Modeling truss rods


Joe Bower <jnbower1@...>
 

Group: Guess what! I just found this message in my "never sent Drafts
folder". I recall the subject was pretty thoroughly covered, but
nevertheless, for what it may be worth, here are my thoughts on the subject.
Joe Bower



Group: I have built many H.O. Scale wood, resin, and scratch-built styrene
old time freight cars using mono-filament, and basically as described by
O.Fenton Wells method #2 (1-29-'11 email). I prefer mono-filament since it
won't be bent out of shape as frequently occurs with wire truss rods.



I mask the turnbuckles so the unpainted mono-filament appears to be open in
the center of the turnbuckle. I use one length of mono-filament, lacing it
down thru the first outboard hole in the floor, sliding on a turn buckle,
temporarily passing the filament over the needle beams, (NOT over the queen
posts), then up thru the floor. Repeat lacing back and forth for each
additional truss rod. Since both ends of the filament are still free, it is
easy to uniformly adjust the truss rods to eliminate any slack, but still
not lifted onto the queen posts. Weave the two ends of the filament spirally
around each other across the floor, and temporarily lift the truss rods onto
the queen posts to check for the desired final tension, release back down to
the needle beam position. Tie off each end with an overhand knot at the
outboard edges. Secure with ACC or Goo. Clip off the excess lengths.



Very Important: For Box, Reefer and Gondola Cars proceed next to install the
Sides and Ends before lifting the truss rods onto the queen posts to prevent
humping up the car floor. Since Flat Cars have no Sides to stiffen the
floor, be very careful with the amount of final tension of the rods when
lifted onto the Queen Posts to prevent humping up the floor.



Joe Bower

.


al_brown03
 

Mm ... truss rods are under tension. Therefore, they're taut. I have trouble getting monofilament to stay taut; this may be my fault, but therefore I prefer wire. Since one wants stiffness, I prefer phosphor bronze wire to brass for use in truss rods.

YMMV --

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@..., "Joe Bower" <jnbower1@...> wrote:

Group: Guess what! I just found this message in my "never sent Drafts
folder". I recall the subject was pretty thoroughly covered, but
nevertheless, for what it may be worth, here are my thoughts on the subject.
Joe Bower



Group: I have built many H.O. Scale wood, resin, and scratch-built styrene
old time freight cars using mono-filament, and basically as described by
O.Fenton Wells method #2 (1-29-'11 email). I prefer mono-filament since it
won't be bent out of shape as frequently occurs with wire truss rods.



I mask the turnbuckles so the unpainted mono-filament appears to be open in
the center of the turnbuckle. I use one length of mono-filament, lacing it
down thru the first outboard hole in the floor, sliding on a turn buckle,
temporarily passing the filament over the needle beams, (NOT over the queen
posts), then up thru the floor. Repeat lacing back and forth for each
additional truss rod. Since both ends of the filament are still free, it is
easy to uniformly adjust the truss rods to eliminate any slack, but still
not lifted onto the queen posts. Weave the two ends of the filament spirally
around each other across the floor, and temporarily lift the truss rods onto
the queen posts to check for the desired final tension, release back down to
the needle beam position. Tie off each end with an overhand knot at the
outboard edges. Secure with ACC or Goo. Clip off the excess lengths.



Very Important: For Box, Reefer and Gondola Cars proceed next to install the
Sides and Ends before lifting the truss rods onto the queen posts to prevent
humping up the car floor. Since Flat Cars have no Sides to stiffen the
floor, be very careful with the amount of final tension of the rods when
lifted onto the Queen Posts to prevent humping up the floor.



Joe Bower

.



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

I used Tichy phosphor bronze wire for the first truss rod car I built, and I
came to regret it. We experience temperature extremes in Iowa that caused
enough expansion and contraction to bow the wires between glue points at the
floor and on the queen posts. Once the wires are distorted, they really
can't be fixed short of completely replacing them. Never again.



Monofilament has its own problems, and I find that the monofilament line in
kits is so large in diameter that it's impossible to get a sharp bend at the
queen posts - I get a curve instead of a bend. I use finer line to minimize
that problem.



Nelson Moyer

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
al_brown03
Sent: Wednesday, May 02, 2012 9:21 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Modeling truss rods





Mm ... truss rods are under tension. Therefore, they're taut. I have trouble
getting monofilament to stay taut; this may be my fault, but therefore I
prefer wire. Since one wants stiffness, I prefer phosphor bronze wire to
brass for use in truss rods.

YMMV --

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "Joe Bower"
<jnbower1@...> wrote:

Group: Guess what! I just found this message in my "never sent Drafts
folder". I recall the subject was pretty thoroughly covered, but
nevertheless, for what it may be worth, here are my thoughts on the
subject.
Joe Bower



Group: I have built many H.O. Scale wood, resin, and scratch-built styrene
old time freight cars using mono-filament, and basically as described by
O.Fenton Wells method #2 (1-29-'11 email). I prefer mono-filament since it
won't be bent out of shape as frequently occurs with wire truss rods.



I mask the turnbuckles so the unpainted mono-filament appears to be open
in
the center of the turnbuckle. I use one length of mono-filament, lacing it
down thru the first outboard hole in the floor, sliding on a turn buckle,
temporarily passing the filament over the needle beams, (NOT over the
queen
posts), then up thru the floor. Repeat lacing back and forth for each
additional truss rod. Since both ends of the filament are still free, it
is
easy to uniformly adjust the truss rods to eliminate any slack, but still
not lifted onto the queen posts. Weave the two ends of the filament
spirally
around each other across the floor, and temporarily lift the truss rods
onto
the queen posts to check for the desired final tension, release back down
to
the needle beam position. Tie off each end with an overhand knot at the
outboard edges. Secure with ACC or Goo. Clip off the excess lengths.



Very Important: For Box, Reefer and Gondola Cars proceed next to install
the
Sides and Ends before lifting the truss rods onto the queen posts to
prevent
humping up the car floor. Since Flat Cars have no Sides to stiffen the
floor, be very careful with the amount of final tension of the rods when
lifted onto the Queen Posts to prevent humping up the floor.



Joe Bower

.





al_brown03
 

Interesting. Not disputing Mr Moyer's experience in the least, I suspect the key phrase may be "[w]e experience temperature extremes in Iowa" ... down here we don't, so I can get away with using phosphor-bronze wire (though I see where "temperature extremes" might render it unsuitable). How do y'all get monofilament to stay taut? As I said, I've never had any luck with that.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@..., "Nelson Moyer" <ku0a@...> wrote:

I used Tichy phosphor bronze wire for the first truss rod car I built, and I
came to regret it. We experience temperature extremes in Iowa that caused
enough expansion and contraction to bow the wires between glue points at the
floor and on the queen posts. Once the wires are distorted, they really
can't be fixed short of completely replacing them. Never again.



Monofilament has its own problems, and I find that the monofilament line in
kits is so large in diameter that it's impossible to get a sharp bend at the
queen posts - I get a curve instead of a bend. I use finer line to minimize
that problem.



Nelson Moyer



-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
al_brown03
Sent: Wednesday, May 02, 2012 9:21 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Modeling truss rods





Mm ... truss rods are under tension. Therefore, they're taut. I have trouble
getting monofilament to stay taut; this may be my fault, but therefore I
prefer wire. Since one wants stiffness, I prefer phosphor bronze wire to
brass for use in truss rods.

YMMV --

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "Joe Bower"
<jnbower1@> wrote:

Group: Guess what! I just found this message in my "never sent Drafts
folder". I recall the subject was pretty thoroughly covered, but
nevertheless, for what it may be worth, here are my thoughts on the
subject.
Joe Bower



Group: I have built many H.O. Scale wood, resin, and scratch-built styrene
old time freight cars using mono-filament, and basically as described by
O.Fenton Wells method #2 (1-29-'11 email). I prefer mono-filament since it
won't be bent out of shape as frequently occurs with wire truss rods.



I mask the turnbuckles so the unpainted mono-filament appears to be open
in
the center of the turnbuckle. I use one length of mono-filament, lacing it
down thru the first outboard hole in the floor, sliding on a turn buckle,
temporarily passing the filament over the needle beams, (NOT over the
queen
posts), then up thru the floor. Repeat lacing back and forth for each
additional truss rod. Since both ends of the filament are still free, it
is
easy to uniformly adjust the truss rods to eliminate any slack, but still
not lifted onto the queen posts. Weave the two ends of the filament
spirally
around each other across the floor, and temporarily lift the truss rods
onto
the queen posts to check for the desired final tension, release back down
to
the needle beam position. Tie off each end with an overhand knot at the
outboard edges. Secure with ACC or Goo. Clip off the excess lengths.



Very Important: For Box, Reefer and Gondola Cars proceed next to install
the
Sides and Ends before lifting the truss rods onto the queen posts to
prevent
humping up the car floor. Since Flat Cars have no Sides to stiffen the
floor, be very careful with the amount of final tension of the rods when
lifted onto the Queen Posts to prevent humping up the floor.



Joe Bower

.



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Armand Premo
 

Really never had a problem with it.Guess it all depends on how it is attached. I generally use a continuous application with as few knots as possible,although I have experimented from time- to -time.Monofilament is available in very small sizes,The major problem that I have is running it through the turnbuckle.(Eyes you know).Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: al_brown03
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, May 03, 2012 1:06 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Modeling truss rods



Interesting. Not disputing Mr Moyer's experience in the least, I suspect the key phrase may be "[w]e experience temperature extremes in Iowa" ... down here we don't, so I can get away with using phosphor-bronze wire (though I see where "temperature extremes" might render it unsuitable). How do y'all get monofilament to stay taut? As I said, I've never had any luck with that.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@..., "Nelson Moyer" <ku0a@...> wrote:
>
> I used Tichy phosphor bronze wire for the first truss rod car I built, and I
> came to regret it. We experience temperature extremes in Iowa that caused
> enough expansion and contraction to bow the wires between glue points at the
> floor and on the queen posts. Once the wires are distorted, they really
> can't be fixed short of completely replacing them. Never again.
>
>
>
> Monofilament has its own problems, and I find that the monofilament line in
> kits is so large in diameter that it's impossible to get a sharp bend at the
> queen posts - I get a curve instead of a bend. I use finer line to minimize
> that problem.
>
>
>
> Nelson Moyer
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
> al_brown03
> Sent: Wednesday, May 02, 2012 9:21 PM
> To: STMFC@...
> Subject: [STMFC] Re: Modeling truss rods
>
>
>
>
>
> Mm ... truss rods are under tension. Therefore, they're taut. I have trouble
> getting monofilament to stay taut; this may be my fault, but therefore I
> prefer wire. Since one wants stiffness, I prefer phosphor bronze wire to
> brass for use in truss rods.
>
> YMMV --
>
> Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.
>
> --- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "Joe Bower"
> <jnbower1@> wrote:
> >
> > Group: Guess what! I just found this message in my "never sent Drafts
> > folder". I recall the subject was pretty thoroughly covered, but
> > nevertheless, for what it may be worth, here are my thoughts on the
> subject.
> > Joe Bower
> >
> >
> >
> > Group: I have built many H.O. Scale wood, resin, and scratch-built styrene
> > old time freight cars using mono-filament, and basically as described by
> > O.Fenton Wells method #2 (1-29-'11 email). I prefer mono-filament since it
> > won't be bent out of shape as frequently occurs with wire truss rods.
> >
> >
> >
> > I mask the turnbuckles so the unpainted mono-filament appears to be open
> in
> > the center of the turnbuckle. I use one length of mono-filament, lacing it
> > down thru the first outboard hole in the floor, sliding on a turn buckle,
> > temporarily passing the filament over the needle beams, (NOT over the
> queen
> > posts), then up thru the floor. Repeat lacing back and forth for each
> > additional truss rod. Since both ends of the filament are still free, it
> is
> > easy to uniformly adjust the truss rods to eliminate any slack, but still
> > not lifted onto the queen posts. Weave the two ends of the filament
> spirally
> > around each other across the floor, and temporarily lift the truss rods
> onto
> > the queen posts to check for the desired final tension, release back down
> to
> > the needle beam position. Tie off each end with an overhand knot at the
> > outboard edges. Secure with ACC or Goo. Clip off the excess lengths.
> >
> >
> >
> > Very Important: For Box, Reefer and Gondola Cars proceed next to install
> the
> > Sides and Ends before lifting the truss rods onto the queen posts to
> prevent
> > humping up the car floor. Since Flat Cars have no Sides to stiffen the
> > floor, be very careful with the amount of final tension of the rods when
> > lifted onto the Queen Posts to prevent humping up the floor.
> >
> >
> >
> > Joe Bower
> >
> > .
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
>
>
>
>
>
>


Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

Al wrote:
<How do y'all get monofilament to stay taut? As I said, I've never had
<any luck with that.

Rather than use a continuous piece of monofilament for all of the truss
rods, I use one piece of monofilament per rod. I first drill holes through
the floor above each bolster just slightly larger than the monofilament. I
also cut several pieces of .100"x.100" styrene about 3/16" long, one for
each truss rod. A hole is drilled through each of these pieces of styrene
too.

I then cut a length of filament maybe 2" (actual) inches longer than needed
and tie an overhand knot in one end. I feed the tag end (the end without the
knot) through the floor from the inside, through the turnbuckle, and then
through the hole in the other end of the car from the outside. I then feed
the monofilament through one of the pieces of styrene and tie an overhand
knot in the tag end and cut off the excess monofilament. When the truss rod
in on the queenposts, the styrene strip should be around an 1/8" (actual,
not critical) from where the monofilament comes through the floor.

It is then easy to put the monofilament up on the queenposts and tighten it
by sliding the styrene strip away from the hole in the floor. When you are
satisfied with the tension, glue the piece of styrene to the floor.

If you want open turnbuckles, heat the ends of two pieces of monofilament
with a match to create small bulbs and then feed them into the turnbuckle
from the inside. The "bulbs" will keep the monofilament from sliding out of
the turnbuckles. Use the same styrene strip idea as above to create the
necessary tension but use a piece of styrene on each end of the
monofilament. That will let you also center the turnbuckles between the
queenposts.

Jack Burgess
Newark, CA


O Fenton Wells
 

Jack, I believe I first saw the method I use in the F&C Southern SU boxcar
kit instructions in the late 1980's. Just pull the line as taught as you
can (within reason) without putting it on the queen posts. Then when you
get the car floor all together (actually I complete most of the car prior
to painting) take a pick and pull it up onto the queen posts. Some of my
SU's are 10 years old and teh truss rods are still taught. I tried to do
it with the individual trussrods out of mono filament line and, although it
worked... finally I just don't have that much patience and the end result
didn't justify the method in my case. You are probably several notches
above my ability judging from the photos I've seen of your layout in the
model press. So your methods may be better for you and your ability.
Fenton
On Thu, May 3, 2012 at 10:45 AM, Jack Burgess <jack@...>wrote:

**


Al wrote:
<How do y'all get monofilament to stay taut? As I said, I've never had
<any luck with that.

Rather than use a continuous piece of monofilament for all of the truss
rods, I use one piece of monofilament per rod. I first drill holes through
the floor above each bolster just slightly larger than the monofilament. I
also cut several pieces of .100"x.100" styrene about 3/16" long, one for
each truss rod. A hole is drilled through each of these pieces of styrene
too.

I then cut a length of filament maybe 2" (actual) inches longer than needed
and tie an overhand knot in one end. I feed the tag end (the end without
the
knot) through the floor from the inside, through the turnbuckle, and then
through the hole in the other end of the car from the outside. I then feed
the monofilament through one of the pieces of styrene and tie an overhand
knot in the tag end and cut off the excess monofilament. When the truss rod
in on the queenposts, the styrene strip should be around an 1/8" (actual,
not critical) from where the monofilament comes through the floor.

It is then easy to put the monofilament up on the queenposts and tighten it
by sliding the styrene strip away from the hole in the floor. When you are
satisfied with the tension, glue the piece of styrene to the floor.

If you want open turnbuckles, heat the ends of two pieces of monofilament
with a match to create small bulbs and then feed them into the turnbuckle
from the inside. The "bulbs" will keep the monofilament from sliding out of
the turnbuckles. Use the same styrene strip idea as above to create the
necessary tension but use a piece of styrene on each end of the
monofilament. That will let you also center the turnbuckles between the
queenposts.

Jack Burgess
Newark, CA





--
Fenton Wells
3047 Creek Run
Sanford NC 27332
919-499-5545
srrfan1401@...


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


robertm <robertmoeller47@...>
 

Having just done a Central Vermont truss rod coach I'll add that I tried monofilament, something called "jelly thread", and "music wire.
This was my first truss rod car so I'm a rookie. Its easy to install monofilament. My concern is that it is flexible, good for installation but I wonder how it will deal with the accidental bump. I was also concerned about paint sticking. I tried white and tried to find black monofilament. Finally I though the monofilament I found was too small.

The jelly thread was the right size but needed to be pulled taught. I thought this put too much tension on the queen posts. It also was the right color - black.

In the end I used music wire. I made a truss rod by bending the music wire to get a rod that I felt was right. I used this sample rod to make a wire bending jig and made the four truss rods I needed. This wire is stiffer than brass wire, its steel, and holds its shape really well.The good thing about the jigs is that it makes all the rods the same. One problem with these stiff rods is installation. They need to be inserted through the cross bears and queen posts. On my next car I would install the wires before gluing the cross bears and queen posts, then glue the truss rods, finally adding the turnbuckles. On my model I had to shorten the truss rods to make sure the trucks would turn. The two inner truss rods ended at the cross bears for this same reason.

Bob Moeller

--- In STMFC@..., "Armand Premo" <armprem2@...> wrote:

Really never had a problem with it.Guess it all depends on how it is attached. I generally use a continuous application with as few knots as possible,although I have experimented from time- to -time.Monofilament is available in very small sizes,The major problem that I have is running it through the turnbuckle.(Eyes you know).Armand Premo


mwbpequod
 

Except in select cases I discontinued using either brass or phosphorbronze wire for truss rods and replaced all at with a single length of #0 black braide surgical silk. I anchor the one end with the terminal nbw, thread through the entire car w/o putting it up on the queenposts all under as much tension as I can muster, anchoring it at each pass through with another nbw, and then when at the end of the process, lift the silk up onto the queenposts. There's enough tension there to play a tune.... Just trim off the excess about the nbw's with a #10 scalpel blade.

Just don't forget to put the turnbuckles on the thread as you go!

Martin

--- In STMFC@..., "robertm" <robertmoeller47@...> wrote:

Having just done a Central Vermont truss rod coach I'll add that I tried monofilament, something called "jelly thread", and "music wire.
This was my first truss rod car so I'm a rookie. Its easy to install monofilament. My concern is that it is flexible, good for installation but I wonder how it will deal with the accidental bump. I was also concerned about paint sticking. I tried white and tried to find black monofilament. Finally I though the monofilament I found was too small.

The jelly thread was the right size but needed to be pulled taught. I thought this put too much tension on the queen posts. It also was the right color - black.

In the end I used music wire. I made a truss rod by bending the music wire to get a rod that I felt was right. I used this sample rod to make a wire bending jig and made the four truss rods I needed. This wire is stiffer than brass wire, its steel, and holds its shape really well.The good thing about the jigs is that it makes all the rods the same. One problem with these stiff rods is installation. They need to be inserted through the cross bears and queen posts. On my next car I would install the wires before gluing the cross bears and queen posts, then glue the truss rods, finally adding the turnbuckles. On my model I had to shorten the truss rods to make sure the trucks would turn. The two inner truss rods ended at the cross bears for this same reason.

Bob Moeller

--- In STMFC@..., "Armand Premo" <armprem2@> wrote:

Really never had a problem with it.Guess it all depends on how it is attached. I generally use a continuous application with as few knots as possible,although I have experimented from time- to -time.Monofilament is available in very small sizes,The major problem that I have is running it through the turnbuckle.(Eyes you know).Armand Premo


ed_mines
 

--- In STMFC@..., "robertm" <robertmoeller47@...> wrote:
In the end I used music wire.
What diameter did you use and where did you get it?

Ed Mines


robertm <robertmoeller47@...>
 

At the recommendation of a modeler better than me I used

.025" music wire from K&S Engineering. You can find it at Walthers.

The good thing about this is its steel just like the prototype.

Bob Moeller

--- In STMFC@..., "EdwardM" <ed_mines@...> wrote:



--- In STMFC@..., "robertm" <robertmoeller47@> wrote:
In the end I used music wire.
What diameter did you use and where did you get it?

Ed Mines


Tim O'Connor
 

That sounds too large to me. How large is the prototype truss rod (diameter)?

Tim O'Connor

----- Original Message -----
From: "robertm" <robertmoeller47@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, May 9, 2012 7:47:06 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Modeling truss rods

At the recommendation of a modeler better than me I used

.025" music wire from K&S Engineering. You can find it at Walthers.

The good thing about this is its steel just like the prototype.

Bob Moeller


Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

Let's see now, 0.025 in. wire is equivalent to 2.25 in. in HO scale. Those
are some bodacious truss rods!



Nelson

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
robertm
Sent: Wednesday, May 09, 2012 6:47 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Modeling truss rods





At the recommendation of a modeler better than me I used

.025" music wire from K&S Engineering. You can find it at Walthers.

The good thing about this is its steel just like the prototype.

Bob Moeller

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "EdwardM"
<ed_mines@...> wrote:



--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "robertm"
<robertmoeller47@> wrote:
In the end I used music wire.
What diameter did you use and where did you get it?

Ed Mines


Steve SANDIFER
 

Details west makes stainless wire as small as .010 which I use for all sorts
of piping. It will not bend as easily as brass.



______________________________________________

J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer

mailto:steve.sandifer@...

Home: 12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918

Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX
77025, 713-667-9417



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Nelson Moyer
Sent: Wednesday, May 09, 2012 10:58 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Modeling truss rods





Let's see now, 0.025 in. wire is equivalent to 2.25 in. in HO scale. Those
are some bodacious truss rods!

Nelson

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf
Of
robertm
Sent: Wednesday, May 09, 2012 6:47 AM
To: STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Modeling truss rods

At the recommendation of a modeler better than me I used

.025" music wire from K&S Engineering. You can find it at Walthers.

The good thing about this is its steel just like the prototype.

Bob Moeller

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "EdwardM"
<ed_mines@...> wrote:



--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "robertm"
<robertmoeller47@> wrote:
In the end I used music wire.
What diameter did you use and where did you get it?

Ed Mines


Richard B <brennan8@...>
 

It depends on what size bridge you are modeling...


Richard

(STMFC: ... that the the freight cars traveled over!)

--- In STMFC@..., "Nelson Moyer" <ku0a@...> wrote:
Let's see now, 0.025 in. wire is equivalent to 2.25 in. in HO scale.
Those are some bodacious truss rods!


Andy Harman
 

At 11:47 AM 5/9/2012 +0000, you wrote:

.025" music wire from K&S Engineering. You can find it at Walthers.
The good thing about this is its steel just like the prototype.
And if properly adjusted you can play Foggy Mountain Breakdown on your truss rods :-)

Andy


albyrno
 

The advantage to THICK .025 wire is it won't bend easily,I've had craftsmen kits with .008 brass wire for truss rods.I use .011 because thats the size of the first string on my guitar,its spring steel/music wire and is free,go to a music store and ask for an old acoustic guitar string the diameter you desire or from musician friend or buy a steel string for guitar.
 Alan


________________________________
From: Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, May 9, 2012 8:57 AM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Modeling truss rods


 

Let's see now, 0.025 in. wire is equivalent to 2.25 in. in HO scale. Those
are some bodacious truss rods!

Nelson

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
robertm
Sent: Wednesday, May 09, 2012 6:47 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Modeling truss rods

At the recommendation of a modeler better than me I used

.025" music wire from K&S Engineering. You can find it at Walthers.

The good thing about this is its steel just like the prototype.

Bob Moeller

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "EdwardM"
<ed_mines@...> wrote:



--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "robertm"
<robertmoeller47@> wrote:
In the end I used music wire.
What diameter did you use and where did you get it?

Ed Mines


robertm <robertmoeller47@...>
 

Have no idea, I do have photos of the car, and the truss rods on the model look very good to me. My modeler friend got this recommendation from someone who models a lot of truss rod cars. My truss rods are on a passenger car not freight. The car is a Central Vermont 300 series truss rod coach built in 1912, later steel sheathed.

Bob Moeller

--- In STMFC@..., timboconnor@... wrote:


That sounds too large to me. How large is the prototype truss rod (diameter)?

Tim O'Connor

----- Original Message -----
From: "robertm" <robertmoeller47@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, May 9, 2012 7:47:06 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Modeling truss rods

At the recommendation of a modeler better than me I used

.025" music wire from K&S Engineering. You can find it at Walthers.

The good thing about this is its steel just like the prototype.

Bob Moeller



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

I visited the Colorado Railroad Museum last fall, and while I didn't measure
the diameter of truss rods on the cars out there, I would estimate that they
were between 5/8 in. and 7/8 in. in diameter. Considering the absence of an
authoritative response to this thread, I'll actually measure the next car I
see. To do prototype modeling of 7/8 in. truss rods, you would use 0.010 in.
wire, monofilament, or surgical nylon.



Nelson

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
robertm
Sent: Thursday, May 10, 2012 5:33 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Modeling truss rods





Have no idea, I do have photos of the car, and the truss rods on the model
look very good to me. My modeler friend got this recommendation from someone
who models a lot of truss rod cars. My truss rods are on a passenger car not
freight. The car is a Central Vermont 300 series truss rod coach built in
1912, later steel sheathed.

Bob Moeller

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> ,
timboconnor@... wrote:


That sounds too large to me. How large is the prototype truss rod
(diameter)?

Tim O'Connor

----- Original Message -----
From: "robertm" <robertmoeller47@...>
To: STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, May 9, 2012 7:47:06 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Modeling truss rods

At the recommendation of a modeler better than me I used

.025" music wire from K&S Engineering. You can find it at Walthers.

The good thing about this is its steel just like the prototype.

Bob Moeller





Gene <bierglaeser@...>
 

The Railroad Car Journal, January 1893, page 65, Live
Poultry Transportation Co. poultry car: Four 1 in. longitudinal truss rods, enlarged to 1 1/4 in. at the threads.

The Railroad Car Journal, April 1893, page 163, Wabash coal car: 1 1/8" rod with 1 1/4" ends.

The Railroad Car Journal, May 1893, page 175, NYC&HRR box car: Four 1 1/8 in. rods with the ends upset to receive 1 1/4 nuts.

Railroad Car Journal, January 1897, page 12, Illinois Central furniture car: Six 1 1/8 inch truss rods.

Locomotive Engineering, February 1897, page 158, Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburg Ry. coal car: Four rods with bodies 1 1/4 inches in diameter, and ends upset to 1 1/2 inches for nuts and turnbuckle.

Railway Master Mechanic, January 1902, page 9, CB&Q box car: 1 1/4" truss rods.

Railway Master Mechanic, February 1902, page 42, Delaware, Lackawanna & Western box car: Four 1 1/8" truss rods.

Railway Master Mechanic, April 1902, page 117, AT&SF box & stock cars: Four 1 1/4" truss rods with ends upset to 1 1/2 inch.

The Railroad Gazette, November 3, 1905, page 421, Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific combination stock and drop bottom car: Truss rods 1 1/2 " diameter.

Railway Master Mechanic, January 1907, page 24, Boston & Maine box cars: Four 1 1/8" truss rods with enlarged ends.

Gene Green