Partly About Tangent Underframes, but More about weathering the deck


Charles Hostetler <cesicjh@...>
 

Good Evening,

I've posted a few shots of the Tangent underframes because my models just arrived, I was curious about the thread, and I wanted to try some close-up photography. Those interested can see the results here, and perhaps this will help some folks make their own judgments...

http://cnwmodeling.blogspot.com/2012/12/tangent-underframes.html


I'm really interested in weathering the deck. My weathering efforts to date have mostly been on replacement level models, and I'm a bit daunted by the thought of not doing justice to the model. So far I've been working with acrylic washes and trying to gain experience and control. I've also spent some time looking at photos of flat car decks. These decks would only be a little over a year old in October 1957, so I want something a bit subtle.

I am thinking of a very light shading with a variety of prisma color pencils before an acrylic wash. I'd appreciate any words of encouragement or suggestions.

Regards,

Charles Hostetler


Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

<Good Evening,
<
<I've posted a few shots of the Tangent underframes because my models
<just arrived, I was curious about the thread, and I wanted to try some
<close-up photography. Those interested can see the results here, and
<perhaps this will help some folks make their own judgments...
<
<http://cnwmodeling.blogspot.com/2012/12/tangent-underframes.html
<
<
<I'm really interested in weathering the deck. My weathering efforts to
<date have mostly been on replacement level models, and I'm a bit daunted
<by the thought of not doing justice to the model. So far I've been
<working with acrylic washes and trying to gain experience and control.
<I've also spent some time looking at photos of flat car decks. These
<decks would only be a little over a year old in October 1957, so I want
<something a bit subtle.
<
<I am thinking of a very light shading with a variety of prisma color
<pencils before an acrylic wash. I'd appreciate any words of
<encouragement or suggestions.
<
<Regards,
<
<Charles Hostetler

Charles...

Stan Rydarowicz had a good article on painting styrene wooded freight car
floors in the February 2006 issue of RMC...


Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

I'm really interested in weathering the deck
While more weathered than you probably want I still find the Tichy
flat car instruction sheet very good for plastic decks.

--
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax--Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Jack Burgess wrote:
Stan Rydarowicz had a good article on painting styrene wooded freight car floors in the February 2006 issue of RMC...
Stan's article is good. I would emphasize the need to seriously distress the floor if the gondola is more than a few years old. I did a post in my blog awhile back about flat car decks, which applies equally to wood gondola floors. It can be found at:

http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2011/05/weathering-flat-car-decks.html

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Tangent Scale Models
 

--- In STMFC@..., Jon Miller <atsf@...> wrote:


I'm really interested in weathering the deck
While more weathered than you probably want I still find the Tichy
flat car instruction sheet very good for plastic decks.
One of my personal favorite weathering guides for plastic flatcar decks is Richard Hendrickson's article from the January 1997 RailModel Journal. A link can be found here:

http://www.trainlife.com/magazines/pages/365/26796/january-1997-page-50

Best wishes,

David Lehlbach
Tangent Scale Models


Jim Betz
 

Charles,

Even after only a year or so the basic color would be grey. The
difference for a newer deck will be "how much more brown overtones
do you apply?".
- Jim


Charles Hostetler <cesicjh@...>
 

Thanks Jack, Jon, Tony, David, and Jim,

As I've reviewed the materials that have been recommended, they all emphasize distressing (in a fine and controlled way) the wooden flooring. I think my basic starting issue with the gons and the GSC flats is how do I do this distressing on a built up model? For the gons its mostly how do I get into the sides and corners. And for the GSC flats, how do I get into those small end panels? I don't want to distress "grain" into the steel members.

I want to avoid a vignetting effect where my distressing looks like a sort of rounded spot inside of a frame...

A secondary issue is having the weathering agent/color for the wood keep off of the steel members, but I think with acrylics that should wash off pretty easily if I mess up a bit?

Thanks,

Charles Hostetler


Scott H. Haycock
 

Charles,
You might try simulating the distressing with some drybrushing. A darker version of your base color would simulate the shadows of the distressing, which is what you see anyway. a few larger cracks could be carved in with a hobby knife, and the finercracks could be simulated.




Scott Haycock
Modeling Tarheel country in the Land of Enchantm ent

----- Original Message -----





Thanks Jack, Jon, Tony, David, and Jim,

As I've reviewed the materials that have been recommended, they all emphasize distressing (in a fine and controlled way) the wooden flooring. I think my basic starting issue with the gons and the GSC flats is how do I do this distressing on a built up model? For the gons its mostly how do I get into the sides and corners. And for the GSC flats, how do I get into those small end panels? I don't want to distress "grain" into the steel members.

I want to avoid a vignetting effect where my distressing looks like a sort of rounded spot inside of a frame...

A secondary issue is having the weathering agent/color for the wood keep off of the steel members, but I think with acrylics that should wash off pretty easily if I mess up a bit?

Thanks,

Charles Hostetler


midrly <midrly@...>
 

This discussion reminds me of an Erie R.R. Proto 52' gon kit that I bought just after it came out. Distressed the sides a little, weathered up the floor thinking that I did a nice job on the "wood flooring".

Took it to a local RPM meet, where a well-known modeller on this list said to me--"You do know that those cars had a nailable steel floor?"

Consultation back at home with the ORER that I should have looked at in the first place proved him correct. As I slapped my forehead with my palm...

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., "Charles Hostetler" <cesicjh@...> wrote:

Good Evening,

I've posted a few shots of the Tangent underframes because my models just arrived, I was curious about the thread, and I wanted to try some close-up photography. Those interested can see the results here, and perhaps this will help some folks make their own judgments...

http://cnwmodeling.blogspot.com/2012/12/tangent-underframes.html


I'm really interested in weathering the deck. My weathering efforts to date have mostly been on replacement level models, and I'm a bit daunted by the thought of not doing justice to the model. So far I've been working with acrylic washes and trying to gain experience and control. I've also spent some time looking at photos of flat car decks. These decks would only be a little over a year old in October 1957, so I want something a bit subtle.

I am thinking of a very light shading with a variety of prisma color pencils before an acrylic wash. I'd appreciate any words of encouragement or suggestions.

Regards,

Charles Hostetler


Tim O'Connor
 

The first Tangent gondolas I received ha d easily removable floors -- but in the latest batch that
I got, the floors seem to be glued in place. This bums me out because I like to remove the floors
to paint and weather them, since as you point out they may be made of different materials than
the car. Has anyone else had problems trying to dislodge the floor from a Tangent gondola?

Tim O'Connor

----- Original Message -----
From: "midrly" <midrly@...>

This discussion reminds me of an Erie R.R. Proto 52' gon kit that I bought just after it came out. Distressed the sides a little, weathered up the floor thinking that I did a nice job on the "wood flooring".
Took it to a local RPM meet, where a well-known modeller on this list said to me--"You do know that those cars had a nailable steel floor?"
Consultation back at home with the ORER that I should have looked at in the first place proved him correct. As I slapped my forehead with my palm...

Steve Lucas.