Looking for a Short Line


John Miller <amwing1588@...>
 

Hi all,

I don't know if this is the correct venue to ask this, but I will anyway. I need help in discovering a short line RR set in the early to mid 1930's (depression era). I would like to be able to research it through visits, photo's and books and then build a layout and fill it with the correct types of rolling stock appropriate for that time period.
The short line I'm interested in modeling would have had it's own road name (or even one of a major line)along with it's own rolling stock, but would also move a lot of interchange cars along it's line and might include rolling stock...from milk cars, log cars, covered hoppers to 50' auto boxes and Oh ya...lots of small to medium steamers. I've been modeling the larger mainline roads for years, but just find myself yearning for something special. There are so many of these branch lines/short lines across the country, and that being said, I'd like to hear from you all, which ones you like and why. At this point, I don't have a geographical preference, so let the suggestions fly.

Thanks to all in advance.

John Miller
Folsom, CA.


Tony Thompson
 

John Miller wrote:
I don't know if this is the correct venue to ask this, but I will anyway. I need help in discovering a short line RR set in the early to mid 1930's (depression era). I would like to be able to research it through visits, photo's and books and then build a layout and fill it with the correct types of rolling stock appropriate for that time period.
The short line I'm interested in modeling would have had it's own road name (or even one of a major line)along with it's own rolling stock, but would also move a lot of interchange cars along it's line and might include rolling stock...from milk cars, log cars, covered hoppers to 50' auto boxes and Oh ya...lots of small to medium steamers. I've been modeling the larger mainline roads for years, but just find myself yearning for something special. There are so many of these branch lines/short lines across the country, and that being said, I'd like to hear from you all, which ones you like and why. At this point, I don't have a geographical preference, so let the suggestions fly.
One obvious possibility is the Yosemite Valley. Sure meets some of your criteria. Of course in the 1930s covered hoppers were VERY rare, on the YV or anywhere.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Benjamin Hom
 

John Miller asked:
"I don't know if this is the correct venue to ask this, but I will anyway. I need help in discovering
a  short line RR set in the early to mid 1930's (depression era). I would like to be able to research
it through visits, photo's and books and then build a layout and fill it with the correct types of
rolling stock appropriate for that time period.

The short line I'm interested in modeling would have had it's own road name (or even one of a major
line) along with it's own rolling stock, but would also move a lot of interchange cars along it's line
and might include rolling stock...from milk cars, log cars, covered hoppers to 50' auto boxes and Oh
ya...lots of small to medium steamers. I've been modeling the larger mainline roads for years, but
just find myself yearning for something special. There are so many of these branch lines/short lines
across the country, and that being said, I'd like to hear from you all, which ones you like and why.
At this point, I don't have a geographical preference, so let the suggestions fly."
 
Sounds a bit much for a short line.  However, if you'd consider a small Class I, you just described the Rutland (except for the log cars).  Here's a website to get you started:
http://users.rcn.com/jimdu4/
 
 
Ben Hom 

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


albyrno
 

The california western might work for you they started out as logging operation and have since had freight and passenger service,they have interchanges with other rr's.Most known for skunk trains.
Alan

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "John Miller" <amwing1588@...> wrote:

Hi all,

I don't know if this is the correct venue to ask this, but I will anyway. I need help in discovering a short line RR set in the early to mid 1930's (depression era). I would like to be able to research it through visits, photo's and books and then build a layout and fill it with the correct types of rolling stock appropriate for that time period.
The short line I'm interested in modeling would have had it's own road name (or even one of a major line)along with it's own rolling stock, but would also move a lot of interchange cars along it's line and might include rolling stock...from milk cars, log cars, covered hoppers to 50' auto boxes and Oh ya...lots of small to medium steamers. I've been modeling the larger mainline roads for years, but just find myself yearning for something special. There are so many of these branch lines/short lines across the country, and that being said, I'd like to hear from you all, which ones you like and why. At this point, I don't have a geographical preference, so let the suggestions fly.

Thanks to all in advance.

John Miller
Folsom, CA.


Schuyler Larrabee
 

Not short lines . . .



But branches. The Lackawanna had two branches that offer a lot of what you're seeking,
first the Bangor & Portland branch (which is NOT in Maine, but in northeastern
Pennsylvania. My friend, Paul Cappelloni, not a member of this list, has a very nice
rendition of this line in his basement outside Philadelphia.

http://pcapp1.tripod.com/bangor_and_portland_rail_way.htm It has a lot of operational
possibilities and Paul has had some operation sessions though he's not quite there yet.
Also see:

http://www.trainlife.com/magazines/pages/37/2684/january-2006-page-36



The other branch is "The Bloom," the Bloomsburg branch south out of Scranton to Bloomsburg
PA. Much the same in terms of operational interest, a simple straight line railroad.
Google Lackawanna Bloomsburg Branch or Bloomsburg Division and you will get some hits.



The DL&W had two other branches, from Binghamton to Syracuse and also from Binghamton to
Utica, but IMHO neither of these have the interest of either the B&P or the Bloom.



Schuyler







From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of John Miller
Sent: Monday, August 05, 2013 10:00 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Looking for a Short Line





Hi all,

I don't know if this is the correct venue to ask this, but I will anyway. I need help in
discovering a short line RR set in the early to mid 1930's (depression era). I would like
to be able to research it through visits, photo's and books and then build a layout and
fill it with the correct types of rolling stock appropriate for that time period.
The short line I'm interested in modeling would have had it's own road name (or even one
of a major line)along with it's own rolling stock, but would also move a lot of
interchange cars along it's line and might include rolling stock...from milk cars, log
cars, covered hoppers to 50' auto boxes and Oh ya...lots of small to medium steamers. I've
been modeling the larger mainline roads for years, but just find myself yearning for
something special. There are so many of these branch lines/short lines across the country,
and that being said, I'd like to hear from you all, which ones you like and why. At this
point, I don't have a geographical preference, so let the suggestions fly.

Thanks to all in advance.

John Miller
Folsom, CA.


Scott H. Haycock
 

The Original Norfolk Southern, a Class 1 (just barely) bridge line that ran between Norfolk, VA and Charlotte, NC would fit your description. This road has a Historical Society and a Yahoo list.


Scott Haycock
Modeling Tarheel country in the Land of Enchantm ent

----- Original Message -----





Hi all,

I don't know if this is the correct venue to ask this, but I will anyway. I need help in discovering a short line RR set in the early to mid 1930's (depression era). I would like to be able to research it through visits, photo's and books and then build a layout and fill it with the correct types of rolling stock appropriate for that time period.
The short line I'm interested in modeling would have had it's own road name (or even one of a major line)along with it's own rolling stock, but would also move a lot of interchange cars along it's line and might include rolling stock...from milk cars, log cars, covered hoppers to 50' auto boxes and Oh ya...lots of small to medium steamers. I've been modeling the larger mainline roads for years, but just find myself yearning for something special. There are so many of these branch lines/short lines across the country, and that being said, I'd like to hear from you all, which ones you like and why. At this point, I don't have a geographical preference, so let the suggestions fly.

Thanks to all in advance.

John Miller
Folsom, CA.




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


John C. La Rue, Jr. <MOFWCABOOSE@...>
 

Common carrier railroads that hauled logs would be mostly in the South (Tremont & Gulf) or the West (Oregon, Pacific & Eastern, Oregon, California & Eastern), and were mostly at least partly owned by the lumber companies whose logs they hauled.

If you can do without the logs, the railroad that springs to mind is the Maryland & Pennsylvania. Extensive information is available, and many of its locomotives and cars were done in brass. It has been modeled many times, either under its own name or as "look-alikes" with free-lance names, but very obviously copied from the "Ma & Pa".

George Hilton, who wrote a book about it, called it "A model railroad built to the scale of 12 inches equals one foot".

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL

-----Original Message-----
From: John Miller <amwing1588@sbcglobal.net>
To: STMFC <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Mon, Aug 5, 2013 9:59 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Looking for a Short Line






Hi all,

I don't know if this is the correct venue to ask this, but I will anyway. I need help in discovering a short line RR set in the early to mid 1930's (depression era). I would like to be able to research it through visits, photo's and books and then build a layout and fill it with the correct types of rolling stock appropriate for that time period.
The short line I'm interested in modeling would have had it's own road name (or even one of a major line)along with it's own rolling stock, but would also move a lot of interchange cars along it's line and might include rolling stock...from milk cars, log cars, covered hoppers to 50' auto boxes and Oh ya...lots of small to medium steamers. I've been modeling the larger mainline roads for years, but just find myself yearning for something special. There are so many of these branch lines/short lines across the country, and that being said, I'd like to hear from you all, which ones you like and why. At this point, I don't have a geographical preference, so let the suggestions fly.

Thanks to all in advance.

John Miller
Folsom, CA.








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Jack Burgess
 

<One obvious possibility is the Yosemite Valley. Sure meets some of your
<criteria. Of course in the 1930s covered hoppers were VERY rare, on the
<YV or anywhere.
<
<Tony

I couldn't have said it better Tony!

But, John, you also said "I would like to be able to research it through
visits, photo's and books [snip]". Back in the 1970s, there was a lot of
interest in modeling 2' gauge prototypes which was driven partly by Bob
Brown, editor of the Narrow Gauge and Short Line Gazette who was building a
large diorama based on one of those prototypes. A very good modeler/friend
who lived a few blocks from me was also modeling in On2. Their modeling was
so inspirational that I started seriously thinking about switching from HO
to On2. But, I realized that, while I knew a lot about my home state
(California), I didn't know anything about Maine, home to these 2' gauge
railroads. I didn't know what the trees looked like nor even what color the
dirt was. I assumed that I could never afford to visit Maine and, after
starting work on an On2 flat car, I decided that I needed to model a
California prototype. I ended up choosing the Yosemite Valley Railroad as a
prototype to model. (And, although the price is now around $350 per copy,
there is a very good book available on the YV!)

Forty years later, I could now afford to travel to Maine if I was modeling
it but modeling a prototype close by has a lot of advantages. A few weeks
ago, I was thinking about documents which indicated that the YV used either
redwood or cedar ties. Forty years ago, I assumed that the YV used creosoted
ties. But I'm now building a 1/4" scale diorama and this gives me the chance
to revisit my earlier conclusions. So, a few weeks ago, I did a quick trip
down to the YV (a 2-hour drive) which gave me the opportunity to determine
if my documentation regarding the use of redwood or cedar ties was correct.
I knew of a couple of places where YV ties are being used as fence posts
and a small splice with a sharp knife confirmed that the YV did indeed use
redwood ties. Okay, one may not care if their chosen prototype used redwood
or untreated pine ties but beware...once you are sucked into modeling a
specific prototype, this type of information might well become more
important!

You also mentioned:
"The short line I'm interested in modeling would have had its own road name
(or even one of a major line) along with its own rolling stock, but would
also move a lot of interchange cars along its line and might include rolling
stock...from milk cars, log cars, covered hoppers to 50' auto boxes and Oh
ya...lots of small to medium steamers. I've been modeling the larger
mainline roads for years, but just find myself yearning for something
special."

Okay...the Yosemite Valley Railroad hauled log cars and 22' ex-GN hopper
cars along with box cars and refrigerators cars but no milk cars. But it
also ran Pullmans during the summer months. The YV interchanged with both
the SP and ATSF but had its "own road name". As for "steamers", they ran
4-4-0s (Bachmann's Spectrum line has a very close stand-in) and 2-6-0s
(Bachmann now has an Alco 2-6-0 which might be close) and Beaver Creek
imported all 5 of the 2-6-0 engines. Rio Grande Models has a kit for the YV
log cars and the three stock cars. Both West Side and Beaver Creek imported
a model of one of the cabooses. BC also imported models of the hopper cars
(also available from Westerfield) and three of the passenger cars.

There is an impression in the hobby that "short lines" and "narrow gauge
lines" were rundown, poorly maintained railroads. And many modelers like to
model that look. However, I believe that that impression comes from photos
taken by railfans in the last years of the existence of those
prototypes...when word came out that they may be abandoned, railfans flocked
to them to record their last days. But photos of the YV, even in the early
1940s (it was abandoned in 1945) show engines that had been wiped down with
kerosene and diesel fuel daily (a late friend who worked for the YV in 1942
started out as a wiper). You can't run Pullmans, occasionally with three
sections for 15 cars each, with engines which weren't maintained.

What more could you want?

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Tony Thompson
 

John C. La Rue, Jr. wrote:
Common carrier railroads that hauled logs would be mostly in the South (Tremont & Gulf) or the West (Oregon, Pacific & Eastern, Oregon, California & Eastern), and were mostly at least partly owned by the lumber companies whose logs they hauled.

I don't know the T&G, but the OP&E hauled very little BESIDES logs. Thus it would hardly meet ANY of John Miller's criteria.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


rckwallaby
 

Is the Sierra Railroad too big for you ?
Fits a lot of your description.

Phil Morrow


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "John Miller" <amwing1588@...> wrote:

Hi all,
... I need help in discovering a short line RR set in the early to mid 1930's (depression era). I would like to be able to research it through visits, photo's and books and then build a layout and fill it with the correct types of rolling stock appropriate for that time period.
....

John Miller
Folsom, CA.


Bob Weston
 

Hi John,
Check out the AC&Y, Akron, Canton and Yongstown Railroad, although a small class one it meets most of your criteria. The exception being log cars. There was a historical society and a website.
Bob Weston

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "John Miller" <amwing1588@...> wrote:

Hi all,

I don't know if this is the correct venue to ask this, but I will anyway. I need help in discovering a short line RR set in the early to mid 1930's (depression era). I would like to be able to research it through visits, photo's and books and then build a layout and fill it with the correct types of rolling stock appropriate for that time period.
The short line I'm interested in modeling would have had it's own road name (or even one of a major line)along with it's own rolling stock, but would also move a lot of interchange cars along it's line and might include rolling stock...from milk cars, log cars, covered hoppers to 50' auto boxes and Oh ya...lots of small to medium steamers. I've been modeling the larger mainline roads for years, but just find myself yearning for something special. There are so many of these branch lines/short lines across the country, and that being said, I'd like to hear from you all, which ones you like and why. At this point, I don't have a geographical preference, so let the suggestions fly.

Thanks to all in advance.

John Miller
Folsom, CA.


Philip Taylor
 

The other short line is the Ma & Pa which ran from Baltimore to York, PA.
It was once called a prototype model railroad. Some of the engines have
been issued by Bachmann with sound and DCC. It ran a full spectrum of
freight and some Gas Electrics. It was narrow gauge in the 1800s, std
gauge steam in the 1900s and ran into the diesel era.

There is a historical society, yahoo group and a blog or two on the line.

Philip Taylor


asychis@...
 

If you like coal roads, give a look to the Interstate Railroad, lots of
great books that almost detail the road tie by tie, and someone (Atlas?) is
coming out with an RS3 in Interstate colors. They also bought used steam
locomotives that could be modified. Interchanges with the Southern, L&N and
Clinchfield.

Jerry Michels


asychis@...
 

Schuyler has a good point. There are numerous branchlines that can be
very interesting. I am doing this with the Missouri Pacific in the Southern
Illinois coal fields, another that I am familiar with is the Union Pacific's
branch out of Laramie to Walden. Depending on how "busy" you want the
railroad to be would affect your choice. Many branches had only one or two
trains a week, but coal branches could be very busy.

Jerry Michels


Phillip Blancher <pblancher@...>
 

I will second Ben's suggestion about the Rutland. While there was not
logs, there was cordwood, paper, and of course lots of granite loads.
The line had a fair amount of bridge traffic from Norwood, New York to
Rouses Point, or Alburgh, or all the way to Bellows Falls. If you'd
like more information on the Rutland, the Rutland Railroad Historical
Society has a website, http://www.rutlandrr.org. Membership dues start
at $15/year and you get a high-quality quarterly magazine.

Phillip
--
Phillip Blancher - Membership Chair
Rutland Railroad Historical Society
http://www.rutlandrr.org

On Mon, Aug 5, 2013 at 9:59 PM, John Miller <amwing1588@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
Hi all,

I don't know if this is the correct venue to ask this, but I will anyway. I need help in discovering a short line RR set in the early to mid 1930's (depression era). I would like to be able to research it through visits, photo's and books and then build a layout and fill it with the correct types of rolling stock appropriate for that time period.
The short line I'm interested in modeling would have had it's own road name (or even one of a major line)along with it's own rolling stock, but would also move a lot of interchange cars along it's line and might include rolling stock...from milk cars, log cars, covered hoppers to 50' auto boxes and Oh ya...lots of small to medium steamers. I've been modeling the larger mainline roads for years, but just find myself yearning for something special. There are so many of these branch lines/short lines across the country, and that being said, I'd like to hear from you all, which ones you like and why. At this point, I don't have a geographical preference, so let the suggestions fly.

Thanks to all in advance.

John Miller
Folsom, CA.



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Jeff Sankus
 

Hi John
To confuse you even more, the Unadilla Valley Railway could fit your needs. They ran ran an array of small steam engines throughout the years ending up running one 70 ton G.E. unit until their demise in 1960. Freight was very mixed. Lots of milk, coal, tanks for oil and fuel, logs and lumber, they even carried 50' double door auto cars delivering to a Dodge dealership. The U.V. for the most part, served the agricultural industry in up state New York. The U.V. interchanged with the NYO&W at the South end until 1955 ( O&W died) and the DL&W to the North.
Here is link to peruse if you are interested. http://www.unadillavalleyrailway.org/
Contact me off list if you would like to know more. I am presently modeling a portion of this line in S scale but, modeling the U.V. in HO would be fairly easy.

Jeff Sankus

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "John Miller" <amwing1588@...> wrote:

Hi all,

I don't know if this is the correct venue to ask this, but I will anyway. I need help in discovering a short line RR set in the early to mid 1930's (depression era). I would like to be able to research it through visits, photo's and books and then build a layout and fill it with the correct types of rolling stock appropriate for that time period.
The short line I'm interested in modeling would have had it's own road name (or even one of a major line)along with it's own rolling stock, but would also move a lot of interchange cars along it's line and might include rolling stock...from milk cars, log cars, covered hoppers to 50' auto boxes and Oh ya...lots of small to medium steamers. I've been modeling the larger mainline roads for years, but just find myself yearning for something special. There are so many of these branch lines/short lines across the country, and that being said, I'd like to hear from you all, which ones you like and why. At this point, I don't have a geographical preference, so let the suggestions fly.

Thanks to all in advance.

John Miller
Folsom, CA.


Kenneth Montero
 

Athearn has announced for January 2014 delivery its RS-3 in Interstate (pre-Southern Ry. takeover) paint scheme.

Ken Montero

----- Original Message -----
From: asychis@aol.com
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, August 6, 2013 8:22:11 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Looking for a Short Line






If you like coal roads, give a look to the Interstate Railroad, lots of
great books that almost detail the road tie by tie, and someone (Atlas?) is
coming out with an RS3 in Interstate colors. They also bought used steam
locomotives that could be modified. Interchanges with the Southern, L&N and
Clinchfield.

Jerry Michels

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Craig Zeni
 

On Aug 6, 2013, at 6:31 AM, STMFC@yahoogroups.com wrote:
2a. Looking for a Short Line
Posted by: "John Miller" amwing1588@sbcglobal.net amwing1588@sbcglobal.net
Date: Mon Aug 5, 2013 6:59 pm ((PDT))

Hi all,

I don't know if this is the correct venue to ask this, but I will anyway. I need help in discovering a short line RR set in the early to mid 1930's (depression era). I would like to be able to research it through visits, photo's and books and then build a layout and fill it with the correct types of rolling stock appropriate for that time period.
The short line I'm interested in modeling would have had it's own road name (or even one of a major line)along with it's own rolling stock, but would also move a lot of interchange cars along it's line and might include rolling stock...from milk cars, log cars, covered hoppers to 50' auto boxes and Oh ya...lots of small to medium steamers. I've been modeling the larger mainline roads for years, but just find myself yearning for something special. There are so many of these branch lines/short lines across the country, and that being said, I'd like to hear from you all, which ones you like and why. At this point, I don't have a geographical preference, so let the suggestions fly.
New York, Ontario & Western. Lots of small to medium steam engines (biggest was a class of 4-8-2s built with the NYC L2s) but mostly consolidations, camel backs (double cabs in O&W parlance), ten wheelers with many available in brass over the years. If you dieselize it's bog easy with FTs, F3s, NWs and 44 tonners. Bridge traffic, coal traffic, milk traffic, an active historical society too. I fascinating, charming road full of personality and operationally interesting.

Craig Zeni
Cary NC


Matt's Gmail <matthgmk28@...>
 

John

Ma and Pa in Maryland and Pennsylvania. St Johnsbury and Lake Champlain in Vermont. Get a copy of Mixed Train Daily lots of good ideas. Even take a look at smaller class 1's. Rutland, north end of the New York Ontario and Western.

H "Matt" Mathews
Freeland Md


Matt's Gmail <matthgmk28@...>
 

John

I was looking for a book to include on my last post. However take a look at the Cement region in Pennsylvania.
Lehigh and New England was the first company with covered hoppers

Matt