasing a floating decal across the surface of a water dish, or
retreiving it from the bottom of the dish. (I use a shallow dark brown
plastic cereal dish.)

Like many techniques, it takes longer to describe than do, and I suspect
many of you have long since figured this one out too.

Tom Madden


Norm Buckhart
 

Tony - got both and printed them out. thanks, norm

On Nov 30, 2011, at 10:24 PM, Anthony Thompson wrote:

Norm Buckhart wrote:
that may be enough information. So as I understand it - for a car
say built Dec 1945, the first reweigh date would be in 36 months -
or Dec
1948, but then the second reweigh date might be Dec 51 or more
probably Dec 52. I think I can go from there.
Norm, it depends on car type, among other things. I made a table
of the rules for the late 1930s to 1960s, which was supposed to be in
the article I did on reweigh dates for Railroad Model Craftsman_ but
somewhere in the production process it got mutilated. A full version
is available on Google Docs at this link:

https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=explorer&chrome=true&srcid=0Bz_ctrHrDz4wYzQ1YzZmZWEtNjU2ZS00Y2RjLTkyYTQtYjJkOWNiZDFlM2Y3&hl=en

and the table is on the second page; or you can find it via my blog
post on the subject, at:

http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2011/03/reweigh-article-from-
rmc.html

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Tim O'Connor
 

Bruce

lol! yep, I do that too... except do you how RARE the digit
"5" is on some reweigh decals? Plus because I need "56" "57"
etc, it usually means TWO single digits in a bucket of water!
I just hope my eyesight holds out.

Tim O'

Bill, Folks,

That's why I have very fine scissors and strong reading glasses at my modeling bench <VBG> I've lost count of the reweigh dates I've cut apart and pieced back together to get them in the correct time frame for June of 1944... Needless to say, I don't usually float single digits in a bucket of water when decaling either!

Regards
Bruce


jerryglow2
 

Been there done that for custom orders. I do not do a "generic" set but if you send me a text file of the dates and locations along with font type and color and you can have them.

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Brian Carlson <prrk41361@...> wrote:

Sounds like a easy sell to Jerry Glow. I too am piecing Champ together.
Brian Carlson

--- On Thu, 12/1/11, William Darnaby <wdarnaby@...> wrote:


From: William Darnaby <wdarnaby@...>
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Reweigh rules
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, December 1, 2011, 10:16 AM



 



Yeah...that's also my beef with the Sunshine reweigh decals. Well done with
repack data and air brake data but you might get one date from the 50's for
each railroad. I guess the late 40's is Martin's period of interest. I
too, have just about used up my Champ stuff.

Bill Darnaby





Jim Betz
 

Tom,

Nice trick! I went positively -bonkers- several years ago when
I did up my own BN center beam cars - more than 160 individual
decals to apply to each car (IIRC I did 2 of them and still have
a couple more that are painted but not decalled in some project
box or other).
Which probably helps explain a lot of things about me you've all
been talking about for so long ...

****

So ... why not put the drop of water right on the car and put
the dry decal in that to float off and slide into position -
thus eliminating the transfer using tweezers entirely? In
thinking about it I think the next time I have some of these
small decals I will try putting the decal on the car with its
backing very near to its final location -and then adding a
drop of water over it and sliding "almost directly to where
it wants to be". Seems like it should work.

Is there a fly in this ointment?

****

Some other questions that have probably been answered before but my
center beam addled brain doesn't recall ...

If a car was off-a-wandering when it was time to reweigh ... was
it done by the other road or did it wait until it came back to its
home rails?
I assume the cars were weighed empty and not loaded - so were
cars routed to a reweigh location (for that purpose) or did they
just wait until they were empty at one of those locations?
It would seem that individual cars -might- have 'missed' their
reweigh dates by several months or even a year or more. Correct?

- Jim (C.B.A.B.)

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "pullmanboss" <tcmadden@...> wrote:

Bruce Smith wrote:

That's why I have very fine scissors and strong reading glasses at my modeling bench <VBG> I've lost count of the reweigh dates I've cut apart and pieced back together to get them in the correct time frame for June of 1944... Needless to say, I don't usually float single digits in a bucket of water when decaling either!
For very tiny decal bits I use a pin to place a small drop of water on the tip of my left index finger and put the decal on that. The decal will come loose in a few seconds but not float free. (That's why the "small drop".) Use fine tweezers to place the decal near where you want it on the model, then nudge the decal off the backing and into position. I use this technique for any decal smaller than my fingertip because it's much easier than chasing a floating decal across the surface of a water dish, or retreiving it from the bottom of the dish. (I use a shallow dark brown plastic cereal dish.)

Like many techniques, it takes longer to describe than do, and I suspect many of you have long since figured this one out too.

Tom Madden