Scratchbuilding a Dreadnaught end door.


Gene Deimling
 

Scott
I just posted an example of an end door made using a vacuum-forming process. I have an extra bare plastic part that you can use to build up your end either for a project car or for casting.
Contact me off the list and we can arrange for the end part.

Keep in mind, you have to build up the frame around the doors and add hinges (Chooch) along with the locking bars (Chooch) to complete the end. The rivets are Tichy. If I were to do another end, I would use Archer decal rivets to save all the drilling.

Gene Deimling
El Dorado Hills, CA

--- In STMFC@..., "Scott" <repairman87@...> wrote:

What methods could be used to shape the corrugations on the end doors? I was thinking cutting out the shape of the ribs and rounding over the edges? Not sure what to do on the bottom of the ribs as they appear to be round.

This would be for O scale.

Thank you,
Scott McDonald


Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Scott" <repairman87@...> wrote:

What methods could be used to shape the corrugations on the end doors? I was thinking cutting out the shape of the ribs and rounding over the edges? Not sure what to do on the bottom of the ribs as they appear to be round.

This would be for O scale.

Thank you,
Scott McDonald
The big problem with the different iterations of the Dreadnaught end is they are more than shapes applied to a flat surface... although some of the models of forty and fifty years ago rendered them as such. Often, they swell above and below the plane that makes the edges; if they are all outward from that plane, the bottom of the pressings is joined by curved surfaces, not flat.

Rob's suggestion to model it as a solid and have it 3-D printed is a good one, I'll add that if the surfaces are well modeled, you might find someone that can cut it in plastic on a hobbyist grade CNC mill. Either way, you need more information to generate the CAD model than is typically available from either plans published in the hobby press, or the general arrangement drawings published in the Car Builder's Cyclopedia. You need a drawing that has several sectional views, both vertical and horizontal, taken at different points to have enough information to accurately model the shape.

Who built the prototype? If Pullman-Standard or one of its predecessor companies, there is a good chance the Pullman Library at the Illinois Railway Museum has the drawings.

Dennis


Scott H. Haycock
 

Scott
What car are you referring to?
Scott Haycock

----- Original Message -----
From: "Scott" <repairman87@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, August 12, 2012 10:29:57 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Scratchbuilding a Dreadnaught end door.






What methods could be used to shape the corrugations on the end doors? I was thinking cutting out the shape of the ribs and rounding over the edges? Not sure what to do on the bottom of the ribs as they appear to be round.

This would be for O scale.

Thank you,
Scott McDonald


Scott H. Haycock
 

Thank you, Rob
Very encouraging! As to small details like hinges I would probably resin cast from a scratchbuilt master anyway. Adding them then to a 3-D printed part and then re-molding would be my approach, I believe, for projects like the one that started this thread. I have built a car end master for the SAL version of the round roof boxcars like the B-7,to retrofit to the bowser cars (PRR prototypes), which produces a close enough model for me. But this is a much simpler end than the door in question. When I have time I'm going to study the photos- I seem to recall a commercial model of an end door car somewhere; MDC? that also might provide a starting point.
Scott Haycock

----- Original Message -----
From: "Rob Kirkham" <rdkirkham@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, August 13, 2012 8:48:05 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Scratchbuilding a Dreadnaught end door.






yes, I was referring to the free version of Sketchup. I understand there
are useful tools in the pay version, but have managed with what I am doing.

Learning curve - well, of course, I'm still on it. For insertion of details
like door hinges into the side of a reefer, I can find Sketchup a real pain.
But for most drawing, I'd say a month of sustained drawing in spare time
will cause you to bump into enough challenges that you'll learn most of it.

Rob

--------------------------------------------------
From: "Scott H. Haycock " < shhaycock@... >
Sent: Sunday, August 12, 2012 11:16 PM
To: < STMFC@... >
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Scratchbuilding a Dreadnaught end door.





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Robert kirkham
 

yes, I was referring to the free version of Sketchup. I understand there are useful tools in the pay version, but have managed with what I am doing.

Learning curve - well, of course, I'm still on it. For insertion of details like door hinges into the side of a reefer, I can find Sketchup a real pain. But for most drawing, I'd say a month of sustained drawing in spare time will cause you to bump into enough challenges that you'll learn most of it.

Rob

--------------------------------------------------
From: "Scott H. Haycock " <shhaycock@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 12, 2012 11:16 PM
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Scratchbuilding a Dreadnaught end door.

Rob, I have Sketchup and a book and have just started learning this program for this very reason (3d printing). Are you referring to the free version? I have learned Cadrail but it took awhile. Cad is a different type of program and not suited to drawing solid objects, but it also has a steep learning curve. Could you give me some idea of how long it took you to get proficient enough to do this?
Thankyou,
Scott Haycock

----- Original Message -----
From: "Rob Kirkham" <rdkirkham@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, August 12, 2012 11:46:51 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Scratchbuilding a Dreadnaught end door.






I suggest that you draw it in Sketchup and have it 3d printed. I haven't
done such a door yet, or I'd offer a copy to you in O. But my efforts with
7/8 Murphy ends and 5/5/5 reverse Murphy ends have worked out fine. Yes
there is a learning curve to drawing a 3d part, but it can be overcome with
practice, the Sketchup for Dummies book and on line resources.

Rob Kirkham










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Scott H. Haycock
 

Rob, I have Sketchup and a book and have just started learning this program for this very reason (3d printing). Are you referring to the free version? I have learned Cadrail but it took awhile. Cad is a different type of program and not suited to drawing solid objects, but it also has a steep learning curve. Could you give me some idea of how long it took you to get proficient enough to do this?
Thankyou,
Scott Haycock

----- Original Message -----
From: "Rob Kirkham" <rdkirkham@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, August 12, 2012 11:46:51 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Scratchbuilding a Dreadnaught end door.






I suggest that you draw it in Sketchup and have it 3d printed. I haven't
done such a door yet, or I'd offer a copy to you in O. But my efforts with
7/8 Murphy ends and 5/5/5 reverse Murphy ends have worked out fine. Yes
there is a learning curve to drawing a 3d part, but it can be overcome with
practice, the Sketchup for Dummies book and on line resources.

Rob Kirkham







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Robert kirkham
 

I suggest that you draw it in Sketchup and have it 3d printed. I haven't done such a door yet, or I'd offer a copy to you in O. But my efforts with 7/8 Murphy ends and 5/5/5 reverse Murphy ends have worked out fine. Yes there is a learning curve to drawing a 3d part, but it can be overcome with practice, the Sketchup for Dummies book and on line resources.

Rob Kirkham

--------------------------------------------------
From: "Scott" <repairman87@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 12, 2012 9:29 PM
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Scratchbuilding a Dreadnaught end door.

What methods could be used to shape the corrugations on the end doors? I was thinking cutting out the shape of the ribs and rounding over the edges? Not sure what to do on the bottom of the ribs as they appear to be round.

This would be for O scale.

Thank you,
Scott McDonald


Scott
 

What methods could be used to shape the corrugations on the end doors? I was thinking cutting out the shape of the ribs and rounding over the edges? Not sure what to do on the bottom of the ribs as they appear to be round.

This would be for O scale.

Thank you,
Scott McDonald