Topics

Freight Car Identification (was Stanchions)


David Payne
 

At the suggestion of one of the OSM members, I'm forwarding this to the
STMFC group.

The first car appears to be a covered gon used in hauling coil steel, but
what about the second one?

Thank you.

David Payne
Georgia



____________________________________
From: DavidCofGa@aol.com
To: OSCALEMODELERS@yahoogroups.com
CC: rad@nshore.org
Sent: 9/1/2012 5:42:54 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time
Subj: Freight Car Identification (was Stanchions)



Folks,

Looking past the stanchions of much discussion, can anyone identify the
first two cars in this cut; particularly the second one ...

_RailPictures.Net Photo: CRN 10 Carolina & Northwestern Alco RS-3 at
Greenville, South Carolina by Martin K OToole_
(http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=56465)

Thank you.

David Payne
Georgia


Larry Sexton
 

David,



I am fairly certain that the second car was a conversion of one of the
Central of NJ 52' war emergency gons originally built with wood sides.
Sometime after WWII some of the gons received steel sides and were converted
to hauling Seal Bins. Seal Bins were fabric and steel cable reinforced
rubber bags shaped similar to a net float(as opposed to a fishing float)
with a discharge valve at one end and a lifting lug at the other. The
reinforcing cables were attached to the lifting lug.



They were designed to carry plastic pellets used in plastic molding from the
manufacturer to the plastic molder. They could be thought of as the
precursor to bean bags. The ones transported in these gons were about 9'00"
diameter and about 10-12' high. The gon would deliver the full Seal Bins to
the plastic molder where they would be hoisted from the gon using an
overhead hoist and trolley system which would allow them to be moved into
the plant along the trolley track and them dumped into a hopper at the
process equipment. Based on feedback from 20 years ago, I believe some of
them lasted well into the early 70s in their original design use.



Some of those who served in Nam may remember seeing choppers air-lifting
similar ones carrying gas or diesel fuel in-country. The military also had
smaller ones that were approximately 1/3-1/4 as large. Hope this helps.



Larry Sexton



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
davidcofga@aol.com
Sent: Sunday, September 02, 2012 11:47 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Fwd: Freight Car Identification (was Stanchions)






At the suggestion of one of the OSM members, I'm forwarding this to the
STMFC group.

The first car appears to be a covered gon used in hauling coil steel, but
what about the second one?

Thank you.

David Payne
Georgia



____________________________________
From: DavidCofGa@aol.com <mailto:DavidCofGa%40aol.com>
To: OSCALEMODELERS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:OSCALEMODELERS%40yahoogroups.com>

CC: rad@nshore.org <mailto:rad%40nshore.org>
Sent: 9/1/2012 5:42:54 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time
Subj: Freight Car Identification (was Stanchions)

Folks,

Looking past the stanchions of much discussion, can anyone identify the
first two cars in this cut; particularly the second one ...

_RailPictures.Net Photo: CRN 10 Carolina & Northwestern Alco RS-3 at
Greenville, South Carolina by Martin K OToole_
(http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=56465)

Thank you.

David Payne
Georgia


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Sep 2, 2012, at 9:43 AM, Larry Sexton wrote:
I am fairly certain that the second car was a conversion of one of the
Central of NJ 52' war emergency gons originally built with wood sides.
Sometime after WWII some of the gons received steel sides and were
converted
to hauling Seal Bins....
I know absolutely zero about seal bins, but I'm pretty sure the car
in question wasn't originally a war emergency mill gondola. The
framing is all wrong, and the WE gons had fishbelly side framing
which was an inherent part of the car structure. It it was, in fact,
a rebuild, then it appears that little of the original car was used
except perhaps the center sills, bolsters, and trucks.

Richard Hendrickson


Larry Sexton
 

After another look, I have to agree that the car in question doesn't match
the photos of the rebuilt C of NJ 52' gons. However, I still think this car
was originally designed to transport Seal Bins based on the rounded raised
ends. The C of NJ rebuilt gons carried 7 rubber bins. Per the January 1969
ORER, the OTDX corporation operated 99 of the 52' container cars and 48 of
the 75' gons which carried 10 Seal Bins.



There is no reference in the ORER to any shorter container cars of this
type, which this gon appears to be based on the rounded ends and middle
panels. Absent of any identification information, it appears to be a
shortened ex-container car that is being used to transport coal.





The most knowledgeable person on the Seal Bin cars is probably Craig
Bossler.



Larry Sexton

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Richard Hendrickson
Sent: Sunday, September 02, 2012 1:03 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Fwd: Freight Car Identification (was Stanchions)





On Sep 2, 2012, at 9:43 AM, Larry Sexton wrote:
I am fairly certain that the second car was a conversion of one of the
Central of NJ 52' war emergency gons originally built with wood sides.
Sometime after WWII some of the gons received steel sides and were
converted
to hauling Seal Bins....
I know absolutely zero about seal bins, but I'm pretty sure the car
in question wasn't originally a war emergency mill gondola. The
framing is all wrong, and the WE gons had fishbelly side framing
which was an inherent part of the car structure. It it was, in fact,
a rebuild, then it appears that little of the original car was used
except perhaps the center sills, bolsters, and trucks.

Richard Hendrickson


Richard Townsend
 

In one of Wayner's oft-maligned "Freight Car Pictorial" books there is a ACF builder's photo of SHPX 3457 which appears to be a match for the car in question. Built date appears to be 2-61 so it might be a car of the future. The caption says it was built to carry "Sealdbins" each with 10,000 pounds of plastic pellets.


Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon


Steven D Johnson
 

The 1961 Car and Locomotive Cyclopedia has photos three photo of those cars
on page 162 – SHPX 3544 and 3457, plus one an unpainted/unlettered car.
They are 70-ton Hitch Hiker Bag Container cars for polyethylene pellets.
The description says “each car has two end compartments with capacity for
three bags and one middle compartment with a capacity for four bags or a
total of 10 bags per car” and “each bag is 7 ft. 6 in. diameter by 8 ft. 0
in. high.” Length is given as 85 ft. 0 in, light weight 80,000 lbs., load
limit 130,000 lbs. The ¾ view of car 3457 shows a large “PETROTHENE” sign
mounted on the car side.



Hope this helps.



Steve Johnson



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Larry Sexton
Sent: Sunday, September 02, 2012 11:44 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Fwd: Freight Car Identification (was Stanchions)





David,

I am fairly certain that the second car was a conversion of one of the
Central of NJ 52' war emergency gons originally built with wood sides.
Sometime after WWII some of the gons received steel sides and were converted
to hauling Seal Bins. Seal Bins were fabric and steel cable reinforced
rubber bags shaped similar to a net float(as opposed to a fishing float)
with a discharge valve at one end and a lifting lug at the other. The
reinforcing cables were attached to the lifting lug.

They were designed to carry plastic pellets used in plastic molding from the
manufacturer to the plastic molder. They could be thought of as the
precursor to bean bags. The ones transported in these gons were about 9'00"
diameter and about 10-12' high. The gon would deliver the full Seal Bins to
the plastic molder where they would be hoisted from the gon using an
overhead hoist and trolley system which would allow them to be moved into
the plant along the trolley track and them dumped into a hopper at the
process equipment. Based on feedback from 20 years ago, I believe some of
them lasted well into the early 70s in their original design use.

Some of those who served in Nam may remember seeing choppers air-lifting
similar ones carrying gas or diesel fuel in-country. The military also had
smaller ones that were approximately 1/3-1/4 as large. Hope this helps.

Larry Sexton

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf
Of
davidcofga@aol.com <mailto:davidcofga%40aol.com>
Sent: Sunday, September 02, 2012 11:47 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Fwd: Freight Car Identification (was Stanchions)

At the suggestion of one of the OSM members, I'm forwarding this to the
STMFC group.

The first car appears to be a covered gon used in hauling coil steel, but
what about the second one?

Thank you.

David Payne
Georgia

____________________________________
From: DavidCofGa@aol.com <mailto:DavidCofGa%40aol.com>
<mailto:DavidCofGa%40aol.com>
To: OSCALEMODELERS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:OSCALEMODELERS%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:OSCALEMODELERS%40yahoogroups.com>

CC: rad@nshore.org <mailto:rad%40nshore.org> <mailto:rad%40nshore.org>
Sent: 9/1/2012 5:42:54 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time
Subj: Freight Car Identification (was Stanchions)

Folks,

Looking past the stanchions of much discussion, can anyone identify the
first two cars in this cut; particularly the second one ...

_RailPictures.Net Photo: CRN 10 Carolina & Northwestern Alco RS-3 at
Greenville, South Carolina by Martin K OToole_
(http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=56465)

Thank you.

David Payne
Georgia

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


David Payne
 

Just wanted to thank everyone who had offered comments on the "mystery car"
...

Over on the OSCALEMODELERS yahoo group, Jim Martin offered the following
...

From another list. The 2nd car is a OTDX gondola. It was used in the carbon

black / rubber industry. Sorry have no photo links.


Turns out that this is what I was looking for since my question was
originally prompted by a friend commenting that the car looked like the cars
"that we switched into the Uniroyal Plant in Opelika, Alabama, and were carrying
carbon black."

Thanks again for everyone's interest.

David Payne