Roaring Rails


Al and Patricia Westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

The film was more melodrama than railroad. However, there were several AT&SF Bx-Os in evidence. Also steam shovel and dump cars. It appeared that the film was shot both on SP and Sante Fe trackage. The view of the drivers was of a much earlier loco than the long shots. Road names were painted out on the tenders.

The boy, Frankie Darro became a silent star billed as “Darro”. He appeared in a famous film, Wild Boys of the Road. He never grew and played jockeys on the take for a decade. He was inside Robbie the robot of Forbidden Planet fame but was fired for being drunk on the job. He appeared as late as the late-1950s in Have Gun Will Travel, his good looks decimated by drink. – Al Westerfield

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Joel Holmes <lehighvalley@...>
 

Hi All,

I agree with Al's view of the movie. However, it is good in that it
showed us some good views of early cars and other equipment. Although the
plot was nothing to grow about, I did enjoy the movie.

Joel Holmes

The film was more melodrama than railroad. However, there were several
AT&SF Bx-Os in evidence. Also steam shovel and dump cars. It appeared
that the film was shot both on SP and Sante Fe trackage. The view of the
drivers was of a much earlier loco than the long shots. Road names were
painted out on the tenders.

The boy, Frankie Darro became a silent star billed as “Darro�. He
appeared in a famous film, Wild Boys of the Road. He never grew and
played jockeys on the take for a decade. He was inside Robbie the robot
of Forbidden Planet fame but was fired for being drunk on the job. He
appeared as late as the late-1950s in Have Gun Will Travel, his good looks
decimated by drink. – Al Westerfield




bill davis <billcheri72@...>
 

Al,You're right it was more a melodrama but for me little 0-4-0t and dump cars, the steam shovel & dump cars was worth watching the film. Love the old model T car too the big guy had.I have a copy of "Wild Boys" and it has some great train scenes in it.Another good old film is the original "Silver Streak" with the Burlington zephyr.BILL

--- On Thu, 12/15/11, Al and Patricia Westerfield <westerfield@charter.net> wrote:

From: Al and Patricia Westerfield <westerfield@charter.net>
Subject: [STMFC] Roaring Rails
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, December 15, 2011, 10:33 PM
















 









The film was more melodrama than railroad. However, there were several AT&SF Bx-Os in evidence. Also steam shovel and dump cars. It appeared that the film was shot both on SP and Sante Fe trackage. The view of the drivers was of a much earlier loco than the long shots. Road names were painted out on the tenders.



The boy, Frankie Darro became a silent star billed as “Darro”. He appeared in a famous film, Wild Boys of the Road. He never grew and played jockeys on the take for a decade. He was inside Robbie the robot of Forbidden Planet fame but was fired for being drunk on the job. He appeared as late as the late-1950s in Have Gun Will Travel, his good looks decimated by drink. – Al Westerfield



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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


MDelvec952
 

I caught this film as well. The plot and story are typical of the time, as was the acting. That Ten Wheeler 2276 is similar to SP 2248 in service in Grapevine, Texas, today. The tank engine pulling the side-dumps on rickety track was terrific, as were the scenes showing the Santa Fe BX-0s. There were places were models were used in the wreck scenes.

What I always enjoy while viewing films of this era is that the context of life and railroading is real for that era (except for all of that make-up). This was filmed in 1924 when steam and that passenger consist was typical of the day, as were the freight cars. This story references World War I in about the same reference of memory as we would, say, the George "Dubya" presidency.

....Mike

-----Original Message-----
From: Al and Patricia Westerfield <westerfield@charter.net>
To: STMFC <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thu, Dec 15, 2011 11:33 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Roaring Rails




The film was more melodrama than railroad. However, there were several AT&SF Bx-Os in evidence. Also steam shovel and dump cars. It appeared that the film was shot both on SP and Sante Fe trackage. The view of the drivers was of a much earlier loco than the long shots. Road names were painted out on the tenders.

The boy, Frankie Darro became a silent star billed as “Darro”. He appeared in a famous film, Wild Boys of the Road. He never grew and played jockeys on the take for a decade. He was inside Robbie the robot of Forbidden Planet fame but was fired for being drunk on the job. He appeared as late as the late-1950s in Have Gun Will Travel, his good looks decimated by drink. – Al Westerfield

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Jim Betz
 

Hi,

Be careful about statements such as "those old movies show
what the 'real' railroading was like in those days". What
you are seeing may or may not be "real railroading" ...

It is just as possible that the producer/director/crew that
was doing the film back then made a decision based upon what
was 'available' (and how much it cost) then as it is today.
When the train in the scene is part of the background - you
can probably rely upon it. But if it is part of the actual
story line of the movie ... it may not be. However it was
common practice then ... and still is today ... to use some
"stock footage" to suplement the story line and so the train
in the scene is often "as real as it can get".
For instance - it was -very- common for a shot of an SP train
somewhere in the L.A. area to be used as an 'extra' for a story
that was placed on the East Coast (or vice versa).

Sometimes you can rely upon it. Sometimes you can't.

Geez, that kind of sounds a lot too much like whether or not
I'll get the garbage out to the curb for pickup on the right
day of the week!

- trying to sort the garbage from the "good old stuff" ... Jim

P.S. If you love trains - and movies - check out Yahoo group
"MovieTrains".


William Bryk <wmbryk@...>
 

I must admit that, while watching movies from the 1930s and 1940s with my
wife, I occasionally comment to her about how amazing it is to see a SP
Pacific hauling a passenger train into Chicago.

Regards,
wb

--
William Bryk
Attorney and Counsellor-at-Law
578 74th Street
Brooklyn, New York 11209-2614
Tel/Fax: (347) 497-5972


Tim O'Connor
 

I recall an episode of Star Trek where they "time travelled" to Detroit
and suddenly in one scene you can see mountains in the distance! Ya just
gotta love Hollywood. I don't think anyone in the biz has ever taken a
geography class.

On freight cars .. the scene in "It Happened One Night" when the motorcade
driving through New Jersey is blocked by a local Southern Pacific freight!
And an episode of The Fugitive TV show where he's hiding in a cave somewhere
in Pennsylvania, and catches a passing freight led by D&RGW F units winding
through a deep canyon...

Tim O'Connor

I must admit that, while watching movies from the 1930s and 1940s with my
wife, I occasionally comment to her about how amazing it is to see a SP
Pacific hauling a passenger train into Chicago.

Regards,
wb


Andy Carlson
 

Currently getting a lot of TV exposure, "White Christmas" has the Danny
Kaye/Bing Crosby characters riding from Florida to Vermont in both a Santa Fe
Warbonnet F unit powered train, and an SP Black Widow train.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA





________________________________
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sat, December 17, 2011 11:19:52 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Roaring Rails



I recall an episode of Star Trek where they "time travelled" to Detroit
and suddenly in one scene you can see mountains in the distance! Ya just
gotta love Hollywood. I don't think anyone in the biz has ever taken a
geography class.

On freight cars .. the scene in "It Happened One Night" when the motorcade
driving through New Jersey is blocked by a local Southern Pacific freight!
And an episode of The Fugitive TV show where he's hiding in a cave somewhere
in Pennsylvania, and catches a passing freight led by D&RGW F units winding
through a deep canyon...

Tim O'Connor

I must admit that, while watching movies from the 1930s and 1940s with my
wife, I occasionally comment to her about how amazing it is to see a SP
Pacific hauling a passenger train into Chicago.

Regards,
wb



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
I recall an episode of Star Trek where they "time travelled" to Detroit and suddenly in one scene you can see mountains in the distance! Ya just
gotta love Hollywood. I don't think anyone in the biz has ever taken a geography class.
Not true at all, Tim. In fact, there is typically a whole crew of "continuity" and "scene dressing" people, who are forever deciding what is important enough to do correctly and what isn't. That we train enthusiasts often find a train discrepancy just means it was regarded as not important, and you can be sure that an awful lot of the public would agree. And besides, it provides entertainment for us. <g>

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Tim O'Connor
 

And because a LOT of people rode trains back then, I'm sure many
of them noticed the goof. Kind of like if a contemporary film was
going to show someone flying out of O'Hare and then showed them
getting out of the taxi at Orlando International, which many people
will recognize.

Currently getting a lot of TV exposure, "White Christmas" has the Danny
Kaye/Bing Crosby characters riding from Florida to Vermont in both a Santa Fe
Warbonnet F unit powered train, and an SP Black Widow train.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Al and Patricia Westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

My favorite is the film Union Station where someone arrives in Los Angeles and then take a NYC elevated. – Al Westerfield

From: Tim O'Connor
Sent: Saturday, December 17, 2011 5:39 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Roaring Rails



And because a LOT of people rode trains back then, I'm sure many
of them noticed the goof. Kind of like if a contemporary film was
going to show someone flying out of O'Hare and then showed them
getting out of the taxi at Orlando International, which many people
will recognize.

Currently getting a lot of TV exposure, "White Christmas" has the Danny
Kaye/Bing Crosby characters riding from Florida to Vermont in both a Santa Fe
Warbonnet F unit powered train, and an SP Black Widow train.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Joel Holmes <lehighvalley@...>
 

Hi William,

There was the time Barney was returning to Mayberry on the train and it
showed him riding on either a ATSF or a UP train. (Can't remember which.)
Amazing that those trains could get so far east.

Joel

I must admit that, while watching movies from the 1930s and 1940s with my
wife, I occasionally comment to her about how amazing it is to see a SP
Pacific hauling a passenger train into Chicago.

Regards,
wb

--
William Bryk
Attorney and Counsellor-at-Law
578 74th Street
Brooklyn, New York 11209-2614
Tel/Fax: (347) 497-5972





tbarney2004
 

I personally find it funny in one scene in "Rudy" (which historically was just after list time ends in the mid-60s, but SHOULD have featured plenty of STMFCs in the form of hopper cars in scenes filmed at the steel mill) when Sean Aston as Rudy is walking out of the mill at end of shift while a string of Conrail hopper cars passes nearby.

Tim Barney

On 12/17/2011 6:48 PM, Al and Patricia Westerfield wrote:
My favorite is the film Union Station where someone arrives in Los Angeles and then take a NYC elevated. – Al Westerfield

From: Tim O'Connor
Sent: Saturday, December 17, 2011 5:39 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Roaring Rails



And because a LOT of people rode trains back then, I'm sure many
of them noticed the goof. Kind of like if a contemporary film was
going to show someone flying out of O'Hare and then showed them
getting out of the taxi at Orlando International, which many people
will recognize.

Currently getting a lot of TV exposure, "White Christmas" has the Danny
Kaye/Bing Crosby characters riding from Florida to Vermont in both a Santa Fe
Warbonnet F unit powered train, and an SP Black Widow train.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

Exactly. People just don't seem to realize that the movie is about the
*story*, not the scenery. I see similar discussions on the military
modeling groups whenever a war movie comes out. Everybody thinks their
little arcane corner of life should be presented with absolute accuracy,
regardless of cost, effort, or effect on the film.



If you want an idea of what these threads look like to normal people,
imagine reading . . .



"Did you see "The Red Caper"? It was OK, but, my gosh, don't the producers
know anything? It was supposed to be set in 1949, but the lead character
was wearing a Bulova "Cubic" watch - which wasn't released until 1956!! I
mean, it would be so easy to just ask someone who knows something about
watches! Instead they just show whatever stock jewelry they have in the
prop trailer - It's like they don't even care."



KL



Tim O'Connor wrote:
I recall an episode of Star Trek where they "time travelled" to
Detroit and suddenly in one scene you can see mountains in the
distance! Ya just
gotta love Hollywood. I don't think anyone in the biz has ever taken
a geography class.
Not true at all, Tim. In fact, there is typically a whole crew
of "continuity" and "scene dressing" people, who are forever deciding
what is important enough to do correctly and what isn't. That we train
enthusiasts often find a train discrepancy just means it was regarded
as not important, and you can be sure that an awful lot of the public
would agree. And besides, it provides entertainment for us. <g>


William Bryk <wmbryk@...>
 

Exactly. I derive amusement, not contempt, from seeing these gliches. I
wonder too whether I would do any better if I worked in Hollywood and had
to dress the set with airplanes or automobiles, of which I don't know
much. Trains, yes; airplanes, not necessarily.

Regards,
William Bryk

On Sat, Dec 17, 2011 at 10:30 PM, Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@verizon.net> wrote:

**


Exactly. People just don't seem to realize that the movie is about the
*story*, not the scenery. I see similar discussions on the military
modeling groups whenever a war movie comes out. Everybody thinks their
little arcane corner of life should be presented with absolute accuracy,
regardless of cost, effort, or effect on the film.

If you want an idea of what these threads look like to normal people,
imagine reading . . .

"Did you see "The Red Caper"? It was OK, but, my gosh, don't the producers
know anything? It was supposed to be set in 1949, but the lead character
was wearing a Bulova "Cubic" watch - which wasn't released until 1956!! I
mean, it would be so easy to just ask someone who knows something about
watches! Instead they just show whatever stock jewelry they have in the
prop trailer - It's like they don't even care."

KL

Tim O'Connor wrote:
I recall an episode of Star Trek where they "time travelled" to
Detroit and suddenly in one scene you can see mountains in the
distance! Ya just
gotta love Hollywood. I don't think anyone in the biz has ever taken
a geography class.
Not true at all, Tim. In fact, there is typically a whole crew
of "continuity" and "scene dressing" people, who are forever deciding
what is important enough to do correctly and what isn't. That we train
enthusiasts often find a train discrepancy just means it was regarded
as not important, and you can be sure that an awful lot of the public
would agree. And besides, it provides entertainment for us. <g>







--
William Bryk
Attorney and Counsellor-at-Law
578 74th Street
Brooklyn, New York 11209-2614
Tel/Fax: (347) 497-5972


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Kurt Laughlin wrote:
If you want an idea of what these threads look like to normal people, imagine reading . . .

"Did you see "The Red Caper"? It was OK, but, my gosh, don't the producers know anything? It was supposed to be set in 1949, but the lead character
was wearing a Bulova "Cubic" watch - which wasn't released until 1956!! I mean, it would be so easy to just ask someone who knows something about
watches! Instead they just show whatever stock jewelry they have in the prop trailer - It's like they don't even care."
Excellently put, Kurt. "Nuf said.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


cj riley <cjriley42@...>
 

I have to relate a story from Craig Thorpe, noted railroad artist, who did a fund raising  painting for the restoration of the Snoqualmie depot in Wa.  He researched the depot colors, the loco and passenger cars, the dairy truck name and myriad details to get them right. At the ceremony for the painting, an elderly lady approached him and asked about the year represented. He named the year with confidence that all was correct, but she pointed the Irish Setter in the scene was a breed unknown in the US until several years later. Always a rivet counter.

 
CJ Riley
Bainbridge Island WA


________________________________

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

cj riley wrote:
I have to relate a story from Craig Thorpe, noted railroad artist, who did a fund raising painting for the restoration of the Snoqualmie depot in Wa. He researched the depot colors, the loco and passenger cars, the dairy truck name and myriad details to get them right. At the ceremony for the painting, an elderly lady approached him and asked about the year represented. He named the year with confidence that all was correct, but she pointed the Irish Setter in the scene was a breed unknown in the US until several years later. Always a rivet counter.
Indeed. Next we will have to revive the Cavendish banana story (not).

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Steve Haas
 

<<I have to relate a story from Craig Thorpe, noted railroad artist, who did
a fund raising  painting for the restoration of the Snoqualmie depot in Wa. 
He researched the depot colors, the loco and passenger cars, the dairy truck
name and myriad details to get them right. At the ceremony for the painting,
an elderly lady approached him and asked about the year represented. He
named the year with confidence that all was correct, but she pointed the
Irish Setter in the scene was a breed unknown in the US until several years
later. Always a rivet counter.>>

T'is how we learn.

Steve Haas
Snoqualmie, WA


Scott Pitzer
 

Kurt Laughlin wrote:
If you want an idea of what these threads look like to normal
people
=======================
I thought there was a system in place to prevent normal people from seeing these threads!
Scott Pitzer


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]