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HO scale model guide for 1920s era freight cars


Eric Hansmann
 

After a few months of discussion, a few friends and I have compiled a guide to plastic HO scale freight cars that were a part of the national fleet during the 1920s. Most of the guide can be useful for anyone modeling before WW2. Details can be found here:

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/a-guide-to-1920s-era-ho-scale-plastic-freight-cars/

Three main criteria were set for inclusion on this guide.
- Currently available
- Injection molded plastic model
- Requiring minimal upgrades to resemble prototypes

This guide will be updated as new models are introduced and others are deleted. Any recommendations of additional models or prototypes suggestions would be appreciated.

I hope modelers find these details useful in contemplating an earlier modeling focus.

Eric


Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX


s shaffer
 

Subject: [STMFC] HO scale model guide for 1920s era freight cars


After a few months of discussion, a few friends and I have compiled a guide to plastic HO scale freight cars that were a part of the national fleet during the 1920s. Most of the guide can be useful for anyone modeling before WW2. Details can be found here:

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/a-guide-to-1920s-era-ho-scale-plastic-freight-cars/

Three main criteria were set for inclusion on this guide.
- Currently available
- Injection molded plastic model
- Requiring minimal upgrades to resemble prototypes

This guide will be updated as new models are introduced and others are deleted. Any recommendations of additional models or prototypes suggestions would be appreciated.
Hi Eric, it was nice to talk to you at the meet Saturday afternoon. Saturday night I was looking at your website/blog and happened upon your freightcar list. I suggest the criteria "Currently available" could be better defined. I think the P2k 40' Mather Stock Car could be included in your list. Walthers lists it as being available June 2013, but I would have no trouble finding a past production run model to buy.

At the meet yesterday, Eric gave a motivating presentation on weathering. Eric is the second person on this list that I have met in person. The first was Gene Green, he came to the local club open house during the Southern New Mexico State Fair some years ago, but I did not get to talk to him much. I like to help out during the Fair and had spotted a youth that showed more than a passing interest in model railroading. I had given the kid the delux tour of the layout and was showing him how to lubricate and clean the wheels of a locomotive model (yeh it was a modern diesel) when Gene came by. Later I brought a mainline train in and the kid (Justin was his name) cut the locomotives off, ran them into the service area and brought out the string we had just serviced. He then ran the train out of Belen yard onto the main.

You cannot get a kid interested in Steam Era Freight Cars till you get them hooked on Model Railroading.
Steve Shaffer


Eric Hansmann
 

Steve,

Thanks for your comments on the 1920s model guide. I was tempted to include the Proto2000 Mather box and stock car models, but I believe these models follow prototype designs that Mather built in the 1930s. The company was buildng stock and box cars before then, but most of those were built to a 36-foot length. The Proto2000 models both represent 40-foot cars.

Check the February 1997 Railmodel Journal Stock Car info. Page 26 and 27 offer the detail the matches the prototype with the model. Here's a direct link:

http://trainlife.com/magazines/pages/366/26850/february-1997-page-24

The August 2003 RMJ featured a Mather box cars article and the Proto2000 models.

http://trainlife.com/magazines/pages/174/12639/august-2003-page-45

While there were Mather prototype box, stock, and refrigerator cars operating in the 1920s, I don't believe there is an HO scale, plastic model currently available that matches prototypes in use during the 1920s. I wish there were.

And thanks for your comments on the weathering presentation at the NMRA meeting. I enjoyed the questions and conversations that followed.

Eric


Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "sshaffer" wrote:

Subject: [STMFC] HO scale model guide for 1920s era freight cars


After a few months of discussion, a few friends and I have compiled a
guide to plastic HO scale freight cars that were a part of the national
fleet during the 1920s. Most of the guide can be useful for anyone
modeling before WW2. Details can be found here:

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/a-guide-to-1920s-era-ho-scale-plastic-freight-cars/

Three main criteria were set for inclusion on this guide.
- Currently available
- Injection molded plastic model
- Requiring minimal upgrades to resemble prototypes

This guide will be updated as new models are introduced and others are
deleted. Any recommendations of additional models or prototypes
suggestions would be appreciated.
Hi Eric, it was nice to talk to you at the meet Saturday afternoon.
Saturday night I was looking at your website/blog and happened upon your
freightcar list. I suggest the criteria "Currently available" could be
better defined. I think the P2k 40' Mather Stock Car could be included in
your list. Walthers lists it as being available June 2013, but I would have
no trouble finding a past production run model to buy.

At the meet yesterday, Eric gave a motivating presentation on weathering.


Steve SANDIFER
 

The Intermountain Santa Fe SK-Q-U stock cars are from the late 20s.
Q - 1928
R - 1928
S - 1929
T - 1930
U - 1930

For precision, only the K brake SK-R is accurate for your time period. The Q and S have incorrect sides and the Q incorrect doors. I have not seen a K brake version of the S,T or U since they came with Ajax geared brakes and Intermountain only models those with AB brakes. But with their kits, anything is possible.

Intermountain seems able to paint anything any scheme without concern for correctness. Note their SK-R http://www.intermountain-railway.com/ho/html/47906.htm on the website. K brakes, A.T.&S.F logo - all pre 1938. Then they add the scotchlight reflector from 1958. I can't tell what the reweigh dates are.
______________
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@sbcglobal.net
Home: 12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX 77025, 713-667-9417

----- Original Message -----
From: Eric
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, January 13, 2013 7:55 PM
Subject: [STMFC] HO scale model guide for 1920s era freight cars



After a few months of discussion, a few friends and I have compiled a guide to plastic HO scale freight cars that were a part of the national fleet during the 1920s. Most of the guide can be useful for anyone modeling before WW2. Details can be found here:

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/a-guide-to-1920s-era-ho-scale-plastic-freight-cars/

Three main criteria were set for inclusion on this guide.
- Currently available
- Injection molded plastic model
- Requiring minimal upgrades to resemble prototypes

This guide will be updated as new models are introduced and others are deleted. Any recommendations of additional models or prototypes suggestions would be appreciated.

I hope modelers find these details useful in contemplating an earlier modeling focus.

Eric

Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX


Benjamin Hom
 

Eric Hansmann wrote:
"After a few months of discussion, a few friends and I have compiled a guide to
plastic HO scale freight cars that were a part of the national fleet during the
1920s. Most of the guide can be useful for anyone modeling before WW2. Details
can be found here:
http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/a-guide-to-1920s-era-ho-scale-plastic-freight-cars/


Three main criteria were set for inclusion on this guide.
- Currently available
- Injection molded plastic model
- Requiring minimal upgrades to resemble prototypes"

Eric, depending on how you define "minimal upgrades" (as well as having to
backdate lettering), the much copied ARA offset quad was introduced in 1926. 
The pros and cons of each HO scale model is another article in the works that I
have to finish for The B&O Modeler - quick summary as follows:

Note: None of these models have Duryea Cushion Underframes.  All except MTH
model have typical "1950s detailing standards" (molded on grabs/ladders, overly
large sill steps and brakewheels, talgo trucks/X2F couplers, and rudimentary
brake details.  All models offered in far more many fantasy paint schemes than
the prototype.)

Athearn: Details more closely match B&O W-2 and subclass cars with ladders vice
grabs.  Model has overly thick operating hopper doors.

AHM/Life-Like/Model Power/Tyco: Close copy of Athearn model.  Early AHM models
imported from Roco have operating doors; later AHM models and all Life-Like,
Model Power, and Tyco models lack operating doors but have fishbelly underframe
not representative of prototype.

Cox/Bachmann:  Poor copy of Athearn model.  Details are coarse, particularly
"splice/doubler" plates at bolsters and between hoppers.

MTH: Contrary to reports by some members of this and other lists, NOT a direct
copy of the Athearn tooling.  Details also more closely matches B&O W-2 and
subclasses but nowhere near as coarse.  Only detailing issue that jumps out
during cursory examination is the lack of hopper door detail.


See RPCyc Vols. 5 and 14 for more information on the prototypes.


Ben Hom


Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "sshaffer" wrote:

Subject: [STMFC] HO scale model guide for 1920s era freight cars


After a few months of discussion, a few friends and I have compiled a
guide to plastic HO scale freight cars that were a part of the national
fleet during the 1920s. Most of the guide can be useful for anyone
modeling before WW2. Details can be found here:

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/a-guide-to-1920s-era-ho-scale-plastic-freight-cars/

Three main criteria were set for inclusion on this guide.
- Currently available
- Injection molded plastic model
- Requiring minimal upgrades to resemble prototypes
A little expansion on the Accurail listings... the 2400 series are supposed to be USRA "as built" lettering schemes. Most of our cars have the post 1926 dimensional data arrangement, because it remained pretty consistent through the popular WWII and steam to diesel transition modeling eras. But we do recognize that some people model the early twenties, so offer lettering correct for that era from time to time. The 2500 series cars pack with ARA Cast ("Bettendorf") trucks, while the 2400 series kits come with Andrews. Unfortunately, we are not able to offer K brakes, but substituting an after market reservoir and triple valve while using our brake cylinder does the job.

We have also done some pre 1926 lettering schemes on our 4600 USRA boxcar kits, but since all those kits pack with Andrews trucks, we haven't differentiated them by SKU number series. Since we have images of all our lettering at:

http://accurail.com/accurail/

This shouldn't be a problem. We've recently produced a run of Data Only boxcars with the original data arrangement:

http://accurail.com/accurail/art/4600/4697.jpg

Dennis Storzek
Accurail, Inc.


Eric Hansmann
 

Thank you for the details, Steve. I've added a notation to the 1920 Freight Car Guide.

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/a-guide-to-1920s-era-ho-scale-plastic-freight-cars/

Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Sandifer" wrote:

The Intermountain Santa Fe SK-Q-U stock cars are from the late 20s.
Q - 1928
R - 1928
S - 1929
T - 1930
U - 1930

For precision, only the K brake SK-R is accurate for your time period. The Q and S have incorrect sides and the Q incorrect doors. I have not seen a K brake version of the S,T or U since they came with Ajax geared brakes and Intermountain only models those with AB brakes. But with their kits, anything is possible.

Intermountain seems able to paint anything any scheme without concern for correctness. Note their SK-R http://www.intermountain-railway.com/ho/html/47906.htm on the website. K brakes, A.T.&S.F logo - all pre 1938. Then they add the scotchlight reflector from 1958. I can't tell what the reweigh dates are.
______________
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@...
Home: 12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX 77025, 713-667-9417


Eric Hansmann
 

Thank you for the Accurail details, Dennis. I've incorporated several of your points into the listings on the 1920 Freight Car Model Guide.

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/a-guide-to-1920s-era-ho-scale-plastic-freight-cars/


Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "soolinehistory" wrote:
A little expansion on the Accurail listings... the 2400 series are supposed to be USRA "as built" lettering schemes. Most of our cars have the post 1926 dimensional data arrangement, because it remained pretty consistent through the popular WWII and steam to diesel transition modeling eras. But we do recognize that some people model the early twenties, so offer lettering correct for that era from time to time. The 2500 series cars pack with ARA Cast ("Bettendorf") trucks, while the 2400 series kits come with Andrews. Unfortunately, we are not able to offer K brakes, but substituting an after market reservoir and triple valve while using our brake cylinder does the job.

We have also done some pre 1926 lettering schemes on our 4600 USRA boxcar kits, but since all those kits pack with Andrews trucks, we haven't differentiated them by SKU number series. Since we have images of all our lettering at:

http://accurail.com/accurail/

This shouldn't be a problem. We've recently produced a run of Data Only boxcars with the original data arrangement:

http://accurail.com/accurail/art/4600/4697.jpg

Dennis Storzek
Accurail, Inc.


Eric Hiser <ehiser@...>
 

Eric:
Thanks for the resources on 1920s cars. Much appreciated by this
1920s modeler!
Eric Hiser
Phoenix