In praise of 0.005 styrene


Bill Welch
 

I have been busy tweaking and improving some details on two Central
of Georgia ventilated boxcars which has meant frequently consulting
the several photos I have of these cars. Early on I noticed there is
a metal flashing extending from doorstop to doorstop covering the
tops of the two doors. The bottom portion of this flashing is creased
and bent out allowing it to cover the tops of the doors. This is the
kind of detail that needs a very thin material to model it. While I
have been attending to the other enhancements, I have been going over
in my head how I could model this flashing and attach it. Initially I
was going to use sheet brass as I had on a couple of TN&O SS boxcars
w/Allen doors, but I was having difficulty sorting out how to mount
it and have it project out far enough to cover the tops of the doors.

Despite constantly looking at the model I had not noticed there was
essentially a groove under the roof eve and above the side of the car
where as it turns out I could fit .020 x .030 styrene strip.
Immediately I realized I could use Evergreen 0.005 styrene sheeting
and I started making the parts this morning and I think the results
will be satisfying. The bent out portion is especially satisfying.
Like brass sheeting it also possible damage the edges and ends of the
thin styrene to model what happened on the real cars.

This just reminds me one more time how valuable this Evergreen
product is. It is something I use for any number things--veneers,
batten strips and gusset plates are three that immediately come to
mind. Shimming is obvious. It does require great care when using
Testers or similar solvents because it is so thin and it can be
distorted easily by these. What I do is wick the Testers into the
joint and immediately blow on it. Perhaps I should explain what I
mean by using it for veneering. On resin kits where there are
sometimes very small parts, and rather than ACCing these directly to
wherever they go, I will ACC the small part to thin styrene and ACC a
small bit of the same styrene to the appropriate location on the
model. If I make a mistake locating this bit of styrene, I can easily
lift it off and try again. Then I can use Testers to locate the small
detail part, positioning just right since the Testers takes time to
set up. This works great with items like door stops, door supports etc.

In case you have never used this product, I strongly suggest you pick
some up and experiment with it.
Bill Welch


Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

Thanks Bill...

I don't use .005" styrene that often but when I do, I use CA to bond
it...the MEK I use for styrene is just too "hot".

Jack


Gary Roe
 

On Behalf Of Bill Welch

This just reminds me one more time how valuable this Evergreen
product is.

Bill Welch


Bill,

I am grateful for ALL of the Evergreen products, and would be totally lost
without them. I hope they never go away.

gary roe
quincy, illinois


Bill Welch
 

Jack, I totally get it. That is why I prefer Testers, which has some sort of retarder in it, making it more tame.

Bill

--- In STMFC@..., "Jack Burgess" <jack@...> wrote:

Thanks Bill...

I don't use .005" styrene that often but when I do, I use CA to bond
it...the MEK I use for styrene is just too "hot".

Jack


jerryglow2
 

The clear .005 product doesn't seem to disolve as readily with solvent application.

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@..., "Jack Burgess" <jack@...> wrote:

Thanks Bill...

I don't use .005" styrene that often but when I do, I use CA to bond
it...the MEK I use for styrene is just too "hot".

Jack


Tim O'Connor
 

I only wish we could get .003 sheet, in BLACK styrene. :-)

But I am a huge fan of Evergreen including the .005 sheet.

Ever use aluminum foil for parts? I made some door stops for
a stock car from HVAC 'sticky' aluminum foil. I didn't have
to glue the base to the car, just used the stick-um that came
with it. They've never failed, and the car is over 10 yrs old.
One nice thing about the foil is it that it can be cut very
precisely with scissors, or a paper cutter.

Tim O'Connor


Aley, Jeff A
 

I haven't tried it on models, but I have a friend who uses HVAC foil tape to seal up gaps in the benchwork (e.g. between pieces of plywood) before adding ground cover.

How thick is the foil? I don't have any on-hand to measure.

Regards,

-Jeff


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Thursday, December 22, 2011 10:53 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] In praise of 0.005 styrene



I only wish we could get .003 sheet, in BLACK styrene. :-)

But I am a huge fan of Evergreen including the .005 sheet.

Ever use aluminum foil for parts? I made some door stops for
a stock car from HVAC 'sticky' aluminum foil. I didn't have
to glue the base to the car, just used the stick-um that came
with it. They've never failed, and the car is over 10 yrs old.
One nice thing about the foil is it that it can be cut very
precisely with scissors, or a paper cutter.

Tim O'Connor


Tim O'Connor
 

Jeff

It's definitely thicker than "heavy duty" kitchen foil, but I've
never tried to measure the thickness. I'm sure it is much less than
.005. I have some soft formable foil (like the kind that came with
the Sunshine Greenville gondola kit to form the ends) and that also
seems thicker than the HVAC foil.

Tim

I haven't tried it on models, but I have a friend who uses HVAC foil tape to seal up gaps in the benchwork (e.g. between pieces of plywood) before adding ground cover.

How thick is the foil? I don't have any on-hand to measure.

Regards,

-Jeff


Andy Carlson
 

Jack Spencer gets great results with varying thicknesses of Mylar. .003" -.006"
sheets are commonly used by him.

Myself, I like using the RC item self-adhesive "Monocote Trim", not to be
confused with heat-shrinking Monokote. The trim is .003" plastic film with a
peel-off paper backing, and is very good at taking rivet impressions. Comes in
almost any color imagined, except light gray was not available when I made my
last purchase-I settled for white.


I have had excellent results bonding .005" styrene to styrene by applying small
amounts of Testors solvent glue to the area of the field with which you intend
to place the .005" overlay. Wait for the solvent to flash off, then place your
thin .005" plastic piece in place. The amount of residual solvent makes an
excellent bond. Doesn't fall off, even when used for patterns and removed from
the mold.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA




________________________________
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thu, December 22, 2011 10:52:44 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] In praise of 0.005 styrene



I only wish we could get .003 sheet, in BLACK styrene. :-)

But I am a huge fan of Evergreen including the .005 sheet.

Ever use aluminum foil for parts? I made some door stops for
a stock car from HVAC 'sticky' aluminum foil. I didn't have
to glue the base to the car, just used the stick-um that came
with it. They've never failed, and the car is over 10 yrs old.
One nice thing about the foil is it that it can be cut very
precisely with scissors, or a paper cutter.

Tim O'Connor


Todd Horton
 

Has anyone tred to use this for patch panels on X29's? Sound like if this is available in clear then you  might be able to "fix" an early decorated Red Caboose model without repainting.  Todd Horton

From: Andy Carlson <midcentury@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, December 22, 2011 2:48 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] In praise of 0.005 styrene


 
Jack Spencer gets great results with varying thicknesses of Mylar. .003" -.006"
sheets are commonly used by him.

Myself, I like using the RC item self-adhesive "Monocote Trim", not to be
confused with heat-shrinking Monokote. The trim is .003" plastic film with a
peel-off paper backing, and is very good at taking rivet impressions. Comes in
almost any color imagined, except light gray was not available when I made my
last purchase-I settled for white.

I have had excellent results bonding .005" styrene to styrene by applying small
amounts of Testors solvent glue to the area of the field with which you intend
to place the .005" overlay. Wait for the solvent to flash off, then place your
thin .005" plastic piece in place. The amount of residual solvent makes an
excellent bond. Doesn't fall off, even when used for patterns and removed from
the mold.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

________________________________
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thu, December 22, 2011 10:52:44 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] In praise of 0.005 styrene

I only wish we could get .003 sheet, in BLACK styrene. :-)

But I am a huge fan of Evergreen including the .005 sheet.

Ever use aluminum foil for parts? I made some door stops for
a stock car from HVAC 'sticky' aluminum foil. I didn't have
to glue the base to the car, just used the stick-um that came
with it. They've never failed, and the car is over 10 yrs old.
One nice thing about the foil is it that it can be cut very
precisely with scissors, or a paper cutter.

Tim O'Connor






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Bill Welch
 

Todd:

While I think it could be burnished successfully to show the rivets on the surface, I would think whatever adhiseve is used would spoil the look. I would think multiple layers of clear decal film might work better. I am thinking of trying multiple layers of decal film to model the repairs made to FGE's ex-R7 reefer's diagonal and vertical bracing albeit, before I paint them.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., Todd Horton <toddchorton@...> wrote:

Has anyone tred to use this for patch panels on X29's? Sound like if this is available in clear then you  might be able to "fix" an early decorated Red Caboose model without repainting.  Todd Horton

From: Andy Carlson <midcentury@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, December 22, 2011 2:48 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] In praise of 0.005 styrene


 
Jack Spencer gets great results with varying thicknesses of Mylar. .003" -.006"
sheets are commonly used by him.

Myself, I like using the RC item self-adhesive "Monocote Trim", not to be
confused with heat-shrinking Monokote. The trim is .003" plastic film with a
peel-off paper backing, and is very good at taking rivet impressions. Comes in
almost any color imagined, except light gray was not available when I made my
last purchase-I settled for white.

I have had excellent results bonding .005" styrene to styrene by applying small
amounts of Testors solvent glue to the area of the field with which you intend
to place the .005" overlay. Wait for the solvent to flash off, then place your
thin .005" plastic piece in place. The amount of residual solvent makes an
excellent bond. Doesn't fall off, even when used for patterns and removed from
the mold.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

________________________________
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thu, December 22, 2011 10:52:44 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] In praise of 0.005 styrene

I only wish we could get .003 sheet, in BLACK styrene. :-)

But I am a huge fan of Evergreen including the .005 sheet.

Ever use aluminum foil for parts? I made some door stops for
a stock car from HVAC 'sticky' aluminum foil. I didn't have
to glue the base to the car, just used the stick-um that came
with it. They've never failed, and the car is over 10 yrs old.
One nice thing about the foil is it that it can be cut very
precisely with scissors, or a paper cutter.

Tim O'Connor

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Chad Boas
 

I used it on the sides of my Wabash buisness car #400. I used evergreen metal siding as the base and used a blunt burnishing tool to push it into the cracks. Gives it a good fluted siding look. I have brought this car to Naperville a few times.
Chad Boas

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


I only wish we could get .003 sheet, in BLACK styrene. :-)

But I am a huge fan of Evergreen including the .005 sheet.

Ever use aluminum foil for parts? I made some door stops for
a stock car from HVAC 'sticky' aluminum foil. I didn't have
to glue the base to the car, just used the stick-um that came
with it. They've never failed, and the car is over 10 yrs old.
One nice thing about the foil is it that it can be cut very
precisely with scissors, or a paper cutter.

Tim O'Connor


Greg Martin
 

_toddchorton@... (mailto:toddchorton@...) writes:


Has anyone tried to use this for patch panels on X29's? Sound like if this
is available in clear then you might be able to "fix" an early decorated
Red Caboose model without repainting. Todd Horton


Todd,

If you have a decorated Red Caboose X29 you would like to simulate the
patch panels on why not just use a black line and an orange line drawn closely
parallel on the side with colored pencils? Patch panels weren't applied
over a panel they were a replacement panel.

Greg Martin



Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean