Transporting Hogs On The UP


Bob Chaparro <thecitrusbelt@...>
 

This post from `Mark" popped-up on the Classic UP group. Does anyone have more insight on this? What was the nature of the paper material? Did any other railroads employ these measures?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA
+++++
Hello all,

While digging through some UP documents archived at the Colorado Railway Museum, I came across an interesting 1950s-era memo regarding stock cars. It seems that Swift was noticing that some of their hogs were suffering from / being harmed by severe weather conditions while being transported in stock cars during the coldest winter months. During the winter of 1949/50 they experimented with "papering" (the term used in the memo) stock cars that handled hogs. I would guess that the paper was of "grocery sack" (or greater) thickness, applied to the inside of each car. The memo from January 1951 indicated that Swift and the UP were happy with the experiments and that they would continue to apply the paper, at least during the winter of 1950/51.

Interestingly enough, they applied the paper only to the *north* side of each car, which created some interesting concerns for UP's Operating Dept. personnel. The last line of the memo read:

"There must be no failure to see that these papered cars are used through to destination when bad weather prevails and that the papered side is kept to the northward."

So when "papered cars" were used during cold months, UP was essentially required to reload hogs back into the same cars that they'd arrived in after being unloaded at resting points (at that time, usually Sidney, Cheyenne or Laramie in the case of westbound hogs). That was to be done as opposed to reloading the hogs into different (non-papered) cars such as using CNW cars in / UP cars out, which was often an option. They also had to turn the cars to keep the paper to the north in cases where the paper ended up facing south for any reason (such as during interchange, coming off of a branchline, etc).

Take care,

Mark


Douglas Harding
 

Bob, interesting account, and some interesting questions. It also raises
some questions for me. The message sounds like it is from Mark Amfahr, who
is a UP buff, as well as modeler and dispatcher.



Problems with extreme cold weather and livestock shipments was not unique to
the UP. Apparently the paper was intended to prevent wind from blowing
through the car, and no doubt prevent snow and ice buildup inside the cars.
When you live in blizzard land you learn the north side was because the
prevailing winds for most winter storms is out of the north or northwest.
The south side in turn would take in whatever sunlight, ie solar warming,
would be present. Earth berm homes today are built with the north side
buried in the hill and the south side exposed to the sun for the same
reasons. Further paper on only one side would allow for ventilation to still
occur, something necessary when dealing with livestock.



I have not heard of the papering before. More common was the requirements to
bed hogs with straw in winter months.



An ATSF livestock brochure from the early 40's required "straw in liberal
quantities should be used for bedding cars for hog shipments in cold
weather. This prevents them from piling and smothering trying to keep warm."



AAR Pamphlet No. 19 for Loading & Handling Livestock , revised Jan 1942,
states: "In cold weather, hay or straw must be added and cars for hogs must
have the hay or straw bedding piled about one foot high around the sides and
ends of car to act as a wind breaker. Not less than one and one-half bales
must be used per deck and in extreme weather at least two. Bales to
approximate in weight 200 lbs."



Now for some questions:

1) Was the paper on the inside or outside of the car? I would speculate
the outside, otherwise the hogs would rip it off and harm themselves with
whatever fastener was used to hold the paper in place (staples?).

2) Would the paper have been similar to the paper later used in grain
doors? Or was it felt paper, ie 15lb rolled roofing paper, which was
commonly used to weather proof buildings, esp before siding was installed.

3) Did they use slats or lath to keep the paper in place?

4) I wonder if Jim Dick has found anything in the NP records that shows
a similar problem and solution, as the NP also encountered extreme winter
weather conditions.

5) Why reuse the same cars? If they can paper one car, they can paper
any car.



Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org


asychis@...
 

Not focused on the time frame of this group, but the message about
livestock and cold weather brought back an intense memory of seeing a Union
Pacific sheep extra blasting west through Laramie in the early 1970s during a
blizzard. It was at night, and I was watching trains in the snow on the north
end near the crew change point (almost all trains stopped to change crews
in Laramie until the mid-1970s), trying to get a night shot of a stopped
train in a blizzard. A westbound had pulled up to the office building and
stopped, but didn't get underway after the crew had changed. In a few minutes,
the stock train (about 20 cars if I remember correctly) came through at
full speed with snow-caked cars of woolies. One thing that particularly
grabbed my attention was the rear brakeman on the caboose platform spinning his
lantern really fast in a full circle highball as the caboose passed the
crew change office. It was a wonderful sight. Wish there had been digital
recorders back then!

Jerry Michels


Guy Wilber
 

Doug Harding wrote:

"Now for some questions:

1) Was the paper on the inside or outside of the car? I would speculate
the outside, otherwise the hogs would rip it off and harm themselves with
whatever fastener was used to hold the paper in place (staples?)."


I can't imagine the task of papering the outside of a single sheathed car and would tend to believe the cars were lined on the inside. Additionally, covering up the reporting marks and car data would enter into the equation. From AAR Freight Claims Bulletin No. 1110 (October of 1951); "During periods of stormy or severe cold weather the side of the car should be lined (up to four feet or more in height) with heavy paper, or battened in order to provide additional protection. This prevents a draft on the animals and raises the temperature of the car considerably." I would interpret "lined" as being inside the car."



"2) Would the paper have been similar to the paper later used in grain
doors? Or was it felt paper, ie 15lb rolled roofing paper, which was
commonly used to weather proof buildings, esp before siding was installed."


Very similar to the heavy rolled paper which was used for lining and padding cars far in advance of paper grain doors. Paper grain doors were double layered with steel banding embedded between the layers. There is little chance that roofing felt was used inside a stock car.


"3) Did they use slats or lath to keep the paper in place?"


Lath may have been used, the paper could have been stapled, nailed with felt or umbrella nails or, as was highly recommended by the early 1950s for paper lining, it could have been taped.



"5) Why reuse the same cars? If they can paper one car, they can paper
any car."


Why go to the added expense of papering more cars when you already had enough to serve the purpose? Again, it wasn't a requirement to clean and re-bed stock cars after each unloading.


Guy Wilber
Sparks, Nevada













[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


John Barry
 

As long as the same animals are using the car.

Shippers did not want their stock contaminated by soiled bedding from another stock owner. According to a clinc that Steve Sandifer presented at teh ATSFRRH&MS convention this summer, it was typical for cars to wait and reload their stock to mimimize the labor and materials used for a given shipment.

John Barry

--- In STMFC@..., Guy Wilber <guycwilber@...> wrote:




Doug Harding wrote:

"Now for some questions:

1) Was the paper on the inside or outside of the car? I would speculate
the outside, otherwise the hogs would rip it off and harm themselves with
whatever fastener was used to hold the paper in place (staples?)."


I can't imagine the task of papering the outside of a single sheathed car and would tend to believe the cars were lined on the inside. Additionally, covering up the reporting marks and car data would enter into the equation. From AAR Freight Claims Bulletin No. 1110 (October of 1951); "During periods of stormy or severe cold weather the side of the car should be lined (up to four feet or more in height) with heavy paper, or battened in order to provide additional protection. This prevents a draft on the animals and raises the temperature of the car considerably." I would interpret "lined" as being inside the car."



"2) Would the paper have been similar to the paper later used in grain
doors? Or was it felt paper, ie 15lb rolled roofing paper, which was
commonly used to weather proof buildings, esp before siding was installed."


Very similar to the heavy rolled paper which was used for lining and padding cars far in advance of paper grain doors. Paper grain doors were double layered with steel banding embedded between the layers. There is little chance that roofing felt was used inside a stock car.


"3) Did they use slats or lath to keep the paper in place?"


Lath may have been used, the paper could have been stapled, nailed with felt or umbrella nails or, as was highly recommended by the early 1950s for paper lining, it could have been taped.



"5) Why reuse the same cars? If they can paper one car, they can paper
any car."


Why go to the added expense of papering more cars when you already had enough to serve the purpose? Again, it wasn't a requirement to clean and re-bed stock cars after each unloading.


Guy Wilber
Sparks, Nevada













[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Douglas Harding
 

Thanks Guy. That adds to my knowledge of operations related to stockcars.



Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org


Guy Wilber
 

John Barry wrote:

As long as the same animals are using the car.

Shippers did not want their stock contaminated by soiled bedding from another stock owner. According to a clinc that Steve Sandifer presented at teh ATSFRRH&MS convention this summer, it was typical for cars to wait and reload their stock to mimimize the labor and materials used for a given shipment.


John,

I missed this post, but am curious what contamination(s) you are referring to?

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Steve SANDIFER
 

Santa Fe's practice was to reload the same stock into the same car they arrived in after feeding and resting. The exception was when stock came in a foreign road car and might leave in a Santa Fe car. Unless the bedding was exceptionally dirty, it was not changed at the feeding station.

Other railroads may have operated differently.
______________
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@...
Home: 12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX 77025, 713-667-9417

----- Original Message -----
From: Guy Wilber
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, September 22, 2012 8:51 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Transporting Hogs On The UP



John Barry wrote:

> As long as the same animals are using the car.
>
> Shippers did not want their stock contaminated by soiled bedding from another stock owner. According to a clinc that Steve Sandifer presented at teh ATSFRRH&MS convention this summer, it was typical for cars to wait and reload their stock to mimimize the labor and materials used for a given shipment.
>
>
>
John,

I missed this post, but am curious what contamination(s) you are referring to?

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada
>
>

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Gene <bierglaeser@...>
 

Guy,
Disease for one thing. Livestock might inadvertently be shipped while carrying a communicable disease such as "shipping fever" in the case of the sheep that were to be my 4H project one year. They were quarantined, could only be sold for slaughter and could not be shipped with any other sheep. They went to Rath in Waterloo, Iowa.
Gene Green

--- In STMFC@..., Guy Wilber <guycwilber@...> wrote:
John,
I missed this post, but am curious what contamination(s) you are referring to?
Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada


Bruce Smith
 

Guy,

To add to Gene's explanation, "Shipping Fever Complex" is a respiratory disease complex caused by several organisms that is induced/exacerbated by stress and close quarters.

In general, the shipper worried about any secretions, oral, nasal, urine, feces. All were potential sources of diseases, including shipping fever as well as a variety of diarrheas and other nasties. Bedding cattle headed to market on bedding from other cattle being shipped is a definite no-no and could result in condemnation of the cargo should it get diseased, and claims agains the railroad.

regards
Bruce Smith, (VMD)
Auburn, AL

________________________________________
From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...] on behalf of Guy Wilber [guycwilber@...]
Sent: Saturday, September 22, 2012 8:51 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Transporting Hogs On The UP

John Barry wrote:

As long as the same animals are using the car.

Shippers did not want their stock contaminated by soiled bedding from another stock owner. According to a clinc that Steve Sandifer presented at teh ATSFRRH&MS convention this summer, it was typical for cars to wait and reload their stock to mimimize the labor and materials used for a given shipment.


John,

I missed this post, but am curious what contamination(s) you are referring to?

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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Thomas Baker
 

________________________________________

Was it an anomaly to transport hogs in a passenger baggage car? Back in the Eighties I interviewed a former station agent for the Chicago Great Western, who worked on the west end, Oelwein to Council Bluffs. He related that several times he and presumably the hog raiser led a hog or two up a ramp into a baggage car for transport. I never thought about it before, but I would assume that a hog worthy of transport in a baggage car was not headed to the butchering plant but would be used for breeding.

Tom


Douglas Harding
 

Tom, I believe I have seen a photo of livestock in a baggage car, so it is
not out of the realm of possibility. Breeding stock was certainly treated
differently than feed lot or market ready animals. Most generally such
animals were crated or secured with a halter rope, not allowed to roam
loose. And I just image the reaction to the hog manure that accompanied the
hog.



Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org