Airbrushing Resin Kits


radiodial868
 

While the spring loaded "expander" handle works fine for car bodies with removable shells, what does one use to hold assembled Westerfield and Sunshine models for spray-painting? Any tips?
Thx,
RJ Dial
Pleasanton, CA


Brian Carlson
 

I generally paint in stages underframe first, then put the model on "shop
Trucks" and paint the sitting on them in the booth. I don't have on but a
lazy-susan is useful too.



Brian J. Carlson, P.E.

Cheektowaga, NY



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
radiodial868
Sent: Saturday, May 25, 2013 7:27 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Airbrushing Resin Kits





While the spring loaded "expander" handle works fine for car bodies with
removable shells, what does one use to hold assembled Westerfield and
Sunshine models for spray-painting? Any tips?
Thx,
RJ Dial
Pleasanton, CA


Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

Some of us have made stands that attach with screws to the kingspins of the
car to be painted. This requires painting as a two step process. I paint the
underframe first, let it dry, attach the car to the stand, then paint the
rest of the car. I model the CB&Q, and most of my resin kits are house cars,
which are painted mineral read on all surfaces including trucks (which I
paint separately on a multi-truck jig). The stand stabilizes and elevates
the car, and when placed on a lazy Susan, can be rotated to access the
sides, ends, and roof of the car. I built my stand out of quarter inch
square styrene strips.



Nelson Moyer

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
radiodial868
Sent: Saturday, May 25, 2013 6:27 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Airbrushing Resin Kits





While the spring loaded "expander" handle works fine for car bodies with
removable shells, what does one use to hold assembled Westerfield and
Sunshine models for spray-painting? Any tips?
Thx,
RJ Dial
Pleasanton, CA


Bruce Smith
 

RJ,

Lotsa of different approaches can be used. Some flat kits I paint before assembly. This is especially useful as it allows good color separattion if needed and also allows you to decal both sides at the same time. Other approaches are to put a set of truck without wheels on and use those to hold the model right side up. Alternatively, you can use wood skewers stuck in a block of florist foam. To do the under bodies I usually just hold the car in one hand.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL
________________________________________
From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...] on behalf of radiodial868 [radiodial@...]
Sent: Saturday, May 25, 2013 6:27 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Airbrushing Resin Kits

While the spring loaded "expander" handle works fine for car bodies with removable shells, what does one use to hold assembled Westerfield and Sunshine models for spray-painting? Any tips?
Thx,
RJ Dial
Pleasanton, CA



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Bill Welch
 

I prefer painting the under frame and body of house cars separately and I use the cardboard tube from rolls of toilet paper with a loop of masking tape on both sides to keep it secured, which is easy because the weights are on the u/f. With open top and tank cars I use the green florist wire that comes with the F&C kits wrapped around the truck screws and then hang the model to dry.

I use Badger's Modelflex paint so if I spray the hand holding the cardboard tube or the wire, which I usually do, I just wash it off.

Speaking of paint, I used Accuflex paint from the get-go and was interested to hear Greg's history lesson on what happened to it. I am very happy with Modelflex although I have also used Polyscale and intend to go to my LHS and buy the colors I like from that line this week.

A few years ago I used Gray and Yellow Scalecoat paints custom mixed for Des Planes Hobbies to match the Clinchfield to paint two F5's and two GP7's and carefully dispensed what I needed each time, thinning it as I went. I barely finished painting the four models and the required slight touch-ups before the main bottles became unusable. Very frustrating. Ended up using a Tamiya yellow to do some stand off details I forgot to paint.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., "radiodial868" <radiodial@...> wrote:

While the spring loaded "expander" handle works fine for car bodies with removable shells, what does one use to hold assembled Westerfield and Sunshine models for spray-painting? Any tips?
Thx,
RJ Dial
Pleasanton, CA


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Brian Carlson wrote:
I generally paint in stages underframe first, then put the model on "shop Trucks" and paint the sitting on them in the booth. I don't have one but a lazy-susan is useful too.
I do the same. All my old roller bearing trucks live in the spray booth. I also use old kit box tops or bottoms for supporting pieces being painted.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Bill Welch wrote:
A few years ago I used Gray and Yellow Scalecoat paints custom mixed for Des Planes Hobbies to match the Clinchfield to paint two F5's and two GP7's and carefully dispensed what I needed each time, thinning it as I went. I barely finished painting the four models and the required slight touch-ups before the main bottles became unusable. Very frustrating. Ended up using a Tamiya yellow to do some stand off details I forgot to paint.
Having had the same experience a few times with Scalecoat, I quit using it years ago. The newer paints such as Tru-Color are quite nice and give a beautiful finish. I find myself using them more and more.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Joe Bower <jnbower1@...>
 

RJD.



I use a wire coat hanger, the type that has the horizontal paper tube.



Bend the Hook into a closed loop for the handle.



Pull the two wire ends out of the tube, and cut off about 5" of the wire.
File the ends to a smooth, rounded tip and slightly tapered so the tips can
slip into the Truck screw holes in the bolsters. Bend these arms to form a
"U" pointing up away from the handle, and equal to the span between the
bolsters on the car to be painted. (Make several "Holders", bent to fit the
spans of different length models)



If the legs of the "U" are separated by slightly more, or less than bolster
centers, the spring force should hold the models satisfactorily.



J. Bower.







_____

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
radiodial868
Sent: Saturday, May 25, 2013 7:27 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Airbrushing Resin Kits





While the spring loaded "expander" handle works fine for car bodies with
removable shells, what does one use to hold assembled Westerfield and
Sunshine models for spray-painting? Any tips?
Thx,
RJ Dial
Pleasanton, CA


Joseph
 

RJ,
see www.bobsworkbench.com for a holder I built following an article in RMC, also Bob Sterner's approach to the same idea.
joe binish

----- Original Message -----
From: "radiodial868" <radiodial@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Saturday, May 25, 2013 6:27 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Airbrushing Resin Kits


While the spring loaded "expander" handle works fine for car bodies with removable shells, what does one use to hold assembled Westerfield and Sunshine models for spray-painting? Any tips?
Thx,
RJ Dial
Pleasanton, CA



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



william darnaby
 

I paint the complete assembled model by painting the underbody, ends and roof
while holding the sides with my fingers.  Then I pick up a large electrical
alligator clip, about an inch plus long, and use it grab the centersill near the
car center for balance.  This is stable enough to hold the car for the remainder
of the painting process.  Some of the finer centersill castings tend to deflect
under the pressure of the jaws but this can be mitigated by placing a styrene
spacer between the cast channels to keep them from collapsing together.

Hope this helps,
Bill Darnaby




________________________________
From: radiodial868 <radiodial@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sat, May 25, 2013 6:33:35 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Airbrushing Resin Kits

While the spring loaded "expander" handle works fine for car bodies with
removable shells, what does one use to hold assembled Westerfield and Sunshine
models for spray-painting? Any tips?
Thx,
RJ Dial
Pleasanton, CA



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Craig Zeni
 

On May 25, 2013, at 10:52 PM, STMFC@... wrote:

2a. Airbrushing Resin Kits
Posted by: "radiodial868" radiodial@... radiodial868
Date: Sat May 25, 2013 4:27 pm ((PDT))

While the spring loaded "expander" handle works fine for car bodies with removable shells, what does one use to hold assembled Westerfield and Sunshine models for spray-painting? Any tips?
I usually build my resin box cars with the floor removable and secured to the body with blocks of 1/4" styrene and some 0-80 screws. None of us have ever had weights come loose in cars, have we? :)

The ones where I cannot do that, I use old shop truck sideframes on a lazy susan. I have a box of food preparation disposable gloves and wear one on my left hand and start by painting the underframe of the model as well as the 'downward facing' parts of the car body itself - the bottom of door ribs, end ribs, ladders, etc etc. That being finished, I put the model on my lazy susan and finish painting the thing. YMMV of course.

Craig Zeni
Cary NC


Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

<None of us have ever had weights come loose in cars, have we? :)>

I use BADA Tape-A-Weight #7026 self-sticking tire weights to add weight to
freight cars. They come 48 strips to a box, 12 quarter ounce lead weights
per strip, and they're similar to A-Line quarter ounce weights but with
better self-sticking tape and less expensive. I've never had one come loose.
Typical 40 ft. 6 in. resin boxcars take 1.5 oz. (strip of 6 weights) to
bring them close to the NMRA recommendation. That's 12 lb of weights, which
will take care of about 96 resin boxcars or reefers. They're too thick for
other car types. For stock cars, I use sixteenth inch sheet lead cut to
match the floor size, glued to the floor inside the car, and painted it so
it doesn't show.

Nelson Moyer


StephenK
 

I have had luck with a regular wire coathanger for box type cars. Hold the hook, and pull the center of the hanger (the part that would be cardboard if it was for pants) out until you have a long loop. Then bend the last 4-5 inches of the loop at a right angle. This part fits into the carbody. You can adjust the tension easily with this method.

Steve Kay

--- In STMFC@..., "Joe Bower" <jnbower1@...> wrote:

RJD.



I use a wire coat hanger, the type that has the horizontal paper tube.



Bend the Hook into a closed loop for the handle.



Pull the two wire ends out of the tube, and cut off about 5" of the wire.
File the ends to a smooth, rounded tip and slightly tapered so the tips can
slip into the Truck screw holes in the bolsters. Bend these arms to form a
"U" pointing up away from the handle, and equal to the span between the
bolsters on the car to be painted. (Make several "Holders", bent to fit the
spans of different length models)



If the legs of the "U" are separated by slightly more, or less than bolster
centers, the spring force should hold the models satisfactorily.



J. Bower.







_____

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
radiodial868
Sent: Saturday, May 25, 2013 7:27 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Airbrushing Resin Kits





While the spring loaded "expander" handle works fine for car bodies with
removable shells, what does one use to hold assembled Westerfield and
Sunshine models for spray-painting? Any tips?
Thx,
RJ Dial
Pleasanton, CA





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Kenneth Montero
 

Adding an inexpensive Rubbermaid 14" lazy susan underneath the paint stand will allow you to rotate the model to varying positions for spray painting.

Tamiya makes two lazy susan paint stands sold as a set:

http://www.tamiyausa.com/items/paints-finishes-60/tamiya-air-brushes-accessories-57000/spray-work-painting-stand-set-74522

The spring-loaded one has adjustable springs. Would this one would be useful for painting the one-piece bodies now being produced for some resin kits? I have used it with good results for plastic models because I can pick up the lazy susan with model attached to spray paint from the bottom upwards, and see no reason not to be able to use it with resin one-piece bodies (boxcars, gondolas, etc.)

The other one could be used to paint the underframe or the inside of a gondola (use a loop of low-tack "blue" masking tape to hold the underframe to this one).

Ken Montero

----- Original Message -----
From: "joe binish" <binish6@q.com>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, May 25, 2013 9:58:49 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Airbrushing Resin Kits






RJ,
see www.bobsworkbench.com for a holder I built following an article in RMC,
also Bob Sterner's approach to the same idea.
joe binish
----- Original Message -----
From: "radiodial868" < radiodial@... >
To: < STMFC@... >
Sent: Saturday, May 25, 2013 6:27 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Airbrushing Resin Kits

While the spring loaded "expander" handle works fine for car bodies with
removable shells, what does one use to hold assembled Westerfield and
Sunshine models for spray-painting? Any tips?
Thx,
RJ Dial
Pleasanton, CA



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Andy Sperandeo
 

Hello RJ,

I like to use empty toilet paper rolls to hold built-up resin carbodies for airbrushing. You have to squeeze them a little to fit into the resin carbody, and they spring back enough to hold the body in place but without putting much pressure on the superglue joints. For one-piece resin bodies, though, the spring-loaded handles will do.

So long,

Andy


Pierre <pierre.oliver@...>
 

RJ et all,
I've just blogged about I solve this problem for myself.
http://www.elgincarshops.com/mylayout.php
Enjoy,
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@..., "radiodial868" <radiodial@...> wrote:

While the spring loaded "expander" handle works fine for car bodies with removable shells, what does one use to hold assembled Westerfield and Sunshine models for spray-painting? Any tips?
Thx,
RJ Dial
Pleasanton, CA


Malcolm H. Houck
 

Gents,

I have used a very simple method for holding cars when airbrushing,
both resin cars and others as well. I take a length of plastic pipe hanger
material and bend one end sharply at the right angle. Using one of
the punched holes I screw the piece to the car bolster using the truck
mounting screw through the bolster kingpin hole.

Making a gentle arc I cut the pipe hanger to length while giving me
enough material to make a hand hold. Bending the loose end again at
a right angle I screw down the other end firmly. This makes a large
loop by which I can hold the car, rotate it to all angles and spray as I
go. The loop can then be hung on a hook for drying without ever touching
another surface.

When dry I remove the pipe hanger and save for the next job. I have
accumulated a number of these pipe hangers handles, of varying
lengths from different jobs painting cars of varying lengths as well.

I add this to my personal catalog of workshop tricks, along with using
cheap Dollar Store shot glasses for mixing paints or as parts holders
on the bench.

Mal Houck


Bob Sterner
 

Add this to the roster of homemade resin kit paint stands:

http://www.bobsworkbench.com/Bobs-Workbench/rolling-stock/brass-paint-stands

Bob Sterner
St. Paul, MN

--- In STMFC@..., Indian640@... wrote:

Gents,

I have used a very simple method for holding cars when airbrushing,
both resin cars and others as well. I take a length of plastic pipe hanger
material and bend one end sharply at the right angle. Using one of
the punched holes I screw the piece to the car bolster using the truck
mounting screw through the bolster kingpin hole.

Making a gentle arc I cut the pipe hanger to length while giving me
enough material to make a hand hold. Bending the loose end again at
a right angle I screw down the other end firmly. This makes a large
loop by which I can hold the car, rotate it to all angles and spray as I
go. The loop can then be hung on a hook for drying without ever touching
another surface.

When dry I remove the pipe hanger and save for the next job. I have
accumulated a number of these pipe hangers handles, of varying
lengths from different jobs painting cars of varying lengths as well.

I add this to my personal catalog of workshop tricks, along with using
cheap Dollar Store shot glasses for mixing paints or as parts holders
on the bench.

Mal Houck


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Steve SANDIFER
 

Very Nice.



________________________________________________________________

Steve Sandifer

12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477

713-376-0684

www.ssandifer.com



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Bob
Sterner
Sent: Tuesday, May 28, 2013 1:25 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Airbrushing Resin Kits





Add this to the roster of homemade resin kit paint stands:

http://www.bobsworkbench.com/Bobs-Workbench/rolling-stock/brass-paint-stands

Bob Sterner
St. Paul, MN

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> ,
Indian640@... wrote:

Gents,

I have used a very simple method for holding cars when airbrushing,
both resin cars and others as well. I take a length of plastic pipe hanger
material and bend one end sharply at the right angle. Using one of
the punched holes I screw the piece to the car bolster using the truck
mounting screw through the bolster kingpin hole.

Making a gentle arc I cut the pipe hanger to length while giving me
enough material to make a hand hold. Bending the loose end again at
a right angle I screw down the other end firmly. This makes a large
loop by which I can hold the car, rotate it to all angles and spray as I
go. The loop can then be hung on a hook for drying without ever touching
another surface.

When dry I remove the pipe hanger and save for the next job. I have
accumulated a number of these pipe hangers handles, of varying
lengths from different jobs painting cars of varying lengths as well.

I add this to my personal catalog of workshop tricks, along with using
cheap Dollar Store shot glasses for mixing paints or as parts holders
on the bench.

Mal Houck