waybill preparation


Tony Thompson
 

I've just added a new post to my blog, about waybill preparation. It's the recollections of someone who DID this job, and it clarifies the process in a way no other source could do. If you're interested, it's at this link:

http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2013/06/waybills-29-waybill-preparation.html

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Charlie Duckworth
 

Tony
You did a great job on capturing the details on handling the waybill process from the signing of the BoLing to distribution of the multipart waybill. I worked in the Mopac's stations starting in 1975 and was around the waybill process until I retired from UP in 2012. On my own Bagnell Branch local I've added an LCL waybill for the crew to load live chicks at one of the depots and since its summer I have a load of company material ice in an old ART reefer for the section gangs to get during operating sessions. I came across the ice operations from a letter from the MP superintendent to the agents cutting off the ice car in the late 1950's and advising the agent to purchase the ice from local sources.

Am in the process of making up another switching scenario where the Mopac pulls a car off the RI interchange that's a 'Shipper's Order Notify' bill of lading. The car wouldn't be spotted at industry until the consignee showed the agent he'd gone to the local bank and paid for the commodity. The consignee's proof was a stamped bill of lading from the bank. The agent would then instruct the crew to spot the car on their next run. All I will do from a model railroad operation is have the crew spot the car by the depot instead of the industry. Shipper's Order bills of lading were pretty common in the grain industry. Obviously the railroads weren't pleased with the process because if the crew spotted the car directly to the consignee without the shipper receiving payment the railroad was liable.

Charlie Duckworth

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:

I've just added a new post to my blog, about waybill preparation. It's the recollections of someone who DID this job, and it clarifies the process in a way no other source could do. If you're interested, it's at this link:

http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2013/06/waybills-29-waybill-preparation.html

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


John King
 

Charlie, Tony,

The B&O agent at Charles Town WV would have the local crew spot the Order Notify cars (STMFCs, of course) at the industry and would put padlocks on them until he had the released bill of lading.

John King

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Charlie D" <omahaduck@...> wrote:

Tony
You did a great job on capturing the details on handling the waybill process from the signing of the BoLing to distribution of the multipart waybill. I worked in the Mopac's stations starting in 1975 and was around the waybill process until I retired from UP in 2012. On my own Bagnell Branch local I've added an LCL waybill for the crew to load live chicks at one of the depots and since its summer I have a load of company material ice in an old ART reefer for the section gangs to get during operating sessions. I came across the ice operations from a letter from the MP superintendent to the agents cutting off the ice car in the late 1950's and advising the agent to purchase the ice from local sources.

Am in the process of making up another switching scenario where the Mopac pulls a car off the RI interchange that's a 'Shipper's Order Notify' bill of lading. The car wouldn't be spotted at industry until the consignee showed the agent he'd gone to the local bank and paid for the commodity. The consignee's proof was a stamped bill of lading from the bank. The agent would then instruct the crew to spot the car on their next run. All I will do from a model railroad operation is have the crew spot the car by the depot instead of the industry. Shipper's Order bills of lading were pretty common in the grain industry. Obviously the railroads weren't pleased with the process because if the crew spotted the car directly to the consignee without the shipper receiving payment the railroad was liable.

Charlie Duckworth


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tony Thompson <tony@> wrote:

I've just added a new post to my blog, about waybill preparation. It's the recollections of someone who DID this job, and it clarifies the process in a way no other source could do. If you're interested, it's at this link:

http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2013/06/waybills-29-waybill-preparation.html

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@
Publishers of books on railroad history


Tony Thompson
 

Charlie Duckworth wrote:
Tony
You did a great job on capturing the details on handling the waybill process from the signing of the BoLing to distribution of the multipart waybill. I worked in the Mopac's stations starting in 1975 and was around the waybill process until I retired from UP in 2012. On my own Bagnell Branch local I've added an LCL waybill for the crew to load live chicks at one of the depots and since its summer I have a load of company material ice in an old ART reefer for the section gangs to get during operating sessions. I came across the ice operations from a letter from the MP superintendent to the agents cutting off the ice car in the late 1950's and advising the agent to purchase the ice from local sources.
Thanks, Charlie, but of course the excellent summary is from Harry Dolan, not me. I have not yet used LCL waybills, but do have some "Stop This Car" waybills, which as I understand it were used for partial load deliveries, all from one shipper, so not LCL in the normal sense. Any clarification would be welcome.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Charlie Duckworth
 

I've contacted a friend of mine who was a Mopac agent in the 1950's as to LCL billing. I think the cars were billed on a movement waybill agent to agent and then individual freight bills were issued for the individual LCL shipments. As to 'stopover cars' you are right the car would be billed to the ultimate destination but the waybill had a section for 'stop this cat at' for part unloads. After the car reached the intermediate point the agent would issue a corrected waybill with the next stop over or ultimate destination and consignee.

There's a great reference book titled 'the Station Agent's Blue Book ' that covers the waybilling, accounting, tickets, etc for the STMFC era. It was published by ' the Order of Railroad Telegraphers'. Mine copy is dated 1958. Makes great reading if you have any trouble sleeping at night.....

Will pass along the LCL information when I get it.

Charlie Duckworth

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:

Charlie Duckworth wrote:
Tony
You did a great job on capturing the details on handling the waybill process from the signing of the BoLing to distribution of the multipart waybill. I worked in the Mopac's stations starting in 1975 and was around the waybill process until I retired from UP in 2012. On my own Bagnell Branch local I've added an LCL waybill for the crew to load live chicks at one of the depots and since its summer I have a load of company material ice in an old ART reefer for the section gangs to get during operating sessions. I came across the ice operations from a letter from the MP superintendent to the agents cutting off the ice car in the late 1950's and advising the agent to purchase the ice from local sources.
Thanks, Charlie, but of course the excellent summary is from Harry Dolan, not me. I have not yet used LCL waybills, but do have some "Stop This Car" waybills, which as I understand it were used for partial load deliveries, all from one shipper, so not LCL in the normal sense. Any clarification would be welcome.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Tony Thompson
 

Charlie Duckworth wrote:
I've contacted a friend of mine who was a Mopac agent in the 1950's as to LCL billing. I think the cars were billed on a movement waybill agent to agent and then individual freight bills were issued for the individual LCL shipments. As to 'stopover cars' you are right the car would be billed to the ultimate destination but the waybill had a section for 'stop this cat at' for part unloads. After the car reached the intermediate point the agent would issue a corrected waybill with the next stop over or ultimate destination and consignee.

There's a great reference book titled 'the Station Agent's Blue Book ' that covers the waybilling, accounting, tickets, etc for the STMFC era. It was published by ' the Order of Railroad Telegraphers'. Mine copy is dated 1958. Makes great reading if you have any trouble sleeping at night.....
Yes, certainly at least some LCL was billed as you describe: a cover bill, agent to agent, and then all the waybills for the individual shipments stapled behind it. I am amazed to hear that the "Station Agent's Blue Book" was updated as late as 1958. I picked up a copy dated 1928 some time back, and guessed it was an artifact of that earlier era. It would be interesting to compare the two.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Charlie Duckworth
 

Tony
Talked to my friend who was an agent for a while, then he moved over to train service. By the late 1950's he said there was only one LCL car on his territory coming off a branchline. The mainline LCL had been moved to LTL. There was no waybill for the railcar but the individual pallets, boxes, etc all had separate bills and the train crew would spot the car at the depot or freight house based on the bills traveling with the car (train crew would help the agent unload or load the car as well). He also commented the LCL cars were assigned to a territory (which would help the station forces know which cars were 'real nobills' needing research and those assigned to LCL service)

Hope this helps...

Charlie Duckworth

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:

Charlie Duckworth wrote:
Tony
You did a great job on capturing the details on handling the waybill process from the signing of the BoLing to distribution of the multipart waybill. I worked in the Mopac's stations starting in 1975 and was around the waybill process until I retired from UP in 2012. On my own Bagnell Branch local I've added an LCL waybill for the crew to load live chicks at one of the depots and since its summer I have a load of company material ice in an old ART reefer for the section gangs to get during operating sessions. I came across the ice operations from a letter from the MP superintendent to the agents cutting off the ice car in the late 1950's and advising the agent to purchase the ice from local sources.
Thanks, Charlie, but of course the excellent summary is from Harry Dolan, not me. I have not yet used LCL waybills, but do have some "Stop This Car" waybills, which as I understand it were used for partial load deliveries, all from one shipper, so not LCL in the normal sense. Any clarification would be welcome.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Chet
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:

Charlie Duckworth wrote:
I've contacted a friend of mine who was a Mopac agent in the 1950's as to LCL billing. I think the cars were billed on a movement waybill agent to agent and then individual freight bills were issued for the individual LCL shipments. As to 'stopover cars' you are right the car would be billed to the ultimate destination but the waybill had a section for 'stop this cat at' for part unloads. After the car reached the intermediate point the agent would issue a corrected waybill with the next stop over or ultimate destination and consignee.

There's a great reference book titled 'the Station Agent's Blue Book ' that covers the waybilling, accounting, tickets, etc for the STMFC era. It was published by ' the Order of Railroad Telegraphers'. Mine copy is dated 1958. Makes great reading if you have any trouble sleeping at night.....
Yes, certainly at least some LCL was billed as you describe: a cover bill, agent to agent, and then all the waybills for the individual shipments stapled behind it. I am amazed to hear that the "Station Agent's Blue Book" was updated as late as 1958. I picked up a copy dated 1928 some time back, and guessed it was an artifact of that earlier era. It would be interesting to compare the two.



I have waybills for one car of LCL which originated at Forrest, IL.
There was a total of 110 waybills for the load in WAB 84807. The contents of the car was 568 bags of certified and uncertified Nemaha
oat seed, with each bag weighing 97 lbs.

Three different shippers were listed on the waybills. Only one shipper on each w/b. They includeded Imperial Seed Co., Central Iowa
Seed Farms, and Cornbelt Seed Assn., all from Clear Lake, IA.

The car was routed to Chicago via the Wabash and the bags were transferred to six railroads for destinations in Iowa, Minnesota, and
South Dakota. They included;

RI 27 consigneees 200 bags $204.48 frt charges
MILW 35 " 174 " $208.23 " "
CNW 30 " 115 " $147.93 " "
CBQ 5 " 32 " $30.03 " "
CGW 6 " 27 " $31.09 " "
SOO 7 " 20 " $25.05 " "

The load went to 110 consignees with $646.81 in freight charges for the 568 bags. There were 10 shipments of one bag only and the most bags in one shipment was 27. The minimum charge for one bag shipments
was $2.30. The consignees all appears to be individual farmers or
feed salesmen. I imagine the clerk was whimpering after typing the
110 waybills.

Chet French
Dixon, IL


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jun 24, 2013, at 1:03 PM, "Chet" <cfrench39@comcast.net> wrote:

I have waybills for one car of LCL which originated at Forrest, IL.
There was a total of 110 waybills for the load in WAB 84807. The contents of the car was 568 bags of certified and uncertified Nemaha
oat seed, with each bag weighing 97 lbs.

Three different shippers were listed on the waybills. Only one shipper on each w/b. They includeded Imperial Seed Co., Central Iowa
Seed Farms, and Cornbelt Seed Assn., all from Clear Lake, IA.

The car was routed to Chicago via the Wabash and the bags were transferred to six railroads for destinations in Iowa, Minnesota, and
South Dakota. They included;

RI 27 consigneees 200 bags $204.48 frt charges
MILW 35 " 174 " $208.23 " "
CNW 30 " 115 " $147.93 " "
CBQ 5 " 32 " $30.03 " "
CGW 6 " 27 " $31.09 " "
SOO 7 " 20 " $25.05 " "

The load went to 110 consignees with $646.81 in freight charges for the 568 bags. There were 10 shipments of one bag only and the most bags in one shipment was 27. The minimum charge for one bag shipments
was $2.30. The consignees all appears to be individual farmers or
feed salesmen. I imagine the clerk was whimpering after typing the
110 waybills.
Good grief, Chet. No wonder the railroads wanted to get out of the LCL business!

Richard Hendrickson


Charlie Duckworth
 

I found a LCL waybill study the Mopac did in April 1960, another reason for the departure from LCL to LTL as the large number of railcars handling under 5000 pounds per trip. Out of the 200 cars on the Kansas study 145 cars were 5,000 and under and 34 car were moving 500 pounds and under of LCL.

What's amazing is the large number of foreign line boxcars being used in LCL service on local MP moves.

Charlie Duckworth

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...> wrote:

On Jun 24, 2013, at 1:03 PM, "Chet" <cfrench39@...> wrote:

I have waybills for one car of LCL which originated at Forrest, IL.
There was a total of 110 waybills for the load in WAB 84807. The contents of the car was 568 bags of certified and uncertified Nemaha
oat seed, with each bag weighing 97 lbs.

Three different shippers were listed on the waybills. Only one shipper on each w/b. They includeded Imperial Seed Co., Central Iowa
Seed Farms, and Cornbelt Seed Assn., all from Clear Lake, IA.

The car was routed to Chicago via the Wabash and the bags were transferred to six railroads for destinations in Iowa, Minnesota, and
South Dakota. They included;

RI 27 consigneees 200 bags $204.48 frt charges
MILW 35 " 174 " $208.23 " "
CNW 30 " 115 " $147.93 " "
CBQ 5 " 32 " $30.03 " "
CGW 6 " 27 " $31.09 " "
SOO 7 " 20 " $25.05 " "

The load went to 110 consignees with $646.81 in freight charges for the 568 bags. There were 10 shipments of one bag only and the most bags in one shipment was 27. The minimum charge for one bag shipments
was $2.30. The consignees all appears to be individual farmers or
feed salesmen. I imagine the clerk was whimpering after typing the
110 waybills.
Good grief, Chet. No wonder the railroads wanted to get out of the LCL business!

Richard Hendrickson



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]