Polishing Styrene and other model materials


hvyweight41
 

Good evening all. I have read many articles and posts about modifying kits and kit bashing. I am getting ready to embark on my first projects and I was wondering if anyone has some tips for polishing styrene or other materials (I.e., resin) after details are removed? Things like molded on hand grabs and ladders need to be removed. Scraping off details will result in a rougher surface than the original molded part. I will be painting or burnishing Bare Metal foil onto car bodies and such. I would like the finish to be consistent across the surface. Any hints or tips?

Thanks,
Keith Kempster
Jacksonville, FL


Frederick Freitas <prrinvt@...>
 

Keith, You will be doing a lot of sanding and filing. When you feel you have the right amount of detail removed, apply putty to the divots in the body casting; then sand them smooth. This is usually done with very fine sand paper to finish the work area. When you are satisfied with the results, try rubbing with 0000 steel wool to polish the plastic or resin. Wash all the parts before you reassemble it. Fred FreitasBennington, VT

--- On Thu, 5/30/13, hvyweight41 <hvyweight41@yahoo.com> wrote:

From: hvyweight41 <hvyweight41@yahoo.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Polishing Styrene and other model materials
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, May 30, 2013, 7:41 PM
















 









Good evening all. I have read many articles and posts about modifying kits and kit bashing. I am getting ready to embark on my first projects and I was wondering if anyone has some tips for polishing styrene or other materials (I.e., resin) after details are removed? Things like molded on hand grabs and ladders need to be removed. Scraping off details will result in a rougher surface than the original molded part. I will be painting or burnishing Bare Metal foil onto car bodies and such. I would like the finish to be consistent across the surface. Any hints or tips?



Thanks,

Keith Kempster

Jacksonville, FL



























[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Charles Happel
 

My favorite technique is to wet sand with either 400 or 600 waterproof aluminum oxide paper, as the water serves to lubricate and eliminate scratches.

Chuck Happel



"The most persistent threat to freedom, to the rights of Americans, is fear."

- George Meany (1894-1980)

--- On Thu, 5/30/13, hvyweight41 <hvyweight41@yahoo.com> wrote:

From: hvyweight41 <hvyweight41@yahoo.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Polishing Styrene and other model materials
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, May 30, 2013, 6:41 PM
















 









Good evening all. I have read many articles and posts about modifying kits and kit bashing. I am getting ready to embark on my first projects and I was wondering if anyone has some tips for polishing styrene or other materials (I.e., resin) after details are removed? Things like molded on hand grabs and ladders need to be removed. Scraping off details will result in a rougher surface than the original molded part. I will be painting or burnishing Bare Metal foil onto car bodies and such. I would like the finish to be consistent across the surface. Any hints or tips?



Thanks,

Keith Kempster

Jacksonville, FL



























[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Bill Welch
 

I like using 600 and then 1000. "Ace" has 1500 and I have found 1000 and 2000 at Auto finishing stores.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "hvyweight41" <hvyweight41@...> wrote:

Good evening all. I have read many articles and posts about modifying kits and kit bashing. I am getting ready to embark on my first projects and I was wondering if anyone has some tips for polishing styrene or other materials (I.e., resin) after details are removed? Things like molded on hand grabs and ladders need to be removed. Scraping off details will result in a rougher surface than the original molded part. I will be painting or burnishing Bare Metal foil onto car bodies and such. I would like the finish to be consistent across the surface. Any hints or tips?

Thanks,
Keith Kempster
Jacksonville, FL


Bruce Smith
 

Keith,

Bare metal foil on freight cars? Is this for patch panels? Basic sanding with decreasing grits is usually the way to handle any irregularities caused in the course of modeling. "polishing" is a term that seems a bit extreme for what you seem to be implying that you will do. If this isn't a helpful answer it might be useful to provide more details on what you are planning to do.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL
________________________________________
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [STMFC@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of hvyweight41 [hvyweight41@yahoo.com]
Sent: Thursday, May 30, 2013 6:41 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Polishing Styrene and other model materials

Good evening all. I have read many articles and posts about modifying kits and kit bashing. I am getting ready to embark on my first projects and I was wondering if anyone has some tips for polishing styrene or other materials (I.e., resin) after details are removed? Things like molded on hand grabs and ladders need to be removed. Scraping off details will result in a rougher surface than the original molded part. I will be painting or burnishing Bare Metal foil onto car bodies and such. I would like the finish to be consistent across the surface. Any hints or tips?

Thanks,
Keith Kempster
Jacksonville, FL



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Greg Martin
 

Keith,

I think you'll need a good supply of Wet and Dry sandpaper, don't stop at
your local hobby shop unless they carry sizes down to 1200 grit which is
generally found in single sheet or packages at Auto Parts Dealers. I keep a
supply handy even though I don't use it that often I have been known to.
Smooth flat surfaces demand it. Use water or oil to aid in the sanding, but
oil cuts harder than water, choose your poison. Work in a circular motion
as broadly as you can with light pressure.

Greg Martin

Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean

In a message dated 5/30/2013 4:41:08 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
hvyweight41@yahoo.com writes:




Good evening all. I have read many articles and posts about modifying kits
and kit bashing. I am getting ready to embark on my first projects and I
was wondering if anyone has some tips for polishing styrene or other
materials (I.e., resin) after details are removed? Things like molded on hand grabs
and ladders need to be removed. Scraping off details will result in a
rougher surface than the original molded part. I will be painting or burnishing
Bare Metal foil onto car bodies and such. I would like the finish to be
consistent across the surface. Any hints or tips?

Thanks,
Keith Kempster
Jacksonville, FL


Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

A local home improvement center carries 1000 and 1500 sandpaper in addition
to 400 and 600. I use the finer grades for polishing. I've found I can
polish clear acrylic lenses by rubbing the face of the lens on a dry piece
of printer paper after sanding with 1500 sandpaper.



Nelson Moyer

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Charles Happel
Sent: Thursday, May 30, 2013 7:26 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Polishing Styrene and other model materials





My favorite technique is to wet sand with either 400 or 600 waterproof
aluminum oxide paper, as the water serves to lubricate and eliminate
scratches.

Chuck Happel

"The most persistent threat to freedom, to the rights of Americans, is
fear."

- George Meany (1894-1980)

--- On Thu, 5/30/13, hvyweight41 <hvyweight41@yahoo.com
<mailto:hvyweight41%40yahoo.com> > wrote:

From: hvyweight41 <hvyweight41@yahoo.com <mailto:hvyweight41%40yahoo.com> >
Subject: [STMFC] Polishing Styrene and other model materials
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thursday, May 30, 2013, 6:41 PM



Good evening all. I have read many articles and posts about modifying kits
and kit bashing. I am getting ready to embark on my first projects and I was
wondering if anyone has some tips for polishing styrene or other materials
(I.e., resin) after details are removed? Things like molded on hand grabs
and ladders need to be removed. Scraping off details will result in a
rougher surface than the original molded part. I will be painting or
burnishing Bare Metal foil onto car bodies and such. I would like the finish
to be consistent across the surface. Any hints or tips?

Thanks,

Keith Kempster

Jacksonville, FL


Michael Watnoski
 

Hi Keith,

I second Chuck's technique and would add that my favorite filling material is slow setting epoxy. I mix up the epoxy and spread a minimal amount on the area or divot. I leave the excess that was mixed on a surface that I can check occasionally. When it is a thick paste, I remove any excess from the model with a sharp #17 blade or a single edged razor. This leaves very little to be sanded when set completely.

HTH

Michael

On 5/30/2013 8:26 PM, Charles Happel wrote:
My favorite technique is to wet sand with either 400 or 600 waterproof aluminum oxide paper, as the water serves to lubricate and eliminate scratches.

Chuck Happel


michaelegross <michaelEGross@...>
 

Gentlemen:

In addition to the excellent wet sandpaper methods mentioned in earlier postings, I have also used toothpaste as a final polisher for plastic surfaces, as the paste contains microscopic grit. I apply it in a circular motion with the top of a flat pencil eraser, and the residue easily washes off with water. For a slightly larger grit, use baking soda and water.

Cheers!

Michael Gross
La Cañada, CA






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,

The sanding thread has been interesting.

I noticed years back that the finest belt that can be bought off-the-shelf for the NWSL sanding stick is 600 grit, which is too coarse for some types of work.

So, inspird by this thread, I made my own sanding belt from 1200 grit paper.I simply cut the sandpaper using a discarded X-Acto #11 blade to 1/4 inch width. Since one length of the sandpaper would not be long enough to make the entire loop, I used two segments. Made the glue joint with Walthers Goo, following the guideline that you apply the cement to both sides to be joined, let it set for about 30 minutes, then press. After that I waited overnight for max strength to set in, and it works beautifuly.

- Claus Sclund

-----Original Message-----
From: michaelegross [mailto:michaelEGross@aol.com]
Sent: Friday, May 31, 2013 09:48 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Polishing Styrene and other model materials

Gentlemen:

In addition to the excellent wet sandpaper methods mentioned in earlier postings, I have also used toothpaste as a final polisher for plastic surfaces, as the paste contains microscopic grit. I apply it in a circular motion with the top of a flat pencil eraser, and the residue easily washes off with water. For a slightly larger grit, use baking soda and water.

Cheers!

Michael Gross
La Cañada, CA






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




albyrno
 

I have some sanding films 800 - 8000 grit I got from a hobby shop,they came in a 10-pack of various grits.The link below offers several sanding film assortments reasonably priced,the 320 - 12,000 grit assortment should be all you need if you want you can get the 20,000 - 60,000 grit.. You would need a high power magnifying glass to see any scratches but it will take forever to remove material.
  Alan

http://www.flex-i-file.com/alpha/sanding-film-products.php


hvyweight41
 

First, I'd like to apologize for not being able to reply sooner to all of the great responses. Life has a way of getting in the way of our fun. Second, I'd like to thank everyone for their feedback on the subject. It looks to me like I need to get some materials, fillers and sanding materials, and practice filling, filing and polishing before I start on an expensive model.
Thanks,
Keith Kempster
Jacksonville, FL

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "hvyweight41" <hvyweight41@...> wrote:

Good evening all. I have read many articles and posts about modifying kits and kit bashing. I am getting ready to embark on my first projects and I was wondering if anyone has some tips for polishing styrene or other materials (I.e., resin) after details are removed? Things like molded on hand grabs and ladders need to be removed. Scraping off details will result in a rougher surface than the original molded part. I will be painting or burnishing Bare Metal foil onto car bodies and such. I would like the finish to be consistent across the surface. Any hints or tips?

Thanks,
Keith Kempster
Jacksonville, FL