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WIMP?

Stephen Bishop
 

In the new issue of the New Haven Shoreliner (NHRHTA) there is a photo of a New Haven DEY-3 (S-1) switching a reefer on which is written in large letters"WIMP Packing Company" Can anyone tell me about WIMP?  The photo is dated September 28, 1957.

Steve Bishop

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Richard Hendrickson
 

On May 17, 2013, at 11:11 AM, Stephen Bishop <superlab2003@...> wrote:

In the new issue of the New Haven Shoreliner (NHRHTA) there is a photo of a New Haven DEY-3 (S-1) switching a reefer on which is written in large letters"WIMP Packing Company" Can anyone tell me about WIMP? The photo is dated September 28, 1957.

Steve, I doubt that WIMP is still in business, but it was a small family-owned packing house in Chicago that specialized in sausage. The name comes from the family that owned it. Roy Wimp was president and general manager.

Richard Hendrickson

spsalso
 

Yup. WIMP's would go in varible density tunnels.

Knew it all along.



Ed

Edward Sutorik

geodyssey <riverob@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...> wrote:

On May 17, 2013, at 11:11 AM, Stephen Bishop <superlab2003@...> wrote:

In the new issue of the New Haven Shoreliner (NHRHTA) there is a photo of a New Haven DEY-3 (S-1) switching a reefer on which is written in large letters"WIMP Packing Company" Can anyone tell me about WIMP? The photo is dated September 28, 1957.

Steve, I doubt that WIMP is still in business, but it was a small family-owned packing house in Chicago that specialized in sausage. The name comes from the family that owned it. Roy Wimp was president and general manager.

Richard Hendrickson


Probably mild sausage.

Robert Simpson

Charles Hostetler
 

Steve, I doubt that WIMP is still in business, but it was a small family-owned packing house in Chicago that specialized in sausage. The name comes from the family that owned it. Roy Wimp was president and general manager.

Richard Hendrickson

Wimp Packing Co. was in business at least until 1958, and probably until the end of time (at least as it relates to this group). I put together a brief profile including an aerial view of the plant taken in 1952 that those interested can find here:

http://cnwmodeling.blogspot.com/2013/05/wimp-packing-co.html

They were located just south of the Chicago Stockyards and probably got their raw materials by local truck delivery; but they did ship sausage, bone, and blood by rail. The serving carrier was the IHB but they were located in the Chicago Switching District so the IHB was in general not likely to have been the OLHC.

I noticed on the Sanborn map (which was updated through 1950) that there was a set of brine tanks next to the shipping coolers. I've read a bit about how the fruit packing houses had different ways to bring the heat off fruit - was there an equivalent set of methods for brine reefers? Did protective services for RAMs and RSMs follow procedures similar to those for RS?

Regards,

Charles Hostetler

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

So it doesn't stand for Weakly Interacting Massive Particle??

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

Mike Smeltzer
 

Doing a quick google search I found a reference to a book titled "Directory of the Bureau of Animal Industry" Goverment Printing 1922 on Google books. Shows Wimp Packaging Company located at 1119-1127 West 47th Place Chicago. The reference also indicates that this facility conducts slaughtering.


http://books.google.com/books?id=q4XNAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA56&lpg=PA56&dq=WIMP+Packing+Company&source=bl&ots=trhsFcKeKz&sig=98hsqBUqOew3KugtmS32TBqLeVo&hl=en&sa=X&ei=at-WUauBDsT4yQGd3oCgAw&ved=0CFAQ6AEwBg#v=onepage&q=WIMP%20Packing%20Company&f=false

Mike Smeltzer

-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Fri, May 17, 2013 1:49 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] WIMP?






On May 17, 2013, at 11:11 AM, Stephen Bishop <superlab2003@...> wrote:

In the new issue of the New Haven Shoreliner (NHRHTA) there is a photo of a New Haven DEY-3 (S-1) switching a reefer on which is written in large letters"WIMP Packing Company" Can anyone tell me about WIMP? The photo is dated September 28, 1957.

Steve, I doubt that WIMP is still in business, but it was a small family-owned packing house in Chicago that specialized in sausage. The name comes from the family that owned it. Roy Wimp was president and general manager.

Richard Hendrickson

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Douglas Harding
 

Charles, Armour and other packers used brine tank equipped reefers, which
contained the salt melt, until the tanks could be drained at a facility
equipped to handle the salt ladened ice melt. I know the Decker plant in
Mason City (owned by Armour) pre-cooled their reefers by circulating a
chilled liquid through the brine tanks, then they iced the reefers as they
were being loaded at the loading dock. I assume this enabled faster cooling
and quicker turn around. The Decker plant had an ammonia based ice making
plant on site, which the no doubt used to also chill the liquid they used to
pre-cool.



Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

Charles Hostetler
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Douglas Harding" <doug.harding@...> wrote:

Charles, Armour and other packers used brine tank equipped reefers, which
contained the salt melt, until the tanks could be drained at a facility
equipped to handle the salt ladened ice melt. I know the Decker plant in
Mason City (owned by Armour) pre-cooled their reefers by circulating a
chilled liquid through the brine tanks, then they iced the reefers as they
were being loaded at the loading dock. I assume this enabled faster cooling
and quicker turn around. The Decker plant had an ammonia based ice making
plant on site, which the no doubt used to also chill the liquid they used to
pre-cool.



Doug Harding
Thanks Doug,

If I'm understanding you correctly, it would seem that the Decker plant basically got clean (but warm) RAMs and did everything necessary to cool them down and get them ready to go as they were being loaded. [Side issue - I wonder how they were re-iced along the way. I think of a standard icing dock as servicing a regular RS car, and I wonder whether that facility would have been equipped to deal with a RAM.]

With respect to Wimp, which seems like a smaller facility than Decker, I was wondering if they got an iced/brined car ready to go or whether they had to cool and brine the car at the plant. Andy Laurent and I looked at a waybill that shipped an empty (but iced) NWX RS from Green Bay to the A&W for loading, and this suggested to me that around the packing house districts there might be specialized icing facilities for RAMs that would precool and load the brine tanks before they were spotted for loading.

Regards,

Charles Hostetler

Douglas Harding
 

Charles, to clarify: meat reefers RAM's and RSM's were typically inspected
after each use, often at a car owner's facility. Mason City had a URTC
facility for doing inspections, repairs, etc. Decker leased their reefers
from URTC. In early years Decker cleaned on site. It is quite possible in
later years that URTC did the cleaning prior to delivery to the Decker
plant. But do understand all cars had to pass a USDA inspection at the plant
before they could be loaded, so meat packers were prepared and equipped to
clean reefers. Cars were cleaned with hot water, as steam warmed the
interiors too much, causing it to take too long to cool down.



As to icing, meat required colder temps then produce, so heavy amounts of
salt were used to reach the colder temps. Cars were typically iced every 24
hours. Many meat shippers specified crushed ice, ie fist sized chunks, which
mixed better with the salt. Crushed ice was typically delivered via a cart
using a tube or funnel from a deck well above the roof of the car. Ice Docks
set up to service meat reefers typically had two decks, one at car roof
height for normal icing with large blocks of ice and one a story above car
roof height for icing via carts. Not all ice docks had two decks. It appears
those located in areas that service fruit and produce were single deck and
those in areas that service a lot of meat reefers were double deck. While I
have no documentation to support this, photos marked with locations lead me
to make this statement.



Not every meat packer had on site icing facilities. Some received from the
railroad pre-cooled and iced reefers ready for loading. The Tobin/Morrell
plant in Estherville IA originally used the Rock Island ice dock in
Estherville to ice reefers, which were then delivered to the meat plant once
the car was cold. Later they built their own ice plant, so cars could be
iced on site. Other meat packers received cars that were iced elsewhere,
then delivered to their loading dock. This necessitated that the cars be top
iced before they could travel very far, ie at the nearest ice dock.



Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

Larry Sexton
 

Recently while doing research I found reference to Armour and Swift
providing hundreds of thousands, if not millions of one-pound tins of lard
for shipment to Europe during the period 1944-1949. Apparently the one pound
red/white& blue painted tins were included in the millions of CARE packages
shipped to Europe during that period. Larger 1-gallon and 5-gallon cans also
appear to have been shipped over as well, all in an attempt to augment the
calories and fats missing from the European diets during the post-war years.
All of these lard shipments appear to have originated in the Midwest at the
major packing plants, and were subsequently shipped via rail to the eastern
US ports for movement to Europe.



In 1946-47 there was an attempt to free up the wheat being used by Midwest
farmers as livestock feed for human consumption. This resulted in an
increased kill-off of hogs with a subsequent increase in railroad movement
of livestock to the slaughterhouses.



My question is whether anyone has knowledge of, or knows where there may be
Packers records regarding the volume of these shipments? I've thought about
contacting the various producers that are still in business, but that may
not fully capture all those providing lard for this effort. I am still
holding out hope that I may locate CCC records of these shipments. There may
even be documentation showing significant amounts of the lard was donated
for relief. If anyone has suggestions on how to find, retrieve or access
possible records or has contact info for any of these producers, please
contact me. It may be best to contact me off-line if you have any input.
Thanks much.



Larry Sexton

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Douglas Harding
Sent: Friday, May 17, 2013 10:43 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: WIMP?





Charles, Armour and other packers used brine tank equipped reefers, which
contained the salt melt, until the tanks could be drained at a facility
equipped to handle the salt ladened ice melt. I know the Decker plant in
Mason City (owned by Armour) pre-cooled their reefers by circulating a
chilled liquid through the brine tanks, then they iced the reefers as they
were being loaded at the loading dock. I assume this enabled faster cooling
and quicker turn around. The Decker plant had an ammonia based ice making
plant on site, which the no doubt used to also chill the liquid they used to
pre-cool.

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org