Scalecoat paint


Bill Lane
 

For over 20 years I have used Scalecoat for the car color and Floquil
weathering. I lost track of how many models I have painted - 99% of which
were brass - but it is well over 500. Yesterday I started painting some O
Scale boxcars in Floquil because that is what I was told to do. The cars
were freshly blasted in my booth. Since I am decaling I mixed 2 bottles of
paint in with 1 bottle of high gloss. Floquil does NOT COVER especially in
the hard corners. I sprayed and sprayed waiting for it to build and cover
but it did not - at least to my satisfaction. I was going to paint, bake and
paint again to get good coverage when I stopped saying this is just wrong.
After some campaigning I was able to switch to Scalecoat and completed
painting the cars to an excellent finish.



The best thing I could say about the Floquil paint is it came off in the
blast booth in record time - much easier than the original clear coat on the
cars! I know that there are some other "newer" brands some of which I have
also recently used for the first time.



But for me I will stick to Scalecoat. It just works! I have goofed that the
last bottle of Scalecoat will be pried from my cold dead hands!



Thank You,
Bill Lane

Modeling the Mighty Pennsy & PRSL in 1957 in S Scale since 1988

See my finished models at:
<http://www.lanestrains.com/> http://www.lanestrains.com
Look at what has been made in PRR in S Scale!

Custom Train Parts Design
<http://www.lanestrains.com/SolidWorks_Modeling.htm>
http://www.lanestrains.com/SolidWorks_Modeling.htm

PRR Builders Photos Bought, Sold & Traded
(Trading is MUCH preferred)
<http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRphotos.xls>
http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRphotos.xls

***Join the PRR T&HS***
The other members are not ALL like me!
<http://www.prrths.com/> http://www.prrths.com
<http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRTHS_Application.pdf>
http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRTHS_Application.pdf

Join the Pennsylvania Reading Seashore Lines Historical Society
It's FREE to join! <http://www.prslhs.com/> http://www.prslhs.com
Preserving The Memory Of The PRSL


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Bill Lane wrote:
For over 20 years I have used Scalecoat for the car color and Floquil weathering. I lost track of how many models I have painted - 99% of which were brass - but it is well over 500. Yesterday I started painting some O Scale boxcars in Floquil . . . I mixed 2 bottles of paint in with 1 bottle of high gloss.
Bill, I would NEVER use anywhere near this much gloss. It's just diluting the paint. No wonder you had problems. The simplest approach would have been to just spray the Floquil as normal, and add a very light coat of gloss (with the airbrush). If you want one coat, I would not add more than 10 percent gloss, probably less. Lots of us have used Floquil with considerable success for as many years as you have used Scalecoat. But you have to use it in a way that will work.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Marcelo Lordeiro <mrcustom@...>
 

I had good results with Floquil mixing 5% crystal cote , 5% retarder , 20 to 30% Diosol and the paint . Them a coat of crystal cote to apply the decals.

When I have the Scalecoat color available is the one I use.


Marcelo Lordeiro


Bill Lane wrote:

For over 20 years I have used Scalecoat for the car color and
Floquil weathering. I lost track of how many models I have painted
- 99% of which were brass - but it is well over 500. Yesterday I
started painting some O Scale boxcars in Floquil . . . I mixed 2
bottles of paint in with 1 bottle of high gloss.


Tim O'Connor
 

Scalecoat is best for brass, but I agree with Tony about the mix. I add
Crystal Coat to Floquil when I'm not using it for weathering -- less than
10% I think. And I add a few drops of retarder just to help with flow. Also I
never pour Floquil back in the bottle, nor Scalecoat, nor acrylics.
Accupaint is the only totally forgiving paint in this regard.

Tim O'Connor

----- Original Message -----
From: "Anthony Thompson" <thompson@signaturepress.com>

For over 20 years I have used Scalecoat for the car color and
Floquil weathering. I lost track of how many models I have painted
- 99% of which were brass - but it is well over 500. Yesterday I
started painting some O Scale boxcars in Floquil . . . I mixed 2
bottles of paint in with 1 bottle of high gloss.
Bill, I would NEVER use anywhere near this much gloss. It's
just diluting the paint. No wonder you had problems. The simplest
approach would have been to just spray the Floquil as normal, and add
a very light coat of gloss (with the airbrush). If you want one coat,
I would not add more than 10 percent gloss, probably less. Lots of us
have used Floquil with considerable success for as many years as you
have used Scalecoat. But you have to use it in a way that will work.

Tony Thompson


Pierre <pierre.oliver@...>
 

I too am a big fan of Scalecoat paint. It is my preferred paint to use. It covers well and has never let me down.
The ratio Bill used with the gloss is rather over the top. Makes me wonder why you wouldn't paint the car with Floquil and then gloss coat it after.
As much as I like the selection of colors from Floquil, ever since it was changed into an enamel there have been issues with that paint. I have had coverage issues with both resin and brass. It's an inconsistent problem to boot. One day it works the next it's a raging pile of poo.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Lane" <bill@...> wrote:

For over 20 years I have used Scalecoat for the car color and Floquil
weathering. I lost track of how many models I have painted - 99% of which
were brass - but it is well over 500. Yesterday I started painting some O
Scale boxcars in Floquil because that is what I was told to do. The cars
were freshly blasted in my booth. Since I am decaling I mixed 2 bottles of
paint in with 1 bottle of high gloss. Floquil does NOT COVER especially in
the hard corners. I sprayed and sprayed waiting for it to build and cover
but it did not - at least to my satisfaction. I was going to paint, bake and
paint again to get good coverage when I stopped saying this is just wrong.
After some campaigning I was able to switch to Scalecoat and completed
painting the cars to an excellent finish.



The best thing I could say about the Floquil paint is it came off in the
blast booth in record time - much easier than the original clear coat on the
cars! I know that there are some other "newer" brands some of which I have
also recently used for the first time.



But for me I will stick to Scalecoat. It just works! I have goofed that the
last bottle of Scalecoat will be pried from my cold dead hands!



Thank You,
Bill Lane

Modeling the Mighty Pennsy & PRSL in 1957 in S Scale since 1988

See my finished models at:
<http://www.lanestrains.com/> http://www.lanestrains.com
Look at what has been made in PRR in S Scale!

Custom Train Parts Design
<http://www.lanestrains.com/SolidWorks_Modeling.htm>
http://www.lanestrains.com/SolidWorks_Modeling.htm

PRR Builders Photos Bought, Sold & Traded
(Trading is MUCH preferred)
<http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRphotos.xls>
http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRphotos.xls

***Join the PRR T&HS***
The other members are not ALL like me!
<http://www.prrths.com/> http://www.prrths.com
<http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRTHS_Application.pdf>
http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRTHS_Application.pdf

Join the Pennsylvania Reading Seashore Lines Historical Society
It's FREE to join! <http://www.prslhs.com/> http://www.prslhs.com
Preserving The Memory Of The PRSL





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


naptownprr
 

I also prefer Scalecoat because it dries glossy. If I do use Floquil, I go through two steps: first the Floquil flat, and after it has dried for a day or two, then a coat of gloss for decals.

Jim

Quoting Pierre <pierre.oliver@start.ca>:

I too am a big fan of Scalecoat paint. It is my preferred paint to
use. It covers well and has never let me down.
The ratio Bill used with the gloss is rather over the top. Makes me
wonder why you wouldn't paint the car with Floquil and then gloss
coat it after.
As much as I like the selection of colors from Floquil, ever since it
was changed into an enamel there have been issues with that paint. I
have had coverage issues with both resin and brass. It's an
inconsistent problem to boot. One day it works the next it's a raging
pile of poo.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Lane" <bill@...> wrote:

For over 20 years I have used Scalecoat for the car color and Floquil
weathering. I lost track of how many models I have painted - 99% of which
were brass - but it is well over 500. Yesterday I started painting some O
Scale boxcars in Floquil because that is what I was told to do. The cars
were freshly blasted in my booth. Since I am decaling I mixed 2 bottles of
paint in with 1 bottle of high gloss. Floquil does NOT COVER especially in
the hard corners. I sprayed and sprayed waiting for it to build and cover
but it did not - at least to my satisfaction. I was going to paint, bake and
paint again to get good coverage when I stopped saying this is just wrong.
After some campaigning I was able to switch to Scalecoat and completed
painting the cars to an excellent finish.



The best thing I could say about the Floquil paint is it came off in the
blast booth in record time - much easier than the original clear coat on the
cars! I know that there are some other "newer" brands some of which I have
also recently used for the first time.



But for me I will stick to Scalecoat. It just works! I have goofed that the
last bottle of Scalecoat will be pried from my cold dead hands!



Thank You,
Bill Lane

Modeling the Mighty Pennsy & PRSL in 1957 in S Scale since 1988

See my finished models at:
<http://www.lanestrains.com/> http://www.lanestrains.com
Look at what has been made in PRR in S Scale!

Custom Train Parts Design
<http://www.lanestrains.com/SolidWorks_Modeling.htm>
http://www.lanestrains.com/SolidWorks_Modeling.htm

PRR Builders Photos Bought, Sold & Traded
(Trading is MUCH preferred)
<http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRphotos.xls>
http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRphotos.xls

***Join the PRR T&HS***
The other members are not ALL like me!
<http://www.prrths.com/> http://www.prrths.com
<http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRTHS_Application.pdf>
http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRTHS_Application.pdf

Join the Pennsylvania Reading Seashore Lines Historical Society
It's FREE to join! <http://www.prslhs.com/> http://www.prslhs.com
Preserving The Memory Of The PRSL







Armand Premo
 

Accupaint? Where does one find it?Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: timboconnor@comcast.net
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, April 05, 2012 2:32 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Scalecoat paint




Scalecoat is best for brass, but I agree with Tony about the mix. I add
Crystal Coat to Floquil when I'm not using it for weathering -- less than
10% I think. And I add a few drops of retarder just to help with flow. Also I
never pour Floquil back in the bottle, nor Scalecoat, nor acrylics.
Accupaint is the only totally forgiving paint in this regard.

Tim O'Connor

----- Original Message -----
From: "Anthony Thompson" <thompson@signaturepress.com>

> For over 20 years I have used Scalecoat for the car color and
> Floquil weathering. I lost track of how many models I have painted
> - 99% of which were brass - but it is well over 500. Yesterday I
> started painting some O Scale boxcars in Floquil . . . I mixed 2
> bottles of paint in with 1 bottle of high gloss.

Bill, I would NEVER use anywhere near this much gloss. It's
just diluting the paint. No wonder you had problems. The simplest
approach would have been to just spray the Floquil as normal, and add
a very light coat of gloss (with the airbrush). If you want one coat,
I would not add more than 10 percent gloss, probably less. Lots of us
have used Floquil with considerable success for as many years as you
have used Scalecoat. But you have to use it in a way that will work.

Tony Thompson


Andy Harman
 

At 10:41 AM 4/5/2012 -0400, you wrote:
But for me I will stick to Scalecoat. It just works! I have goofed that the
last bottle of Scalecoat will be pried from my cold dead hands!
I will use Scalecoat every time as long as the color is available. I was an exclusive Floquil guy for many years, but gradually changed over. The problem I have now with Floquil is that they have changed all of the colors drastically. Roof brown for instance, is now more gray than brown and there is no equivalent dark rusty brown anymore. Fortunately one LHS *gave* me three old bottles of "real" roof brown, they didn't charge me because it was 15 year old stock and they weren't sure if it was still usable... it is. And grimy black, which used to be a great and unique color with a slight yellow/green tinge and a twinkle is now just another shade of dark gray. I have the old bottles around to prove it.

I also think they did something to their caboose red, which used to be bright red but is now much darker and duller. But that happened in the 80s, before current ownership and all of the other mangling of the colors.

Andy


Andy Harman
 

At 06:51 PM 4/5/2012 +0000, you wrote:
I too am a big fan of Scalecoat paint. It is my preferred paint to use. It covers well and has never let me down.
Last night I supervised my wife painting a resin tank car white - with Scalecoat II. It's only the second thing she has ever airbrushed, model-wise. Didn't have to worry too much about coverage since the resin itself is off-white, just a few gray parts and etchings to deal with. Once she got a feel for it, she did fine. She has mainly painted things with spray cans, so I had to convince her she could get closer safely. Her prior airbrushing experience was T-shirts and cakes which is a whole different thing than laying down a solid color onto many nooks and crannies.

The only time I ever botched a paint job with Scalecoat was when I accidentally thinned it with Floquil airbrush thinner. That was not a good thing. I use generic thinner for clean-up, but for thinning paint I always use the brand that matches the paint. It's a lot more expensive but not exactly a major expense. I just emptied a quart can of Scalecoat II thinner last night. I bought a new can to replace it because it was getting low.. 8 years ago. In terms of my total modeling budget, brand name paint thinner has to be in the bottom 1% of expenditure.

Andy


Andy Harman
 

At 03:17 PM 4/5/2012 -0400, you wrote:
I also prefer Scalecoat because it dries glossy. If I do use Floquil,
I go through two steps: first the Floquil flat, and after it has dried
for a day or two, then a coat of gloss for decals.
When I painted almost exclusively with Floquil, I often would decal right onto the flat surface. Using Solvaset I usually got away with it too. I eventually went with the Microscale system using their gloss and flat, but stopped using their flat when they stopped producing that wonderful amber/benzene stuff in the late 70s. I now use Scalecoat for pretty much everything, and I have an ever-changing mix of Testors dull+gloss that I use for a final finish or a base for weathering.

Andy


Pierre <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Armand,
I believe that Accupaint is now marketed as Trucolor.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "armprem2" <armprem2@...> wrote:

Accupaint? Where does one find it?Armand Premo
----- Original Message -----


Armand Premo
 

Thank you Pierre,.Armand Premo----- Original Message -----
From: Pierre
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, April 05, 2012 7:36 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Scalecoat paint



Armand,
I believe that Accupaint is now marketed as Trucolor.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "armprem2" <armprem2@...> wrote:
>
> Accupaint? Where does one find it?Armand Premo
> ----- Original Message -----
>


PennsyNut <pennsynut@...>
 

On 5,04 2012 18:55 PM, armprem2 wrote:

Thank you Pierre,.Armand Premo----- Original Message -----
From: Pierre
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, April 05, 2012 7:36 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Scalecoat paint

Armand,
I believe that Accupaint is now marketed as Trucolor.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>,
"armprem2" <armprem2@...> wrote:

Accupaint? Where does one find it?Armand Premo
FYI I had used Accupaint to paint my PRR locos "Brunswick Green" until I
learned that even that color was not correct. I switched to using
others. But I also only painted by brush. And Accupaint was good for
that, leaving no brush marks. Since I have never sprayed, I can not say
what good Accupaint is for that. Also, after painting, I sprayed with a
spray can, Dull Cote. That seemed to protect the loco from handling and
the color stayed on fairly well. This is/was years ago. Not sure what
Trucolor will be like.
May I ask? Give it a try and let us all know how it turns out.
Morgan Bilbo Ferroequinologist SPF PRRTHS #1204


Tim O'Connor
 

FYI I had used Accupaint to paint my PRR locos "Brunswick Green"
> until I learned that even that color was not correct.

George found that no one would buy real DGLE. He showed me the
glass PRR drift plate painted DGLE -- in a brightly lit room, to
my eyes, it looked BLACK as ebony. Only in the full force of real
sunlight does it look green.

Tim O'Connor


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
George found that no one would buy real DGLE. He showed me the glass PRR drift plate painted DGLE -- in a brightly lit room, to my eyes, it looked BLACK as ebony. Only in the full force of real sunlight does it look green.
And then not VERY green. A Pittsburgh modeler I knew, who was very familiar with Pennsy steam, said "If the MODEL looks green, it's way too green." Bruce Smith may wish to comment, but I bet even the most serious PRR color maven would hesitate to paint their locomotives BLACK.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


tmolsen@...
 

Back in the mid-60s when Scalecoat first came out DGLE was not yet available so we made our own. Since we needed a lot of it to spread around between five of us, we mixed four bottles of engine black to one bottle of pullman green. The result was a good match for DGLE.

To prove we hAd a good match, we painted a locomotive and took it up to Strasburg PA to see if it matched the PRR steam locomotives that had just arrived from the Juniata Shops in Altoona that had been completely refurbished. The five engines (Class M1b 4-8-2, G5s 4-6-0, H10s 2-8-0, H6sb 2-8-0, and a E7s 4-4-2 (masquerading as an E-2) were the first engines sent down to Strasburg to eventully become part of the yet to be built State Railroad Museum.

We got there in mid-morning just after it had rained and the sun had just came out. Our version of DGLE was a perfect match for the DGLE that Juniata had painted those engines.

Unfortunately, we could never use the same 4-1 formula today as the Pullman Green that Scalecoat had originally marketed has changed color and is not the same hue as the original formula used originally. When they took the lead binder out of the paint, the durability of the paint suffered. It is not quite the same, but is still the best stuff out there and is my favorite to use.

The PRR freight car color and the Tuscan Red has changed also. They are both darker than the the original Scalecoat formulas, although they reflect the colors used by the railroad in the later '50s and '60s. This was to be expected as the paints changed due to the use of synthetic pigments over the years.

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@udel.edu


tmolsen@...
 

Tim,

That is just how true DGLE looks. It appears to be black, but in bright sunlight up close you can see that it is a very dark green. That was what was so striking to me when I saw those steam engines at Strasburg in 1965. Up to that time, the only DGLE locos that I had seen were the GG1 electrics.

The sky had just cleared after the rain and the sunlight was very bright and when you looked at those engines from an angle in the sun, you could see the green hue. It was not uncommon for people to mistake it for black.

Tom Olsen
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479


derrell
 

A Quart of green paint thrown (I visualized that this included the can and all) into a 55 gal. drum of Black. That was how DGLC was described to me.

On the other hand we split the spectrum to the inth degree to get our model colors exact, then put them under artificial light and run our steam engines on elect-Triciteeee....

Good Gawd. I think maybe we all need a good diversion like maybe a weenie roast or a hay-fever ride!

Square dancing anyone?

Derrell Poole


Bruce Smith
 

Way back when I was still wet behind the ears (20 years ago?), a PRR modeler told me that they painted all their steam with Floquil Grimy Black. I was AGHAST! "Why sir", I asked, "don't you know that PRR steam locos were painted DGLE(DGLP)?" He smiled and said, "of course", and proceeded to explain that the slight green tinge to grimy black, combined with the weathered black produced an almost perfect basis for DGLE. Of course, as noted so recently here, grimy black no longer has this green overtone and is really just a dark grey now.

As Greg Martin taught me the following for DGLE - if it looks green, it is too green and if it looks black, it is too black. The true test for such a dark, dark green is to place it next to a true black. When you do that, you can readily see the difference. This is notable in many photos of PRR motive power, as the frames, trucks, etc were painted black.

But alas, we stray from freight cars, as to the best of my knowledge, none were painted in such a shade, and only a few Pullmans got this color paint (and were then assigned to the NYC!)


Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/


"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."

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On Apr 5, 2012, at 11:36 PM, Anthony Thompson wrote:
And then not VERY green. A Pittsburgh modeler I knew, who was
very familiar with Pennsy steam, said "If the MODEL looks green, it's
way too green." Bruce Smith may wish to comment, but I bet even the
most serious PRR color maven would hesitate to paint their locomotives
BLACK.


Andy Harman
 

At 09:36 PM 4/5/2012 -0700, you wrote:

And then not VERY green. A Pittsburgh modeler I knew, who was
very familiar with Pennsy steam, said "If the MODEL looks green, it's
way too green."
I think Athearn got it right on their first run of Genesis F units. Everything else looks too green.

Andy