Airbrush question


Mark Stamm
 

Good Morning,



I'm going to breakdown and buy and airbrush even though I just want to keep
sending Sunshine checks I need to be able to paint without visiting friends.
I have used brushes from several different manufacturers as well as single
and double action styles; that is not in question. My question is what do
experienced people prefer an attached gravity-fed cup or a siphon-fed
under-mount bottle? TIA for your opinions.



Regards



Mark Stamm

<mailto:mark@euphoriatt.com> mark@euphoriatt.com

Modeling the Mighty Pennsy in 1949


Andy Sperandeo
 

Hi Mark,

I prefer the siphon bottle by a large margin. I may be just too clumsy to use the gravity cup without spilling, but I also like being able to screw a siphon cap onto the same bottle in which I store the paint mixture. I also use in-bottle screen filters.

Good luck with your new airbrush,

Andy


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Mark Stamm wrote:
I'm going to breakdown and buy and airbrush even though I just want to keep sending Sunshine checks I need to be able to paint without visiting friends. I have used brushes from several different manufacturers as well as single and double action styles; that is not in question. My question is what do experienced people prefer an attached gravity-fed cup or a siphon-fed under-mount bottle? TIA for your opinions.
Mark, I mostly use my airbrush for painting entire objects (cars, structures, sprues of details) and for that I use the bottle siphon. The advantage of the cup is making a small amount of a color for some specific use, so I use it less often. Even for weathering, when I use my double-action brush, I usually use the bottle siphon. But I have known skilled airbrush users who swear by the cup, so I think you may get opinions from that side too.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

I use either a Paasche single action or an Iwata double action airbrush,
depending upon whether I'm using enamel, lacquer, or acrylic paints. I use
both cup and bottles with the Paasche H Series, depending upon what I'm
painting or weathering. If the job is small, the cup is convenient and easy
to clean, but do filter the paint mix before loading the cup. For larger
surface areas, 1 oz. bottles are my choice, and for track or really large
applications, I use a 3 oz. bottle. I have H-1, H-3, and H-5 tips
for the Paasche but for most painting, I use the H-3. For track or large
structures, I use the H-5 tip. The H-1 is for weathering mixes with lots of
thinner. The Iwata has a top feed cup built into the handle, and I use it
for weathering and small painting jobs when I'm using acrylic paints. The
Iwata cup has a pressure fitting lid with a hole in the middle to prevent
spilling, but I never felt the need to use it.



I try to mix the amount of paint I plan to use within a few days, so I don't
have to store the spray mix very long. Acrylics are notorious for
polymerization following air exposure, so filtering is a must. Enamel and
lacquer paints are much more forgiving in that regard, and a few drops of
thinner will bring them back to proper consistency. Mixing bottles from
Paasche don't seal tightly, even with the gasket in place, so I cut 2 in.
sq. pieces of wax paper to put over the top of the paint bottles before
screwing on the lid to improve seal and protect the bottle threads from
dried paint.



Nelson Moyer

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mark
at Euphoriatt
Sent: Saturday, July 28, 2012 11:16 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Airbrush question





Good Morning,

I'm going to breakdown and buy and airbrush even though I just want to keep
sending Sunshine checks I need to be able to paint without visiting friends.
I have used brushes from several different manufacturers as well as single
and double action styles; that is not in question. My question is what do
experienced people prefer an attached gravity-fed cup or a siphon-fed
under-mount bottle? TIA for your opinions.

Regards

Mark Stamm

<mailto:mark@euphoriatt.com <mailto:mark%40euphoriatt.com> >
mark@euphoriatt.com <mailto:mark%40euphoriatt.com>

Modeling the Mighty Pennsy in 1949


Jared Harper
 

I agree with Nelson although I would choose the Iwata double action. I have a new Paasche single action set in the box I will sell.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Nelson Moyer" <ku0a@...> wrote:

I use either a Paasche single action or an Iwata double action airbrush,
depending upon whether I'm using enamel, lacquer, or acrylic paints. I use
both cup and bottles with the Paasche H Series, depending upon what I'm
painting or weathering. If the job is small, the cup is convenient and easy
to clean, but do filter the paint mix before loading the cup. For larger
surface areas, 1 oz. bottles are my choice, and for track or really large
applications, I use a 3 oz. bottle. I have H-1, H-3, and H-5 tips
for the Paasche but for most painting, I use the H-3. For track or large
structures, I use the H-5 tip. The H-1 is for weathering mixes with lots of
thinner. The Iwata has a top feed cup built into the handle, and I use it
for weathering and small painting jobs when I'm using acrylic paints. The
Iwata cup has a pressure fitting lid with a hole in the middle to prevent
spilling, but I never felt the need to use it.



I try to mix the amount of paint I plan to use within a few days, so I don't
have to store the spray mix very long. Acrylics are notorious for
polymerization following air exposure, so filtering is a must. Enamel and
lacquer paints are much more forgiving in that regard, and a few drops of
thinner will bring them back to proper consistency. Mixing bottles from
Paasche don't seal tightly, even with the gasket in place, so I cut 2 in.
sq. pieces of wax paper to put over the top of the paint bottles before
screwing on the lid to improve seal and protect the bottle threads from
dried paint.



Nelson Moyer



-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mark
at Euphoriatt
Sent: Saturday, July 28, 2012 11:16 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Airbrush question





Good Morning,

I'm going to breakdown and buy and airbrush even though I just want to keep
sending Sunshine checks I need to be able to paint without visiting friends.
I have used brushes from several different manufacturers as well as single
and double action styles; that is not in question. My question is what do
experienced people prefer an attached gravity-fed cup or a siphon-fed
under-mount bottle? TIA for your opinions.

Regards

Mark Stamm

<mailto:mark@... <mailto:mark%40euphoriatt.com> >
mark@... <mailto:mark%40euphoriatt.com>

Modeling the Mighty Pennsy in 1949









John Hagen <sprinthag@...>
 

I've been using my internal mix double action Paasche since around 1986 or
so with great results. Basic differences in design such as single or double
action and internal of external mix can make fo some rather obvious
differences in performance, most of the high quality brushes of similar
design will perform quite similarly depending on the individual users
personal likes.



John Hagen



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
JaredH
Sent: Saturday, July 28, 2012 5:06 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Airbrush question





I agree with Nelson although I would choose the Iwata double action. I have
a new Paasche single action set in the box I will sell.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA




Reply to
<mailto:harperandbrown@gmail.com?subject=Re%3A%20Airbrush%20question> sender
| Reply to
<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com?subject=Re%3A%20Airbrush%20question> group |
Reply
<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/post;_ylc=X3oDMTJyazAzOTFrBF9TAzk3MzU5N
zE0BGdycElkAzI1NTQ3NTMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MTY5NzI1BG1zZ0lkAzExMDM2MQRzZWMDZnRyB
HNsawNycGx5BHN0aW1lAzEzNDM1MTMxNzk-?act=reply&messageNum=110361> via web
post |
<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/post;_ylc=X3oDMTJlaXVtanVuBF9TAzk3MzU5N
zE0BGdycElkAzI1NTQ3NTMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MTY5NzI1BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA250cGMEc3Rpb
WUDMTM0MzUxMzE3OQ--> Start a New Topic

Messages in this topic
<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/message/110355;_ylc=X3oDMTM4MmRmbXNhBF9
TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzI1NTQ3NTMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MTY5NzI1BG1zZ0lkAzExMDM2MQR
zZWMDZnRyBHNsawN2dHBjBHN0aW1lAzEzNDM1MTMxNzkEdHBjSWQDMTEwMzU1> (5)

Recent Activity:

.
<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/members;_ylc=X3oDMTJmYms2dGQyBF9TAzk3Mz
U5NzE0BGdycElkAzI1NTQ3NTMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MTY5NzI1BHNlYwN2dGwEc2xrA3ZtYnJzBH
N0aW1lAzEzNDM1MTMxNzk-?o=6> New Members 2


<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC;_ylc=X3oDMTJlaWI0anBkBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BG
dycElkAzI1NTQ3NTMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MTY5NzI1BHNlYwN2dGwEc2xrA3ZnaHAEc3RpbWUDMT
M0MzUxMzE3OQ--> Visit Your Group


<http://groups.yahoo.com/;_ylc=X3oDMTJkamlpMjVjBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzI1N
TQ3NTMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MTY5NzI1BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA2dmcARzdGltZQMxMzQzNTEzMTc5>
Yahoo! Groups

Switch to:
<mailto:STMFC-traditional@yahoogroups.com?subject=Change%20Delivery%20Format
:%20Traditional> Text-Only,
<mailto:STMFC-digest@yahoogroups.com?subject=Email%20Delivery:%20Digest>
Daily Digest .
<mailto:STMFC-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe> Unsubscribe .
<http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/> Terms of Use

.


<http://geo.yahoo.com/serv?s=97359714/grpId=2554753/grpspId=1705169725/msgId
=110361/stime=1343513179/nc1=4025338/nc2=3848627/nc3=4767086>


Jack Burgess
 

Mark...

I'm on the road and can't give you a lot of details but after 30+ years of using Badger double-action air brushes, I bought an Iwata gravity-feed brush a couple of years ago. I use only Floquil enamels and one of the advantages is that you don't need to dilute Floquil with this brush. Not to dump on Andy, but I have not had issues with the gravity feed. Send me any e-mail and I can give you a model number but it is great for an overall first coat of a freight car as well as weathering.

Jack Burgess

On Jul 28, 2012, at 9:15 AM, "Mark at Euphoriatt" <mark@euphoriatt.com> wrote:

Good Morning,



I'm going to breakdown and buy and airbrush even though I just want to keep
sending Sunshine checks I need to be able to paint without visiting friends.
I have used brushes from several different manufacturers as well as single
and double action styles; that is not in question. My question is what do
experienced people prefer an attached gravity-fed cup or a siphon-fed
under-mount bottle? TIA for your opinions.



Regards



Mark Stamm

<mailto:mark@euphoriatt.com> mark@euphoriatt.com

Modeling the Mighty Pennsy in 1949





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Steve SANDIFER
 

For most car painting I use the cup. The only time I use the bottle is if I have a large amount to paint of the same color, a large amount. Nearly everything I do is custom mixed, using eyedroppers for mixtures.
______________
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@sbcglobal.net
Home: 12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX 77025, 713-667-9417

----- Original Message -----
From: Mark at Euphoriatt
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, July 28, 2012 11:15 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Airbrush question



Good Morning,

I'm going to breakdown and buy and airbrush even though I just want to keep
sending Sunshine checks I need to be able to paint without visiting friends.
I have used brushes from several different manufacturers as well as single
and double action styles; that is not in question. My question is what do
experienced people prefer an attached gravity-fed cup or a siphon-fed
under-mount bottle? TIA for your opinions.

Regards

Mark Stamm

<mailto:mark@euphoriatt.com> mark@euphoriatt.com

Modeling the Mighty Pennsy in 1949


atsfnut <michaelEGross@...>
 

Hello, Friends!
My two cents: I've used the Paasche Model H single action, external mix
brush since 1976, with excellent results. That being said, I recently
acquired a Badger single-action internal mix brush (Model 200NH) and did
some fine painting with Modelflex. Rarely do I keep large amounts of
paint in bottles, as I like to vary "freight car reds" and Santa Fe
Mineral Browns to avoid that "cookie cutter look."
Many fine scale modelers swear by the gravity feed brushes, as it allows
one to paint at lower pressures, which is particularly when it comes to
fine weathering. I've not found a gravity feed necessary, but they have
their place. Whatever brush you choose, get to know it. "Play" with it
on an inexpensive swap meet model before painting your Sunshine kit.
And do filter that paint, particularly if it is acrylic.
Cheers!
Michael GrossLa Ca├▒ada, CA


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Sandifer" <steve.sandifer@...>
wrote:

For most car painting I use the cup. The only time I use the bottle is
if I have a large amount to paint of the same color, a large amount.
Nearly everything I do is custom mixed, using eyedroppers for mixtures.
______________
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@...
Home: 12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston,
TX 77025, 713-667-9417

----- Original Message -----
From: Mark at Euphoriatt
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, July 28, 2012 11:15 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Airbrush question



Good Morning,

I'm going to breakdown and buy and airbrush even though I just want
to keep
sending Sunshine checks I need to be able to paint without visiting
friends.
I have used brushes from several different manufacturers as well as
single
and double action styles; that is not in question. My question is
what do
experienced people prefer an attached gravity-fed cup or a
siphon-fed
under-mount bottle? TIA for your opinions.

Regards

Mark Stamm

<mailto:mark@... mark@...

Modeling the Mighty Pennsy in 1949

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


ronald parisi
 

Group:
I use a double action gravity feed brush. I have a few different size cups
and find mixing small amounts of color especially for weathering
a definite plus. My brushes are all Thayer & Chandler. I just had them all
professionally refurbished. The only one they could not do because of lack
of parts was a 1946 T&C model that I inherited in 1967 and had to stop
using two years ago. Keep em clean, and any of them will give you years of
service. And learn how to use it.

Ron Parisi

On Sun, Jul 29, 2012 at 4:19 PM, atsfnut <michaelEGross@aol.com> wrote:

**


Hello, Friends!
My two cents: I've used the Paasche Model H single action, external mix
brush since 1976, with excellent results. That being said, I recently
acquired a Badger single-action internal mix brush (Model 200NH) and did
some fine painting with Modelflex. Rarely do I keep large amounts of
paint in bottles, as I like to vary "freight car reds" and Santa Fe
Mineral Browns to avoid that "cookie cutter look."
Many fine scale modelers swear by the gravity feed brushes, as it allows
one to paint at lower pressures, which is particularly when it comes to
fine weathering. I've not found a gravity feed necessary, but they have
their place. Whatever brush you choose, get to know it. "Play" with it
on an inexpensive swap meet model before painting your Sunshine kit.
And do filter that paint, particularly if it is acrylic.
Cheers!
Michael GrossLa Ca˝ada, CA

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Sandifer" <steve.sandifer@...>
wrote:


For most car painting I use the cup. The only time I use the bottle is
if I have a large amount to paint of the same color, a large amount.
Nearly everything I do is custom mixed, using eyedroppers for mixtures.
______________
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@...
Home: 12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston,
TX 77025, 713-667-9417

----- Original Message -----
From: Mark at Euphoriatt
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, July 28, 2012 11:15 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Airbrush question



Good Morning,

I'm going to breakdown and buy and airbrush even though I just want
to keep
sending Sunshine checks I need to be able to paint without visiting
friends.
I have used brushes from several different manufacturers as well as
single
and double action styles; that is not in question. My question is
what do
experienced people prefer an attached gravity-fed cup or a
siphon-fed
under-mount bottle? TIA for your opinions.

Regards

Mark Stamm

<mailto:mark@... mark@...

Modeling the Mighty Pennsy in 1949

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



Douglas Harding
 

Mark, Badger now makes an airbrush with a gravity cup that will swivel down
for a siphon feed by attaching a bottle. Can't recall, but Iwata may have
one as well. I have Pashaa, Badger & Iwata airbrushes, single and double
action. All are siphon feed, ie from the bottle. As I paint exclusively
acrylics, I use the Iwata Revolution or Badger Antham 155, which have needle
designs for Acrylics.



I have heard folks who prefer the gravity feed vs siphon. Not sure you will
get a clear answer.



Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org