Boxcar Underside


Bob Chaparro <thecitrusbelt@...>
 

Here is a link to an image of a boxcar underside, circa 1915. Click on
the image to enlarge it. Any surprises here?

http://pasttensevancouver.tumblr.com/post/25540455933/boxcar1915
<http://pasttensevancouver.tumblr.com/post/25540455933/boxcar1915>

+++

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Benjamin Hom
 

Bob Chaparro asked:
"Here is a link to an image of a boxcar underside, circa 1915. Click on
the image to enlarge it. Any surprises here?"

http://pasttensevancouver.tumblr.com/post/25540455933/boxcar1915
<http://pasttensevancouver.tumblr.com/post/25540455933/boxcar1915>

No.  Should there be?


Ben Hom


Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:

Bob Chaparro asked:
"Here is a link to an image of a boxcar underside, circa 1915. Click on
the image to enlarge it. Any surprises here?"

http://pasttensevancouver.tumblr.com/post/25540455933/boxcar1915
<http://pasttensevancouver.tumblr.com/post/25540455933/boxcar1915>

No.  Should there be?


Ben Hom
We should send out a search party to look for the missing "draft gear boxes". :-)

Dennis


Richard Brennan <brennan8@...>
 

At 02:55 PM 11/2/2012, you wrote:
Here is a link to an image of a boxcar underside, circa 1915. Click on
the image to enlarge it. Any surprises here?

http://pasttensevancouver.tumblr.com/post/25540455933/boxcar1915
It is interesting how the main wooden sills have splayed apart beyond the right bolster...
by the twisting force that pulled out the coupler (and at least one of its springs).

Full record at:
<http://searcharchives.vancouver.ca/people-exploring-remains-of-freight-car-near-south-end-of-main-street-after-collision-with-street-car;rad>http://searcharchives.vancouver.ca/people-exploring-remains-of-freight-car-near-south-end-of-main-street-after-collision-with-street-car


--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------


Gene <bierglaeser@...>
 

The board through the turnbuckles is an interesting detail I've never seen modeled.

Gene Green


ronald parisi
 

Boards through turnbuckles on lots of harbor craft especially on the sets
of guy wires....never saw on train car before

Ron Parisi

On Fri, Nov 2, 2012 at 7:39 PM, Gene <bierglaeser@yahoo.com> wrote:

**


The board through the turnbuckles is an interesting detail I've never seen
modeled.

Gene Green

http://pasttensevancouver.tumblr.com/post/25540455933/boxcar1915


Jack Burgess
 

<The board through the turnbuckles is an interesting detail I've never
<seen modeled.
<
<Gene Green

If seen that detail on both prototype and model narrow gauge cars although
I'm sure how common it was.

Jack Burgess
Newark, CA


Doug Junda
 

6 truss rods on the car.

Doug


npin53
 

I've seen NP truss rod box cars with boards through the turnbuckles. Usually a board just through a pair. There is, or was anyway, a NP box car at the Illinois RR Museum that still had the boards in place. I may have a picture of it somewhere.

I've tried to model it, but things need to be lined up just perfect.

Aaron

<The board through the turnbuckles is an interesting detail I've never
<seen modeled.
<
<Gene Green

If seen that detail on both prototype and model narrow gauge cars although
I'm sure how common it was.

Jack Burgess
Newark, CA


Larry Wolohon
 

I believe that the board was placed in the turnbuckles was to keep them from turning or twisting on their own, I.E. to keep the tension in the truss rods as they, the turnbuckles, could/would twist & loosen on their own. You can see some prototype examples @ Durango on the Durango & Silverton , on the Cumbres & Toltec or in the Colorado Railroad Museum in Golden, Co.. Just look @ the 3 foot gauge former D&RGW freight cars, they mostly have these boards in their turnbuckles. I have put some of these in on some of my GN Trussrod box cars. For HO scale this requires a rather small cross section of bass wood & the truss rods to be open in the center.

Larry Wolohon/Former 3' gauge modeler

----- Original Message -----
From: "Aaron Gjermundson" <npin53@hotmail.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, November 2, 2012 9:25:33 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Boxcar Underside






I've seen NP truss rod box cars with boards through the turnbuckles. Usually a board just through a pair. There is, or was anyway, a NP box car at the Illinois RR Museum that still had the boards in place. I may have a picture of it somewhere.

I've tried to model it, but things need to be lined up just perfect.

Aaron

<The board through the turnbuckles is an interesting detail I've never
<seen modeled.
<
<Gene Green

If seen that detail on both prototype and model narrow gauge cars although
I'm sure how common it was.

Jack Burgess
Newark, CA



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Bill Daniels <billinsf@...>
 

I've done this on On3 models I've built... in O scale it's not difficult. Usually it's a 1x4 board that is held in place with a couple of cotter pins on the inside of the turnbuckle.

Bill Daniels
San Francisco, CA
On Nov 2, 2012, at 4:39 PM, "Gene" <bierglaeser@yahoo.com> wrote:

The board through the turnbuckles is an interesting detail I've never seen modeled.

Gene Green

http://pasttensevancouver.tumblr.com/post/25540455933/boxcar1915

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


rwitt_2000
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:


Here is a link to an image of a boxcar underside, circa 1915. Click
on
the image to enlarge it. Any surprises here?

http://pasttensevancouver.tumblr.com/post/25540455933/boxcar1915
<http://pasttensevancouver.tumblr.com/post/25540455933/boxcar1915>
All the comments have been excellent, but I will note that the photo may
be from 1915, but the construction methods date from 10 to 15 years
earlier. By 1915 many railroads would be adding steel center sills to
such underframes if they intended to keep operating the cars.

Can others determine if the body bolsters are cast iron or steel. It
definitely does not appear to have metal draft gear

Regards,

Bob Witt


Eric Hansmann
 

I went to the link and clicked on the magnifying glass for a larger view. Then I increased my browser magnification to 400% (on the IE browser menu, click on View > Zoom).

There seem to be metal elements bolted to the bolster beams, but the actual beams may be wood. I initially thought the bolsters were cast pieces, but I now think these are wood parts.

The longitudinal beams of the car all look to be similar and I would guess it is a wood underframe with no steel upgrades to this point.

Eric


Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "rwitt_2000" <rwitt_2000@...> wrote:

All the comments have been excellent, but I will note that the photo may
be from 1915, but the construction methods date from 10 to 15 years
earlier. By 1915 many railroads would be adding steel center sills to
such underframes if they intended to keep operating the cars.

Can others determine if the body bolsters are cast iron or steel. It
definitely does not appear to have metal draft gear
<http://pasttensevancouver.tumblr.com/post/25540455933/boxcar1915>

Regards,

Bob Witt


Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Eric" <eric@...> wrote:

I went to the link and clicked on the magnifying glass for a larger view. Then I increased my browser magnification to 400% (on the IE browser menu, click on View > Zoom).

There seem to be metal elements bolted to the bolster beams, but the actual beams may be wood. I initially thought the bolsters were cast pieces, but I now think these are wood parts.

The longitudinal beams of the car all look to be similar and I would guess it is a wood underframe with no steel upgrades to this point.

Eric
I disagree. If the bolsters were wood, they would be solid plank, with tension rods (little truss rods) that ran from the bottom outer ends up over the center sills, and down to the other end. From the lighting it is clear there is nothing running in the space over the bolsters between the sills. Keep in mind, the body bolster has to bear all the weight those other sills support, plus the weight of the sills themselves, and transmit it to the center plate, so they need to be the stiffest part of the underframe.

Early iron or steel bolsters were often a top and bottom cover plate, riveted together at the ends and separated into a shallow truss by cast iron spools in the center. That's certainly not what we are seeing here. These are either separate steel castings (two per bolster) or early use of steel pressings, with the flanges facing outward, connected by partial cover plates at the center, ends, and above the side bearings. Note the location of the fasteners on the cover plates, they are along the edge where they can go through the flange on the piece that makes the bolster web. Good timber framing practice would have them centered on the wood members, as all the bolts coming through the wood sills are.

Dennis